Go to 'The Complete Works Of Philip Rosseter - Part 1
- William Barley's 1596 book 'A new Booke of Tabliture for the Orpharion' and Philip Rosseter A Book of Ayres (1601)'

Go to The Complete Works Of Philip Rosseter Part 2
- Philip Rosseter's Lessons for Consort 1609

Go to 'The Complete Works Of Philip Rosseter - Part 3a. - Works of Philip Rosseter found only in Manuscripts' &
Part 3b. - Philip Rosseter; The Arranger of Thomas Campion's Songs

Find the Life of Philip Rosseter
back to ' The Philip Rosseter and Robert Jones Web Site '.
New to this site, in 2012, is - A John Dowland Page
back to ' The Phreap Site '.
Philip Rosseter's A Book of Ayres
(from the Thomas Campion/Rosseter book of 1601)
- Ayres X to XVII. -

Back to 'A Book of Ayres - Ayres VI to VIII.
Back to 'Ayre IX. 'When Laura smiles'
To ''A Book of Ayres' - Ayres XVII to XIX.



Under Construction.
This is an unfinished page that I hope to edit sometime in the future.



X. LONG HAVE MINE EYES GAZED - by Philip Rosseter

Long haue mine eies gaz'd with delight,
Conueying hopes vnto my soule,
In nothing happy but in sight,
Of her that doth my sight controule,
But now mine eies must loose their light.

My obiect now must be the aire,
To write in water words of fire,
And teach sad thoughts how to despaire,
Desert must quarrell with desire,
All were appeas'd were she not faire.

For all my comfort this I proue,
That Venus on the Sea was borne,
If Seas be calme then doth she loue,
If stormes arise I am forlorne,
My doubtfull hopes like wind doe moue.

Online text copyright , Harald Lillmeyer [with kind permission] www.harald-lillmeyer.kulturserver.de

'X. Long have mine eyes gaz'd' - (And Shakespeare's 'O mistress mine') - Notes, Recordings and Comments

I am very interested in finding some connection Philip Rosseter had to William Shakespeare. After 1609 Rosseter became a theatre and acting troupe manager and so it seems likely that they would have known each other. Here we have Rosseter's lyrics to 'Long have mine eyes gazed' used to go with some music that has come to be associated with Shakespeare's 'O mistress mine'. When I first read about this I thought about building a case to show Rosseter knew Shakespeare.

If I understand this properly, this is a tune composed [or by someone unknown and a variaition ] by the great English composer William Byrd which is now widely used in modern theatre productions of Shakespeare's Twelfth Night for Feste's song 'O mistress mine' found in (Act 2, Scene 3). A version of this tune was used to add music to this Rosseter poem, 'Long have mine eyes gaz'd', in a book belonging to John Gamble (Cornettist and violinist at the English Court, 1660-1684) who would have belonged to the generation that came after Rosseter and Shakespeare. Gamble published a book of 'Ayres and Dialogues' in 1656 whereas Rosseter died on May 5, 1623. This is important because this is the earliest document we have of this [Byrd?] tune being used.

This becomes more complicated because there is another tune [or a varition of it?] that is also widely used in modern theatre productions of Shakespeare's Twelfth Night for 'O mistress mine' this tune that carries the title "O Mistress Mine" is in Morley's 'The First Book of Consort Lessons' (1599). Thomas Morley was certainly an Elizabethan, as he passed away just before the Queen, and he probably worked with Shakespeare in putting his "It was a Lover and his Lass" into "As You Like it". Thus there are two "Elizabethan" tunes widely used in modern theatre productions for Feste's song 'O mistress mine'. (It becomes even more confusing because the eighth song in Morley's only booke of ayres is titled "Mistress mine well may you fare". My page on Thomas Morley will be my "The Triumphs of Oriana" page and I may add more on Morley there.)

I am not sure how far (or whether) the modern use of the Morley tune has its roots as far back as the [Byrd?] tune. Perhaps James Walker is aware of a long tradition in the use of the [Byrd?] tune and thus uses '"The" Elizabethan tune' because the modern use of the Morley tune has only been used for, say, the last fifty years? Oh! Is it that Walker thinks of there being only one tune and Morley's tune is a varition on it. [I have always been supposing that there are two different tunes but it seems Walker and Greer think that it is the same tune - sorry this has been difficult to write - and for you to read - no doubt.].

James Walker is talking about the tune [was it] entitled 'O Mistress Mine'? from something [that Byrd did a varition on] in Byrd's catalog? when he writes;

"The Elizabethan tune which has been traditionally associated with Feste's song may not have been the one used in the original performances. An expanded version of the title found in a seventeenth-century inventory, 'O mistress mine I must' implies that it was used with a different lyric[see Gooch and Thatcher]; but new words were often fitted to popular tunes, as in the Gamble version ... In any case, this is the only contemporary tune remotely connected with the words, and its contours and rhythm are close enough to Shakespeare's ... The essential difficulty is that the tune is fashioned for a five-line stanza, whereas Shakespeare's stanzas are of six lines. [p. 223]

"The basic, shortest version of the tune ... was discovered in 1954 by Vincent Duckles in a commonplace book belonging to John Gamble (d. 1687)1, [1 'New Light on 'O Mistress Mine'', Renaissance News, 7 (1954), 98-100.] who fits to the the tune words from Philip Rosseter's A Book of Ayres (1601), where they are set to quite different music [Rosseter's music - yes?]. Gamble may have associated this tune and these words because the fifth verse [but Rosseter's poem only has 3 verses?] of this poem begins "Then mistress mine"; but while the tune fits the five-line stanza from Rosseter's book, it is one phrase too short for Shakespeare's.

Ex. 2 [James Walker adds the musical notation]
Original Key D J. Gamble's commonplace book

Long have mine eyes gazed with delight, [8]
Conveying hopes unto my soul; [8]
Happy in nothing but the sight [8]
Of her that doth eyesight control. [7]
That now mine eyes must lose their light." [8]

In his Example # 3 [p. 224] James Walker adds the musical notation to "The keyboard varitions on 'O Mistress Mine' by William Byrd (1543-1623 ) [I do not know where or when this comes from. - PTC]"

For his Example # 4 he adds the musical notation to Morley's tune; [p. 225] Walker writes; "An even longer version is found in Morley's 'The First Book of Consort Lessons' (1599) by Thomas Morley ... Again there are melodic differences and the repeat starts one line earlier, giving a total of eight phrases, two too many "

Source ; From 'The Oxford Shakespeare Twelfth Night, Or What You Will
The Oxford Shakespeare Twelfth Night, Or What You Will, The Music edited by James Walker

Another note I have on this matter is from David Greer who writes;
"The tune entitled "O Mistress Mine" in Morley's *Consort Lessons* has nothing to do with the song in *Twelfth Night* beyond the title. Apart from the difficulty of fitting the words to the tune, the same tune is found in Paris, Bibl. Nat., MS Res. 1122, with a fuller title "O mistris myne I must", indicating that it was intended for different words."

[Dr. Greer would mean that Morley's tune "has nothing to do with the song in 'Twelfth Night'" in the time of Shakespeare. In the 20 Century "O Mistress Mine" and Morley's tune (and [or] the other tune) have formed a connection that may never be broken - I have come to enjoy this combination very much.]

Dr. Greer and James Walker seem to both think there is only one tune for they must mean it is the same tune which is in the Paris library which goes, "O mistris myne I must"

It is not clear to me what the first source of this music is, whether or not it was by an anonymous writer or if it was a Byrd or Morley's tune.

James Walker concern is helping someone in doing a production of Shakespeare's Twelfth Night and not with finding the original music to Shakespeare. Both tunes [or the one with varitions] are most likely not the original music used in Shakespeare's Twelfth Night because neither of them fit the lyrics. [X(As Walker says; "The essential difficulty is that the tune is fashioned for a five-line stanza, whereas Shakespeare's stanzas are of six lines". and Greer says it "has nothing to do with the song in *Twelfth Night* beyond the title. Apart from the difficulty of fitting the words to the tune, the same tune is found in Paris, Bibl. Nat., MS Res. 1122, with a fuller title "O mistris myne I must", indicating that it was intended for different words.")].

That Gamble used the tune shows us that the tune remained popular after Rosseter's music was likely forgotten but in this, showing it had any connection to Shakespeare's Twelfth Night it is in this case as Walker says "remotely"

If this was the original tune used in Shakespeare's Twelfth Night - it would mean practically nothing - of Rosseter having anything to do with William Shakespeare. - - but as little ..
as much to say that the tune was Shakespeare's as much as Shakespeare ..
Rosseter

Work on updated; September 4, 2011 & March 15, 29, & April 2, 12, 13, 16, 18, 19, 20 & 23, 24, 25, 26 & 27, & May 1 & 2, September 10, 2012, Patrick T. Connolly.
Last update posted on September 10, 2012.

John Jeffreys writes "The three versed 'Long have mine eyes gazed with delight' provides a good contrast to 'Laura' with its more tentative admiration of the lady subject." [* page 46]

I don't know of any recordings of 'Long have mine eyes gazed' but the words will fit to [William Bird's?] tune and Thomas Morley tune from his Consort Lessons better than they do .


The tune William Byrd did a keyboard varition on, and the tune by Thomas Morley (in his 'Consort Lessons') used for Shakespeare's "O Mistress Mine" are both preformed on some of the CDs below.

Left to right; - Shakespeare Songs, Deller Consort; - Shakespeare Songs & Consort Music (by Byrd, Morley, Wilson, Weelkes, et al), by the Deller Consort; - Shakespeare's England, by James Griffett; - Music Of Shakespeare, Alba Musica Kyo.

Alfred Deller who past away in 1979 recorded the [Byrd?] tune in about 1969 for it seems the original LP was released in 1969 and 1972. The two discs by the Deller Consort are repackages of the same LP but on 'Shakespeare Songs & Consort Music' more music has been added.
For tenor James Griffett with Brian Wright on Lute - in the notes to the CD James Murray writes "the music in this collection is the work of unknown hands. ... [and] also contemporaneous settings in existence of 'O mistress mine' (Twelfth Night) by Thomas Morley and William Byrd, ...". I think Griffett sings the [Byrd?] setting to Shakespeare's two verses and then adds Shakespeare's first verse again but using the music from Morley for this 3rd round of music. This is all on the opening track of his CD.
The Ensemble Alba Musica Kyo preform "O Mistress Mine" using the tune in Morley's 'Consort Lessons' to open their CD and then follow with an instrumental version of William Byrd's tune for track 2 on the CD. This instrumental version of William Byrd's tune is done with strings and flutes [It is clear to that Byrd did a keyboard varitions on "The tune" but it is not clear to if we know that he wrote it.].

The fact that we have two of the three CDs here starting with 'O mistress mine' must indicate that it is one of the most important songs in the catalog of Shakespeare's songs.



XI. THOUGH FAR FROM JOY - by Philip Rosseter

Though far from joy, my sorrows are as far,
And I both between,
Not too low, nor yet too high
Above my reach would I be seen,
Happy is he that so is placed,
Not to be envied, nor to be disdain'd or disgraced.

The higher trees, the more storms they endure,
Shrubs be trodden down,
But the mean, the golden mean,
Doth only all our fortunes crown,
Like to a stream that sweetly slideth,
Through the flowery banks, and still in the midst
his course guideth.

Source ; From "English lyrics with translations".
This lyric is typed on a web site headed "English lyrics with translations" I can not tell you more about it because I don't read Russian. If you want to see a Russian[?] translation of this lyric visit that site at - http://www.ark.ru:8101/lyrics/renessans.html

'XI. Though far from joy' - Notes, Recordings and Comments

John Jeffreys writes "The eleventh poem again leaves love for the introspection of 'Though far from joy' with its reference to 'the golden mean' which endangers the peace of sweet reason." [* page 47]

There is a recordings of this song by tenor James Gilchrist with Matthew Wadsworth on lute. It is on the CD called 'When Laura Smiles (Lute solos & songs from Elizabethan England): Works of Philip Rosseter' on AVIE Records.
It was recorded at St. Martin's Church, East Woodhay, Newbu -- and Released on January 1, 2006.
This may be the first CD entirely dedicated to the music of Philip Rosseter and may be the first available recording of this Ayre. Of the 21 Ayres of this booke it covers the 12 listed and linked below;
'I. Sweet, come again', and 'II. And would you see my mistress' face',
'III. No grave for woe', and 'V. What heart's content',
'VII. Reprove not love', 'IX. When Laura smiles',
'XI. Though far from joy', here, 'XII Shall I come if I swim', and 'XVII. 'If she forsake me', below.
'XIX. Kind in unkindness'',
'XX. What then is love but mourning?', and 'XXI. Whether men do laugh or weep'.
The CD also has eight lute instrumentals on on it but I will not try to figure them out now.- April 27, 2012, P. T. C.



XII SHALL I COME IF I SWIM - by Philip Rosseter

Shal I come if I swim ? wide are thy waues you see, Shall I come if I flie my deere loue to thee ?
Streames Venus will appease, Cupid giues me wings,
All the powers assist my desire,
Saue you alone that set my wofull heart on fire.

You are faire, so was Hero that in Sestos dwelt,
She a priest, yet the heate of loue truly felt,
A greater streame then this did her loue deuide,
But she was his guide with a light,
So through the streames Leander did enioy her sight.

Online text copyright , Harald Lillmeyer [with kind permission] www.harald-lillmeyer.kulturserver.de

XII 'Shall I come if I swim' - Notes, Recordings and Comments

A recording of this song (pictured below on the right,) is on the CD; The Sypress Curtain of the Night - Elizabethan & Jacobean Lute Songs by Michael Chance (countertenor) and Christopher Wilson (lute). Rosseter's 'III. No grave for woe' and 'What then is loue but mourning?' are also on the CD as well as other works by Thomas Ford, Thomas Campion, Antony Holborne and others. (Chandos Records LTD. 1993, CHAN 0538)

Another recordings of this song by tenor James Gilchrist with Matthew Wadsworth on lute is on the CD called 'When Laura Smiles (Lute solos & songs from Elizabethan England): Works of Philip Rosseter' on AVIE Records. See the note about this CD above in the notes for'XI. Though far from joy'.
-



XIII. AY ME THAT LOVE - by Philip Rosseter

Aye me that loue should natures workes accuse,
Where cruell Laura still her beautie viewes.
Riuer or cloudie ist, or christall bright,
Are all but seruants of her selfe delight.

Yet her deformed thoughts she cannot see,
And thats the cause she is so sterne to mee,
Vertue and duetie can no fauour gaine,
A griefe, O death, to liue and loue in vaine.

'XIII. Ay me that love' - Notes, Recordings and Comments

John Jeffreys writes "The thirteenth poem 'Ay me that love' has but two verses of four lines each, and the subject again is Laura, but now she is viewed more darkly than before."*

I don't know of any recordings of this song.

The complete texts and midi files of Rosseter's & Campian's A Book of Ayres are now to be found on a site created by Harald Lillmeyer at;
http://kulturserver-bayern.de/home/harald-lillmeyer/Texte/Downloads/Liedtexte/Rosseter/LiedtexteRosseter.html



XIV. SHALL THEN A TRAITOROUS KISS - by Philip Rosseter

Shall then a traiterous kis or a smile,
All my delights vnhappily beguile ?
Shall the vow of fayned loue receiue so rich regard,
When true service dies neglected and wants his due reward ?

Deedes meritorious soone be forgot,
But one offence no time can euer blot,
Euery day it is renu'd, and euery night it bleedes,
And with bloudy streames of sorrow drowners all our better deedes.

Beautie is not by desert be woon,
Fortune hath all that is beneath the Sunne,
Fortune is the guide of loue, and both of them be blind,
All their waies are full of errors, which no true feete can find.

Online text copyright , Harald Lillmeyer www.harald-lillmeyer.kulturserver.de

XIV. Shall then a traitorous kiss - Notes, Recordings and Comments

I don't know of any recordings of this song.

The complete texts and midi files of Rosseter's & Campian's A Book of Ayres are now to be found on a site created by Harald Lillmeyer at;
http://kulturserver-bayern.de/home/harald-lillmeyer/Texte/Downloads/Liedtexte/Rosseter/LiedtexteRosseter.html



XV. IF I HOPE I PINE - by Philip Rosseter

If I hope I pine, if I feare I faint and die,
So betweene hope and feare I desp'rat lie,
Looking for ioy to heauen it should come come
But hope is blinde, ioy deafe, and I am dumbe.

Yet I speake and crie, but alas with words of wo,
And ioy conceiues not them that murmure so,
He that the eares of ioy will euer pearse,
Must sing glad noates, or speake in happier verse.

Online text copyright , Harald Lillmeyer www.harald-lillmeyer.kulturserver.de

XV. If I hope I pine - Notes, Recordings and Comments

I don't know of any recordings of this song.



XVI. UNLESS THERE WERE CONSENT - by Philip Rosseter

Vnlesse there were consent twixt hell and heauen
That grace and wickednes should be combind,
I cannot make thee and thy beauties euen,
Thy face is heauen, and torture in thy minde,
For more then worldly blisse is in thy eie,
And hellish torture in thy minde doth lie.

A thousand Cherubins flie in her lookes,
And hearts in legions melt vpon their view,
But gorgeous couers wall vp filthie bookes,
Be it sinne to saie that so your eyes do you,
But sure your mind adheres not with your eies,
For what they promise that your heart denies.

But O least I religion should misuse,
Inspire me thou that ought's thy selfe to know,
Since skillesse readers reading do abuse,
What inward meaning outward sence doth show,
For by thy eies and heart chose and contem'd
I wauer whether saued or condemn'd.

Online text copyright , Harald Lillmeyer [with kind permission] www.harald-lillmeyer.kulturserver.de

XVI. Unless there were consent - Notes, Recordings and Comments

I don't know of any recordings of this song.

The complete texts and midi files of Rosseter's & Campian's A Book of Ayres are now to be found on a site created by Harald Lillmeyer at;
http://kulturserver-bayern.de/home/harald-lillmeyer/Texte/Downloads/Liedtexte/Rosseter/LiedtexteRosseter.html



XVII. IF SHE FORSAKE ME - by Philip Rosseter

1
If she forsake me I must die,
Shall I tell her so,
Alas then strait wil she replie,
no no no no no,
If I disclose my desp'rat state
She will but make sport thereat
And more vnrelenting grow.

2
What heart can long such paines abide,
Fie vppon this loue,
I would aduenture farre and wide,
If it would remoue,
But loue will still my steppes pusue,
I cannot his wayes eschew,
Thus still helpeles hopes I proue.

3
I doe my loue in lines commend,
But alas in vaine,
The coftly gifts that I doe send,
She returnes againe,
Thus still is my despaire procur'd,
And her malice more assurd,
Then come death and end my paine.

Online text copyright , Harald Lillmeyer [with kind permission] www.harald-lillmeyer.kulturserver.de

XVII. 'If she forsake me' - Notes, Recordings and Comments

A recording of this song is on the CD; Airs & danses au temps de Shakespeare - John Elwes, tenor ; Stephen Stubbs, lute ; Musica Antiqua ; Christian Mendoze, conductor. This record also has Rossetter's 'Sweet, come again' as well as other works by William Brade, Thomas Campion, Antony Holborne, John Johnson, Thomas Morley, Francis Pilkington, etc.
Recorded Nov. 16-17, 1986.
8003/VSCCAT/ABX-1466 or 1993-10-12 Pierre Verany Records 787092

Another recording of this song is on disk; O Mistress Mine A Collection of English Lute Songs Frederick Urrey, tenor ; Ronn McFarlane, lute ; This record also has Rossetter's 'No grave for woe' as well as other works by Dowland, Campion, Morley, etc.
Dorian DOR-90136

Another recordings of this song by tenor James Gilchrist with Matthew Wadsworth on lute is on the CD called 'When Laura Smiles (Lute solos & songs from Elizabethan England): Works of Philip Rosseter' on AVIE Records.
See the note about this CD above in the notes for'XI. Though far from joy'.



Complied or written by Patrick Thomas Connolly - September, 2003
The file was from January 10, 2004 - September 3 & 4, 2011 Revision started
All materials are copyright, 2003, by Patrick Thomas Connolly
The Oxford Shakespeare Twelfth Night, Or What You Will, The Music Edited by James Walker

* 'The Life And Works of Philip Rosseter' by John Jeffreys (1990)
Roberton Publications, The Windmill, Wendover, Aylesbury HP22 6JJ.
Printed in Great Britain by Lavenham Press Ltd.

The text of 'O Mistress mine, where are you roaming?' can be found at;
http://www.poets.org/viewmedia.php/prmMID/20239


To 'A Book of Ayres' - Ayres XX to XXI.



- - - Philip Rosseter's A Book of Ayres (1601) Introduction. - - -
I. Sweet, come again
II. And would you see my mistress' face

III. No grave for woe
IV. If I urge my kind desires
V. What heart's content
'

VI. Let him that will be free
VII. Reprove not love
VIII. And would you fain the reason know

IX. When Laura smiles

X. Long have mine eyes gaz'd
XI. Though far from joy
XII Shall I come if I swim
XIII. Ay me that love
XIV. Shall then a traitorous kiss
XV. If I hope I pine
XVI. Unless there were consent
XVII. 'If she forsake me

XVIII. What is a day
XIX. Kind in unkindness'
.

XX. What then is love but mourning?
XXI. Whether men do laugh or weep


Page Bibliography

The Oxford Shakespeare Twelfth Night, Or What You Will, The Music edited by James Walker.

New Light on 'O Mistress Mine'', Renaissance News, 7 (1954), 98-100.

Songs in 'Twelfth Night' a letter from David Greer,1992 Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 3, No. 329. Friday, 20 November 1992.

A Shakespeare Music Catalogue, eds Bryan Gooch and David Thatcher, 5 vols (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1991)

The Life and Works of Philip Rosseter by John Jeffreys
Roberton Publication, 1990, The Windmill, Wendover, Aylesbury, HP22 6JJ.
Printed in Great Britain by Lavenham Press Ltd.

Edmund H. Fellowes' l922 preface to Philip Rosseter's "A Book of Ayres" (1601)



Go to Robert Jones ' The First Booke 1600, Part 1 - Airs I to III'.
Go to Robert Jones ' The First Booke 1600, Part 6 - Airs XIII to XV.'.
Go to Robert Jones ' The Second Booke 1601, Part 1 - Airs I to II'.
Go to Robert Jones ' The Second Booke 1601, Part 2 - Airs ? to ?.
Go to Robert Jones 'The Third Booke 1605, Part 1 - Airs I to IV'.
Go to Robert Jones'The Fourth Booke of Ayres 1609 , Part 1 - Airs I to II'.
Get into 'The life of Robert Jones'