back to 'The Complete Works Of Philip Rosseter - Part 1
- William Barley's 1596 book 'A new Booke of Tabliture for the Orpharion' and Philip Rosseter A Book of Ayres (1601)'

Go back to The Complete Works Of Philip Rosseter Part 2
- Philip Rosseter's Lessons for Consort 1609

back to ' The Philip Rosseter and Robert Jones Web Site '.
back to ' The Phreap Site '.

Go to ' The Complete Works Of Robert Jones '.
Go to The Life of Robert Jones.



The Complete Works Of Philip Rosseter
Part 3a. - Works of Philip Rosseter found in Manuscripts
Part 3b. - Philip Rosseter; the Arranger of Thomas Campion's Songs


Under Construction.
This is an unfinished page that I hope to edit sometime in the future.


[This was to be just the short list of the life works of composer Philip Rosseter. We have only about 34 short pieces by this minor composer and fine lutenist who's times and friends were of major influence.]

- The 3 Better Known Pieces from Manuscripts -

On page 56 of The Life and Works of Philip Rosseter by John Jeffreys writes (in his chapter (b) Instrumental Pieces);
"Apart from the twenty-one songs in his Book of Ayres the only other work by Philip Rosseter are 'The Lessons for Consort', and a pavan and galliard preserved in Jane Pickeringe's Lute Book, ... now in the possession of the British Museum. ..."

- see the list below for more on these pieces.

However Dr. Craig-McFeely has shown there is a handful of other instrumental Pieces composed by Rosseter. Jeffreys also missed William Barley's 1596 book 'A new Booke of Tabliture for the Orpharion' that has 3 very early pieces by Rosseter.

Maybe one of the earliest pieces of Rosseter is, the widely copied (in his time), 'The Prince of Portugal's Galliard / La Bergera Galliard'.

La Bergera is close to, in French, 'the shepherdess' but I am not sure if it is the same in Portuguese or Spanish.
From a translation site; http://babelfish.altavista.com/babelfish/tr
Fr. - la bergere - to Eng. - the shepherdess
Fr. - Quant la bergere - to Eng. - As the shepherdess

- see the list below for more on this piece;



--- Most of he following information comes from JULIA CRAIG-McFEELY 1994 -- her site ENGLISH LUTE MANUSCRIPTS AND SCRIBES 1530-1630

I will try to follow some of her abbreviations and link to her pages.

Rosseter, Philip [1567/8-1623] (see above) Barley 1596 (Orph.) 55-56, (Orph.) 57-58, (Orph.) 59


A list of pieces by Rosseter found in Manuscripts (8 Pieces in blue)
From 'Jane Pickeringe¼s Lute Book';

a *25th? piece. - original ascription 'A Pavin by Rossetters' in 'Jane Pickeringe¼s Lute Book' on folio 25v- 26/1.
No cons. or cogs.

a *26th? piece. - original ascription 'A galyerd by Rossesters' Pickeringe on folio 26/2, also in Dowland.9.33, on folio 47v-48.

Jeffreys writes several pages on these two piece;
"The pavan and galliard of Rosseter which appear in Jane Pickeringe¼s Lute Book are beautifully written out but they do contain some obvious errors, especially in the pavan." [page 58 & 59.]

In some published song books like The Renaissance Guitar by Frederick Noad you get a title that simply says "Galliard (Philip Rosseter)" I would assume it is this Galliard from Jane Pickeringe¼s Lute Book however I have yet to see or hear this music..

Also in Noad's book is;
Mrs. Anne Harecourt's Galliard (Francis Pilkington)
Mrs. Taylor's Galliard (Philip Rosseter)
Rest Sweet Nymphs Francis Pilkington
http://www.sheetmusicplus.com/a/item.html?id=83645&item=3798918


a *27th? piece. - original ascriptions 'La Bergera Galliard. [index:] La bergera Galliarde'. Modern title 'Prince of Portugal's Galliard/La Bergera Galliard, first part of dt orconsort pt)
In Dowland.3.18 on folio 41/2. [GB-Cambridge University Library, Ms.Dd.3.18 ] Dated: c1585-1600. "part of Holmes's set of consort books"
also in Board 23/1 and Valerius 1626 86.
From Margaret Board Lute Book

a *28? piece. - original ascription 'An Almayne Philip Rosseter'. Modern title 'Almain'. From Margaret Board Lute Book Dated: c1620 and 1635 Board - On folio 28v/1;
http://www.cs.dartmouth.edu/~wbc/julia/ap1/Board.htm [23/1,]


From Dowland.9.33.

*29th? piece. - On folio 46/2-46v. - original ascription 'Rosseter'. Modern title 'Galliard Philip Rosseter'. - Dowland.9.33 46/2-46v, ...
No cons. or cogs.


From 'The Lutebooke of Edward Lord Herbert';

Herbert - On folios 10/2, 21-21v/1. The Lutebooke of Edward Lord Herbert, of Cherbury and Castle Island GB-Cambridge, Fitzwilliam Museum, Ms.Mus.689. Dated: c1630 and 1640;
http://www.cs.dartmouth.edu/~wbc/julia/ap1/Herbert.htm

*30th? piece. - On folio 10/2. - original ascription 'Prelude'. P: Rosseter. Modern title 'Prelude Philip Rosseter'.

*31st? piece. - On folio 21. - original ascription 'Pauana'. Ph: Rosseter. Modern title 'Countess of Sussex's Pavan' Philip Rosseter.

*3? piece. - On folio 21v/1. - original ascription 'Gagliarda della Pauana'. Countess of Sussex's Galliard (see above)
*3 (3) Philip Rosseter cf: Barley 1596 59 (orph.)


*32? piece. From Montbuysson [non English] D-KlMs.4deg..Mus.108.1 Victor de Montbuysson 1611
- On folio 99/2. - original ascription 'galliard P R'. Modern title 'Galliard Philip Rosseter'.

in Philip Rosseter's Lessons for Consort 1609 Now is the Moneth of May, Thomas Morley
*-? Vilnius 8/2 / L-VsMs.285-MF-LXXIX Stobaeus of Kñnigsberg c1600-20
8/2İ FeinesLieb du wirst nachkommenİ Now is the Month of Mayingİ Philip Rosseter İRosseter 1609 no.5


Go back to The Complete Works Of Philip Rosseter
Part 2 - Philip Rosseter's Lessons for Consort 1609


Complied or written by Patrick Thomas Connolly on March 16, 19, & 31, 2001, March 21, 2002, December 14, 2003 and April 20, 22 & 30, 2007, and March 6, 2009.
All materials are copyright, 2007, by Patrick Thomas Connolly
This page was first posted April 22, 2007. Edited some and updated March 6, 2009.
Page Bibliography
%'The Lute Society' makes available "The Lute Music of Philip Rosseter" edited by Robert Spencer and the following is the information they advertise about it;

The Lute Music of Philip Rosseter edited by Robert Spencer and revised by John H. Robinson and Stewart McCoy. 10 pieces of which 4 are in multiple versions. Includes an introduction, table of concordances, editorial notes, and 21 pages of music, ISBN 0 905 655 13 3
The URL is [no longer valid?];
http://dialspace.dial.pipex.com/town/square/fl98/lute/index.htm


The Life and Works of Philip Rosseter by John Jeffreys
Roberton Publication, 1990, The Windmill, Wendover, Aylesbury, HP22 6JJ.
Printed in Great Britain by Lavenham Press Ltd.
UUU# Sussex - .
Herbert. GB-Cambridge, Fitzwilliam Museum, Ms.Mus.689. tldot DATE: c1630 and 1640. Page measurements: 331 x 218 mm. Household or personal anthology in...
URL: www.cs.dartmouth.edu/~wbc/julia/ap1/Herbert.htm


back to ' The Philip Rosseter and Robert Jones Web Site '.
back to ' The Phreap Site '.

Edmund H. Fellowes' l922 preface;
"Rosseter was survived by his widow and two sons, Philip and Dudley, his brother Hugh also survived him. His nuncupative will was proved on May 2I.

March 16, 19 & 31, 2001 Patrick Thomas Connolly


%'The Lute Society' makes available "The Lute Music of Philip Rosseter" edited by Robert Spencer and the following is the information they advertise about it;

The Lute Music of Philip Rosseter edited by Robert Spencer and revised by John H. Robinson and Stewart McCoy. 10 pieces of which 4 are in multiple versions. Includes an introduction, table of concordances, editorial notes, and 21 pages of music, ISBN 0 905 655 13 3
The URL is;
http://dialspace.dial.pipex.com/town/square/fl98/lute/index.htm


%% ENCYCLOPEDIA BRITANNICA site URL is;
http://www.britannica.com/seo/t/thomas-campion/



The Complete Works Of Philip Rosseter
Part 3b. (Old Part 4) - Philip Rosseter the Arranger of Thomas Campion's Songs

There are a few pieces printed by Thomas Campion in his Mask descriptions. One of these pieces is "Move Now With Measured Sound". It is from Lord Hayes Wedding Jan. 5, 1607 and is the same music as "The Peaceful western wind" of Thomas Campion's "The Second Book of Ayres (c.1613)" [I am seeing CD it says "- - - " but as I remember from the last time I saw the faximally about 15 years ago the song was credited to Rosseter]
This brings to mind the question how much of the music of Campion was actually by Philip Rosseter.
I bought a wonderful CD (the first that I have ever seen) that is compleatly dedicated to Thomas Campion. It is by Michael Chance and Nigel North and is titled "English Ayres by Thomas Campion."

Nigel North states in his liner notes;

"Campion was probably not a lute player and I know of no reference to his playing. The style of his accompaniments varies somewhat and this leads me to suspect that various lutenists wrote them for him. Campion must have composed his ayres by first writing the vrocal line and bass part and later having a lutenist write out a fill accompaniment in tablature. In the Booke of Ayres (1601), the lute parts are typically contrapuntal for the period, but are aimed at the amateur player; these were probably written by Rosseter. Indeed, concerning the accompaniments, Rosseter and Campion write: (if they satisfie the most, we have our desire; let expert masters please themselves with better'. They are clearly saying that you can invent your own accompaniments if you wish. ...
After the Booke of Ayres (1601), the lute style changes to a more harmonic, quasi-continuo style. Books 1 & 2 are very simple and are not the work, I think, of Rosseter., Books 3 & 4, still in a continuo style, come alive again and these may Well have been Rosseter's work."


The liner notes of another CD; Nigel North's 'English Ayres by Thomas Campion' he give his thoughts on Rosseter and Campion;

"... patron Sir Thomas Monson (1564-1641) was implicated in the case and unjustly imprisoned from 1615-1617. He survived and was released, although never truly recovered. Unfortunately, Campion had visited him at the tower in his role as Doctor of Phisicke and was also suspected and, while not imprisoned, suffered court examination. When both Campion and Monson were cleared and liberated, Campion celebrated by the publication of his Third and Fourth Bookes of Ayres, dedicated to Monson and his son. By this time Campion was clearly ruined at court and never regained royal favour. He was unmarried without family and when he died three years later Campion left the little that he had (twenty-two pounds) to his dear friend Philip Rosseter, saying with his last breath that he "wished that his estate had been far more".

Campion was probably not a lute player and I know of no reference to his playing. [I have however found a reference; Playing the lute is referred to by Campion in his "Elegy XVII. TO HIS FRIENDS, DURING AN ILLNESS "I was indisposed, ... My mind was dulled by sickness of spirit. The lute dropped from my hands, nor could my wind come in nimble breaths to sustain the notes of its song." - ? Sutton¼s translation from Latin? - P. T. C.] The style of his accompaniments varies somewhat and this leads me to suspect that various lutenists wrote them for him. Campion must have composed his ayres by first writing the vocal line and bass part and later having a lutenist write out a fill accompaniment in tablature. In the Booke of Ayres (1601), the lute parts are typically contrapuntal for the period, but are aimed at the amateur player; these were probably written by Rosseter. Indeed, concerning the accompaniments, Rosseter and Campion write: (if they satisfie the most, we have our desire; let expert masters please themselves with better'. They are clearly saying that you can invent your own accompaniments if you wish. I have not exactly done that, but in declamatory songs such as All looks be pale I felt free to do my own thing, as a continuo player may. In other, lighter ayres, I responded with ornamentation.

After the Booke of Ayres (1601), the lute style changes to a more harmonic, quasi-continuo style. Books 1 & 2 are very simple and are not the work, I think, of Rosseter., Books 3 & 4, still in a continuo style, come alive again and these may Well have been Rosseter's work.

Campion writes very clearly in his introduction to the First Booke of Ayres (c.1613) that (These Ayres were for the most part framed at first for one voyce ..."



Page Bibliography
The Life and Works of Philip Rosseter by John Jeffreys
Roberton Publication, 1990, The Windmill, Wendover, Aylesbury, HP22 6JJ.
Printed in Great Britain by Lavenham Press Ltd.
Michael Chance and Nigel North's CD 'English Ayres by Thomas Campion'

Edmund H. Fellowes' l922

Complied or written by Patrick Thomas Connolly on November 3 & 12, 2003 and April 20 & 22, 2007.
All materials are copyright, 2007, by Patrick Thomas Connolly
First posted April 22, 2007.
back to 'The Complete Works Of Philip Rosseter - Part 1 - William Barley's 1596 book 'A new Booke of Tabliture for the Orpharion' and Philip Rosseter A Book of Ayres (1601)'
Go ahead to The Complete Works Of Philip Rosseter
Part 2 - Philip Rosseter's Lessons for Consort 1609

back to ' The Philip Rosseter and Robert Jones Web Site '.
back to ' The Phreap Site '.




- - - - - Old stuff - - - - - - ["The Lute Music" is not available to me - thus this piece is only a rough draft. I welcome any suggestions and corrections]
The Lute Music of Philip Rosseter Edmund H. Fellowes' l922 preface;
"He held 'office as one of the royal lutenists in the Court of James I., with an annual stipend of [pounds] 20 and an allowance of [pounds] 162s.6d. for livery. In 1609 he published a set of '' Lessons for the Consort: made by sundry excellent Authors, and set to sixe seuerall instrument." No other compositions of his were printed."

Edmund H. Fellowes' l922 preface;
"Rosseter lost his friend Campian on March 1st, 1619-20, when the latter bequeathed him all his property, amounting in value to about [pounds] 20, expressing a wish" that it had bin farr more." Rosseter did not long survive his friend; he died in Fetter Lane on May 5th, 1623. and was buried two, days later at St. Dunsta's in the West, where Campian also was buried."