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The muses gardin for delights or fifth booke of ayers, 1610
by Robert Jones
(Dedicated to Lady Mary (Sidney) Wroth (1587?-1651?))
Part 6? - Ayres XIV. to XXI?.
Go back to 'The Fifth Booke, Part 1 - Airs I to ?III'
Go back to 'The Fifth Booke, Part 2 - ?IV?. to VI?'
Go back to ' The Fifth Booke, Part 3 - Airs ?VII?. to VIII?. '
Go back to ' The Fifth Booke, Part 4 - Airs ?IX?. to X?. '
Go back to ' The Fifth Booke, Part 5 - Airs ?XI?. to XIII?. '


Under Construction.
This is an unfinished page that I hope to edit sometime in the future.



XIV. THERE WAS A WILY LAD

- 1 -
1. There was a wyly ladde, met with a bonny lasse,
2. Much pretie sport they had, but I wot not what it was,
3. Hee woed her for a kisse, she plainely said him no,
4. I pray quoth he, nay nay quoth shee,
5. I pray you let me goe.

- 2 -
6. Full many louely tearms did passe in merrie glee,
7. He col'd her in his armes, and daunc't her on his knee,
8. And faine he would haue paide such debts as he did owe,
9. I pray quoth he, nay nay quoth shee,
10. I pray you let me goe.

- 3 -
11. Sweete be you not so nice to gratifie a friend,
12. If kissing be a vice, my sute is at an end,
13. Noe noe it is the rule, to learne a man to woe,
14. I pray quoth he, nay nay quoth shee,
15. I pray you let me goe.

- 4 -
16. For Cupid hath an eye, to play a louers part,
17. And swift his arrowes flie to leauell at the heart,
18. Thy beautie was my bane, that brought me to his bowe,
19. I pray quoth he, nay nay quoth shee,
20. I pray you let me goe.

- 5 -
21. Good Sir alas you feede, your fancie with conceit,
22. Sweete sweet how should we speede, if louers could not speake.
23. I speake but what I wish, the spirit wils me so,
24. I pray quoth he, nay nay quoth shee,
25. I pray you let me goe.

- 6 -
26. With that shee swore an Oath, and loth she was to breake it,
27. And so to please them both, he gaue and shee did take it,
28. There was no labour lost, true amitie to show,
29. Adew quoth he, nay, stay quoth shee,
30. Let's kisse before you goe.

Source ; A site created by Harald Lillmeyer. Mr. Lillmeyer typed the text from a facsimile on the 1610 booke and preserved the original spelling.
This site can be found at; http://kulturserver-bayern.de/home/harald-lillmeyer/Texte/Downloads/Downloads.html

XIV. There was a wily lad - Notes, Recordings and Comments

Recordings of this song are on;
- A Gardin For Delights - English Lutesongs From the Renaissance -
Ian Partridge (tenor) and Konrad Ragossnig (lute)
- see picture below. The Ayre on track No.3 on the CD. Also on this record is 'XVII. Love is a bable' from the 2nd book of Robert Jones.
1996 - Bayer Records 100 130.

Notes from Edmond Fellowes 'English Madrigal Verse';
"7 col'd] embraced."
Notes from Edward Doughtie's 'Lyrics From Elizabethan Airs , 1596-1622' Cambridge, Mass. Harvard University Press, 1970;
"25 you feede, your fancie. The punctuation here is metrical."

XIV. There was a wily lad - Publishing History

1927-31 - Elizabethan and Jacobean English ayres, . Vo1. I-VI. Trans. and edited from the original edition by Peter Warlock and Philip Wilson. London: OUP, 1927-31.

1956 - An Elizabethan song book: lute songs madrigals and rounds. Music ed. by Noah Greenberg; text ed. by W. H. Auden and Chester Kallman. New York: Doubleday, 1956.

A site called "Heigh! Nonny Nonny! Welcome to British Song!" at: http://www.public.asu.edu/~icwwh/#SEC4 - lists the two above books and gives this information;

Tempo - Fast/ Key - G / time signature 4 / 4 / Author of text - Anonymous / for Tenor / G3 - G4 Piano Oxford / English Ayres II Pg. 18 of collection. Also in Doubleday Anchor / Elizabethan Song Book.



XV. MY FATHER FAIN WOULD HAVE ME TAKE

1
My father faine would haue mee take
A man that hath a beard,
My mother shee cries out alacke,
And makes mee much afraide,
For sooth I am not olde enough, Nowe surely this is good ???
Faith let my mother marrie mee,
Or let some young man burie mee.

2
For I haue liu'd these fourteene yeeres,
My mother knowes it well,
What neede shee then to cast such feares,
Can any body tell ?
As though young women doe not know,
That custome will not let them wo,
I would bee glad if I might chuse,
But I were madde if I refuse.

3
My mother bids me goe to Schoole,
And learne to doe some good,
T'were well if shee would let the foole,
Come home and sucke a dugge,
As if my father knew not yet,
That maidens are for yong men fit,
Giue me my mind and let me wed,
Or you shall quickly find me dead.

4
How soone my mother hath forgot,
That euer shee was yong,
And how that shee denyed not,
But sung another song,
I must not speake what I doe thinke,
When I am drie I may not drinke,
Though her desire be now growen old,
She must haue fier when shee is cold.

5
You see the mother loues the sonne,
The father loues the maide,
What would shee haue me be a Nun ?
I will not be delaide,
I will not liue thus idle still,
My mother shall not haue her will,
My father speaketh like a man,
I will be married doe what shee can.

Source ; A site created by Harald Lillmeyer. Mr. Lillmeyer typed the text from a facsimile on the 1610 booke and preserved the original spelling.
This site can be found at; http://kulturserver-bayern.de/home/harald-lillmeyer/Texte/Downloads/Downloads.html

XV. My father fain would have me take - Notes, Recordings and Comments


XV. My father fain would have me take - Publishing History

????1927-31 - Elizabethan and Jacobean English ayres, . Vo1. I-VI. Trans. and edited from the original edition by Peter Warlock and Philip Wilson. London: OUP, 1927-31.

A site called "Heigh! Nonny Nonny! Welcome to British Song!" at: http://www.public.asu.edu/~icwwh/#SEC4 - lists the above book? and gives this information;

Tempo - Fast - G - 6 / 4 Author of text - Anonymous / for Soprano / D4 - G5 Piano Oxford / English Ayres II Pg. 20 of collection. 00:35. Humorous.
Also in Stainer / English Lute Songs 2 ( ed. Pilkington ).
--------------------------------------------------------








XVI. MY LOVE HATH HER TRUE LOVE BETRAYED

1
My loue hath her true loue betraide,
Why tis a fault that is to common,
Yet shall it not be euer saide,
My faith depended on a woman,
If shee did to prooue vntrue,
I shall doe worse to change for new.

› › › › 2
Shee hath some vertues followe them,
Take not example by her lightnesse,
Be not amongst the vulgar men,
Though shee be clouded, keepe thy brightnesse :
Perhaps her selfe in time may prooue,
What tis to wrong a constant loue.

3
The many vowes giuen by my faire,
Were none of hers : the wind did owe them,
Then weare they breath. now are they ayre.
Whence first they came, there she bestowes them.
Then maruell not thou women alter,
When all things turne to their first matter.

Source ; A site created by Harald Lillmeyer. Mr. Lillmeyer typed the text from a facsimile on the 1610 booke and preserved the original spelling.
This site can be found at; http://kulturserver-bayern.de/home/harald-lillmeyer/Texte/Downloads/Downloads.html

XVI. My love hath her true love betrayed - Notes, Recordings and Comments


XVI. My love hath her true love betrayed - Publishing History

A site called "Heigh! Nonny Nonny! Welcome to British Song!" at: http://www.public.asu.edu/~icwwh/#SEC4 - gives this information;

My Love Hath Her True Love Betrayed. Why, Četis a fault that is too common ( [Fifth Booke 1610 #16]) Allegretto - G - 4 / 4 Anonymous Tenor or baritone / G3 - F4 Piano Stainer / English Lute Songs 2 ( ed. Pilkington ) ? Pg. 66 of collection.



XVII. ALL MY SENSE THY SWEETNESS GAINED

1
All my sense thy sweetnesse gained
Thy faire hayre my heart enchained.
My poore reason thy wordes mooued,
So that thee like heauen I loued.
Fa, la, la,
Dan, dan, dan,
While to my minde the outside stood,
For messenger of inward good.

2
Now thy sweetnesse sowre is deemed,
Thy hayre not worth a hayre esteemed,
While to my minde the outside stood,
Finding that, but words they proou'd,
Fa, la, la,
Dan, dan, dan,
For no faire Signe can credit winne,
If that the substance faile within.

3
No more in thy sweetnesse glorie,
For thy knitting hayre be sorie,
Vse thy words but to bewaile thee,
That no more thy beames auaile thee,
Fa, la, la,
Dan, dan, dan,
Lay not thy colours more to viewe,
Without the Picture be found true.

4
Woe to me, alas shee weepeth,
Foole in me, what folly creepeth,
Was I to blasphemie enraged,
Where my soule I haue engaged,
Fa, la, la,
Dan, dan, dan,
And wretched I must yeeld to this,
The fault I blame her chastnesse is.

5
Sweetnesse sweetly pardon folly,
Tye my hayre your captiue solly,
Words O words of heauenly knowledge,
Know my words their faults acknowledge,
Fa, la, la,
Dan, dan, dan,
And all my life I will confesse,
The lesse I loue, I liue the lesse.

words by: Sir Philip Sidney

Source ; A site created by Harald Lillmeyer. Mr. Lillmeyer typed the text from a facsimile on the 1610 booke and preserved the original spelling.
This site can be found at; http://kulturserver-bayern.de/home/harald-lillmeyer/Texte/Downloads/Downloads.html

XVII. All my sense thy sweetness gained - Notes, Recordings and Comments

words by: Sir Philip Sidney



XVIII. TO THEE, DEAF ASP

1
To the deafe Aspe with dying voice,
Sadly I sing this heauie charme,
That if thy heart doe ere reioyce,
And set at nought my grieuous harme,
This verse writ with a dead mans arme,
May haunt thy senselesse eyes and eares,
Turne ioyes to cares and hopes to feares.

2
By the Creators pietie,
By her that brought thee to this light,
By thy deare Nurses loue to thee,
By Loue it selfe, Heauens, Day and Night,
By all that can thy sense delight,
When I am cold, and wrapt in Lead,
Remember of thy seruant dead.

3
So shall my shadow thee attend,
Like calmest breath of Westerne wind,
If not : with grones it shall ascend,
Like Rauen, Owle, Beare, or hellish feind,
Ratling the chaines which doe it bind,
And where thou art by silent night,
It shall thy guiltie soule affright.

4
Yet Sea-men tost with stormie wind,
Voide of all hope, resolu'd to die,
From powerfull heauens oft mercie find,
And so may I find grace with thee,
No, no, thou canst not pitie me,
Aspes cannot heare, nor liue can I,
Thou hearest not, vnheard I die.

Source ; A site created by Harald Lillmeyer. Mr. Lillmeyer typed the text from a facsimile on the 1610 booke and preserved the original spelling.
This site can be found at; http://kulturserver-bayern.de/home/harald-lillmeyer/Texte/Downloads/Downloads.html

XVIII. To thee, deaf asp - Notes, Recordings and Comments




XIX. BEHOLD HER LOCKS

1
Behold her lockes like wyers of beaten Gold
Her eyes like stars that twinkle in the skie,
Her heauenly face, not fram'd of earthly mold,
Her voice that sounds the heauens melody,
The miracles of time, the worldes storie,
Fortunes Queene, Loues treasure, Natures glorie.

2
No flattering hopes shee likes, blind Fortunes baite,
Nor shadowes of delight, fond fancies glasse,
Nor charmes that doe inchant, false Arts deceipt,
Nor fading ioyes, which time makes swiftly passe,
But chast desires, which beateth all these downe,
A Goddesse looke is worth a Monarches Crowne.

Source ; A site created by Harald Lillmeyer. Mr. Lillmeyer typed the text from a facsimile on the 1610 booke and preserved the original spelling.
This site can be found at; http://kulturserver-bayern.de/home/harald-lillmeyer/Texte/Downloads/Downloads.html

XIX. Behold Her locks - Notes, Recordings and Comments

I don't know of any recording of this song but there is a midi file available from Mr. Harald Lillmeyer's site. - P. T. C

Notes from Edward Doughtie's 'Lyrics From Elizabethan Airs , 1596-1622 ';




XX. ALTHOUGH THE WINGS OF MY DESIRES

1
Although the wings of my desires bee clipte,
And my Loue thoughtes, from mounting lowlye bounded,
Though flie suspect my ioyes with frost hath nipt,
So as my hopes with feares are still surrounded,
Yet will I liue to loue, although through loue I die,
And Cumbers still do grow, and comforts from mee flie,
No iealous thoughts shall force mee to retyre,
But I will hope to enioye my hearts desire.

2
Which likes to Loue, and yet the same conceale,
Remembrance chiefly working my relieuing,
Though times of ioye be short, yet will I steale
Such times, to keepe my heart from further grieuing,
Force may remooue my lookes, but not expell my ioy,
Though Cupids shaft giue curelesse wounds, tis no annoy,
Whilest life endures, Ile loue though seeme to shunne
That port of rest, from whence my comforts come.

Source ; A site created by Harald Lillmeyer. Mr. Lillmeyer typed the text from a facsimile on the 1610 booke and preserved the original spelling.
This site can be found at; http://kulturserver-bayern.de/home/harald-lillmeyer/Texte/Downloads/Downloads.html

XX. Although the wings of my desires - Notes, Recordings and Comments

I don't know of any recording of this song but there is a midi file available from Mr. Harald Lillmeyer's site. - P. T. C

Notes from Edward Doughtie's 'Lyrics From Elizabethan Airs , 1596-1622 ';




XXI. MIGHT I REDEEM MINE ERRORS

1
Might I redeeme myne errours with mine eyes
And shed but for each seuerall sinne a teare,
The summe to such a great account should rise,
That I should neuer make mine Audit cleare,
The totall is too bigge to paye the score,
I am so rich in sinne, in teares so poore.

2
O wretched wealth that doth procure such want,
Vnhappy soule to bee so rich in sin,
The store whereof doth make all graces scant,
And stops thy teares, ere they doe scarce begin,
What once a famous Poet sung before,
I finde too true my plenty makes me poore.

3
O might I prooue in this a prodigall,
And bate my meanes by less'ning of my stocke,
I should in grace grow great, in sinnes but small,
If I could euery day from forth the shocke
But pull one eare, O ten-times happy want,
When teares increase and sinnes doe grow more scant.

4
O that my God with such sweete strokes would strike,
And by his grace so bank-rout mine estate,
That growing poore in sinne I Lazar like,
Might dayly beg for mercy at his gate,
And craue (though not admittance to his feast)
Some crums of grace to feede my soule at least.

Source ; A site created by Harald Lillmeyer. Mr. Lillmeyer typed the text from a facsimile on the 1610 booke and preserved the original spelling.
This site can be found at; http://kulturserver-bayern.de/home/harald-lillmeyer/Texte/Downloads/Downloads.html

XXI. Might I redeem mine errors - Notes, Recordings and Comments

A recording of this song is on the CD 'The Muses Gardin: Lute Songs by Robert Jones' by Emma Kirkbe and Anthony Rooley (1991), on Virgin Classics. This is the only song that they did from this fifth book. They did four songs from Jones' four other Air books.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ---------------


Written & compiled by Patrick T. Connolly, ©
This page was revised, written & compiled on November 23 and 24, 2003.
Updated August 9, 2005.





The muses gardin for delights or fifth booke of ayers, 1610 onely for the lute, bas-vyoll, and the voyce ... printed by the assignes of William Barley.
by Robert Jones
(Dedicated to Lady Mary (Sidney) Wroth (1587?-1651?))

Publishing History

1610. The original book was first published in 1610. RISM A/I/4 J647.

1927. Transcribed, Scored and Edited by Edmund H. Fellowes.
The English School of Lutenist Song-Writers Series 2, volume 15. The muses gardin for delights: or fifth booke of ayers, 1610.
Original accompaniment transcribed from the tablature into modern notation for piano.
London: Stainer & Bell, 53 pages.

1970. Facsimile edition : Facsimile of the copy in the Huntington Library.
English lute songs, series Volume 30. The first booke of songes a ayres, 1600. Edited by David Greer. Menston. Eng.: Scolar press, 35 pages

The complete texts and accurate midi files of this the fifth bookecan be found on a site created by Harald Lillmeyer at; http://kulturserver-bayern.de/home/harald-lillmeyer/Texte/Downloads/Downloads.html






Written & compiled by Patrick T. Connolly, ©
This page was revised, written & compiled on November 23 and 24, 2003.
Updated August 9, 2005. Last update August 4, 2010.
Go back to 'The Fifth Booke, Part 1 - Airs I to ?III'
Go back to 'The Fifth Booke, Part 2 - ?IV?. to VI?'
Go back to ' The Fifth Booke, Part 3 - Airs ?VII?. to VIII?. '
Go back to ' The Fifth Booke, Part 4 - Airs ?IX?. to X?. '
Go back to ' The Fifth Booke, Part 5 - Airs ?XI?. to XIII?. '

Return to ' The First Booke 1600, Part 1 - Airs I to III'.
Return to 'The Third Booke 1605, Part 1 - Airs I to IV'.

Get into 'The life of Robert Jones'
Find the Life of Philip Rosseter
Go back to ' The Phreap Site '.




I. Love is a pretty frenzy

II. Soft, Cupid, soft
I may soon post an mp3 recording of this song on my SoundClick site;
http://www.soundclick.com/bands/7/tricktolly.htm
III. As I the seely fish deceive
IV. The fountains Smoke
VI. Walking by the river side
VII. I cannot choose but give a smile
VIII. Joy in thy hope
XVIII. How many new years have grow'n old
XIX. There is a shepherd that did live
X. The sea hath many thousand sands
XI. Once did my thoughts both ebb and flow
XII. I am so far from pitying thee
XIII. As I lay lately in a dream