Thomas Campion - encyclopedia article from Britannica.com http://www.britannica.com/seo/t/thomas-campion/

Campion's lyric poetry and songs for lute accompaniment are undoubtedly his works of most lasting interest. His music (always for "ayres," not madrigals) is delicate, singable, and expressive. ...
The Cambridge History of English and American Literature: An Encyclopedia in Eighteen Volumes. 1907 –21


... from part II of A Booke of Ayres.
"When Laura smiles, her sight revives both night and day" the first line of no. IX, is itself slightly peculiar in its freedom from any marked caesura, a feature reproduced in the first lines of stanzas 3 and 4. But hardly any two corresponding lines in the rest of the poem are metrically similar. No. XV, again, contains some curious rhythms: "If I hope, I pine; if I feare, I faint and die"
No. XII, Shall I come, if I swim? wide are the waves, you see" exhibits a lack of uniformity similar to that of no. IX. In this piece, too, we become aware of a feature which will frequently assert itself, a certain ambiguity as to the correct prosodic rendering. The two lines Shall I come, if I flie, my deare love, to thee?" and "She a priest, yet th heate of lovve truly felt" correspond in their respective stanzas. But to get actual metrical correspondence, it would be necessary to read "my deare love" whereas the accent falls more naturally on "my." Which rhythm expresses the poet's intention? To this and similar queries there is no authoritative reply, "my." Which ...