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- A Brief Francis Pilkington Study - Page 3 of 3.
- Notes and Lyrics to Some of Francis Pilkington's Songs -

The First Booke of Songs - by Francis Pilkington (1605)
VI. REST, SWEET NYMPHS - Francis Pilkington's The First Booke of Songs (1605)

Rest, sweet nymphs, let golden sleep
charm thy star brighter eyes
Whilst my lute the watch doth keep
in pleasing sympathies.

Lulla lullabye, lulla lullabye,
Sleep sweetly, sleep sweetly,
let nothing afright ye,
in calm contentments lie.

Dream, fair virgins, of delight
and blest Elysian groves
while the wandering shades of night
resemble your true loves.
Lulla lullabye, lulla lullabye,
Your kisses, your blisses
send them by your wishes
although they be not nigh.

Thus, dear damsels, I do give goodnight,
and so am gone;
With your hearts' desires long live,
Still joy, and never mourn.
Lulla lullabye, lulla lullabye,
Hath pleased you and eased you,
and sweet slumber seized you --
And now to bed I hie.

Lulla lullabye, lulla lullabye,
Sleep sweetly, sleep sweetly,
let nothing afright ye,
in calm contentments lie.

VI. Rest, sweet nymphs - Notes, Recordings and Comments

This poem is typed on a web site headed "English lyrics with transations" I can not tell you more about it because I don't read Russian. If you want to see a Russian[?] translation of this lyric visit that site at - http://www.ark.ru:8101/lyrics/renessans.html

- Many recording of this song are on CDs and LPs such as;
- Boston Camerata's›What Then Is Love? - An Elizabethen›Songbook Conducted by Joel Cohen, on Erato Disques, S. A., Paris, France (3984-23417-2) 1998. This is the second Pilkington song on the CD (the other being 'XV. I sigh as sure to wear the fruit').
- A Gardin For Delights - English Lutesongs From the Renaissance Ian Partridge (tenor) and Konrad Ragossnig (lute) Ayre No.10 on the CD. 1996 - Bayer Records 100 130
- English Lute Songs Chloris Sigh'd by Mamiko Hirai (soprano) and Kenji Sano (lute), Recorded at Gifu at Salamanca Hall, Japan, September, 2000. AEolian Records, 2001, AEO-518. Tokyo, Japan.
- English Lute Songs and Six In Nomines by Alfred Deller, Desmond Dupre; The In Nomine Players
Vanguard "The Bach Guild" BG-576 [LP-mono, NA market]
Amadeo AVRS 6144 [LP-mono, Europe]
Vanguard Classics (Arcade) "The Bach Guild" 08 2038 71 [CD, Europe]
Vanguard Classics "The Bach Guild" 682 425 [CD, France]
Vanguard Classics (Arcade) "The Deller Edition" 08 5095 71 [CD, Europe]
- Airs & danses au temps de Shakespeare - John Elwes, tenor ; Stephen Stubbs, lute ; Musica Antiqua ; Christian Mendoze, conductor. Recorded Nov. 16-17, 1986.
8003/VSCCAT/ABX-1466 or 1993-10-12 Pierre Verany Records 787092
-The Lady Musick by The Consort of Musicke - Anthony Rooley, dir. (lute) Emma Kirkby (soprano), Anthony Rooley - Recording date - unknown [1979 or prior] L'Oiseau-Lyre "Florilegium" DSLO 559-1 [LP] - For more on this LP go to Early Music FAQ at - http://www.medieval.org/emfaq/cds/lol559.htm
- On the CD; Music Dear Solace to my Thoughts - Francis Pilkington: Songs from the First Booke of Ayres and Lute Solos by Bruce Scott Fithian (tenor) and Olav Chris Henriksen.


VIII. NOW LET HER CHANGE AND SPARE NOT - Francis Pilkington's The First Booke of Songs (1605)
Words by Thomas Campian - set to music by Francis Pilkington ( c.1570 - 1638 )?
1
Now let her change and spare not,
Since she proves false I care not,
Feigned love so bewitched my delight,
That still I doted on her sight.
But she is gone, but she is gone, but she is gone, new desires embracing,
And my deserts disgracing.

But she is gone, but she is gone, but she is gone, new desires embracing,
And my deserts disgracing.

2
When I did err in blindness,
Or vex her with unkindness,
If my care did attend her alone'
Why is she thus untimely gone?
True love abides, true love abides, true love abides, till the day of dying,
False love is ever flying.

True love abides, true love abides, true love abides, till the day of dying,
False love is ever flying.

3
Then false farewell for ever,
Once false prove faithful never,
He that now so triumphs in thy love,
Shall soon my present fortunes prove.
Were I as fair, were I as fair, were I as fair, as divine Adonis,
Love is not had where none is.

Were I as fair, were I as fair, were I as fair, as divine Adonis,
Love is not had where none is.

VIII. Now let her change and spare not - Notes, Recordings and Comments

In Campion's time there were three published setting of his poem, his own, Jones's and Francis Pilkington's.

Notes from English Madrigal Verse 1588-1632 by Edmund H. Fellowes and revised by Sternfeld and Greer;
"Cf. British Museum MS. Add. 29291, f. 6v
14 prove] prove 1605."

Notes from Edward Doughtie's 'Lyrics From Elizabethan Airs , 1596-1622' on Robert Jones setting;
"Campion published his owne setting of his poem in his 'Third booke of Aires' (c. 1613). ... Pilkington also composed a setting (1605. VIII) ... ... The text in Jones and Pilkington probably represents Campion's own earlier version. ...

As David Greer has shown (N & Q, CCX [1965]) Thomas Heywood parodies this song in The Rape of Lucrece (1608) ... "

Jones makes this song into a duet whereas Pilkington and Campion set it as a straight forward lute song. Jones stretches out the music, and repeats words of the last two, repeated, lines of the stanzas, whereas Campion just repeats these last two lines. Where Jones's text varies from Pilkington, I have set those words in bold lettering. You can see the Jones text on Robert Jones's third book.' Doughtie only listed the variants of the text between Jones and Campion.

Pilkington's setting of 'Now let her change and spare not' has been recorded on the CD; Music Dear Solace to my Thoughts - Francis Pilkington: Songs from the First Booke of Ayres and Lute Solos by Bruce Scott Fithian (tenor) and Olav Chris Henriksen.

I do not know of recordings of Jones's version. There is not even a recordings of Campion's setting, of his own lyrics, among the many recordings made of his songs. - P. T. C.


XIIII. THANKS GENTLE MOONE FOR THY OBSCURED LIGHT

Thanks gentle Moone for thy obscured light,
My Loue and I betraid thou set vs free,
And Zephirus as many vnto thee,
Whose blasts conceald, the pleasures of the night,
Resolue to her thou gaue, content to mee.
But be those bowers still fild with Serpents hisses,
That sought by treason, to betray our kisses.

And thou false A bor with thy bed of Rose,
Wherin, wheron toucht equall with loues fyer,
We reapt of eyther other loues desire,
Wither the triming plants that thee enclose.
[- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - [er]]
Oh be thy bowers still fild with serpents hisses,
That sought by treason, to betray our kisses.

Torne be the frame, for thou didst thankles hide,
A trayterous spy, her brother, and my foe,
Who sought by death, our ioyes to vnder goe,
And by that death, our passions to deuide,
Leauing to our great vows, eternall woe.
Oh be thy bowers still fild with serpents hisses,
That sought by treason, to betray our kisses.

XIIII. Thanks gentle Moone for thy obscured light - Notes, Recordings and Comments

I do not know of recordings of this song.

Notes from English Madrigal Verse 1588-1632 by Edmund H. Fellowes and revised by Sternfeld and Greer;

"XIV. 6-7] Compare Shakespeare, Venus and Adonis, lines 17-18:

Here come and sit, where never serpent hisses,
And being set, I'll smother thee with kisses.

11-12] A line appears to be missing from between these two lines."


XVII. DIAPHENIA - Francis Pilkington's The First Booke of Songs (1605)
Words by Henry Chettle, ( d.1607? ) - set to music by Francis Pilkington ( c.1570 - 1638 )?

Diaphenia like the daf-down-dilly
White as the sun, fair as the lilly,
Heigh ho, Heigh ho, how I do love thee.
I do love thee as my lambs
are beloved by their dams.
How blest were I if thou would prove me.
I do love thee as my lambs
are beloved by their dams.
How blest were I if thou would prove me.

Diaphenia like the spreading roses
That in thy sweets all sweets encloses,
Fair sweet, fair sweet, how I do love thee.
I do love thee as each flower
Loves the sun's life-giving power,
For dead, to life thy breath might move me.
I do love thee as each flower
Loves the sun's life-giving power,
For dead, to life thy breath might move me.

Diaphenia like to all things blessed,
When all thy praises are expressed,
Dear joy, dear joy how I do love tee.
As the birds do love the spring
Or bees their careful king,
Then in requite, sweet virgin, love me.
As the birds do love the spring
Or bees their careful king,
Then in requite, sweet virgin, love me.

Source ; The CD; Ars Britanica by Pro Cantione Antiqua (1980)

XVII. Diaphenia, like the daffdowndilly - Notes, Recordings and Comments

- A recording of this song is on the CD; Ars Britanica by Pro Cantione Antiqua (1980), on Teldec Classics (Telefunken 6.35494). This is a beautiful recording of this gorgeous song.

Another recording of this piece is on the CD; Music Dear Solace to my Thoughts - Francis Pilkington: Songs from the First Booke of Ayres and Lute Solos by Bruce Scott Fithian (tenor) and Olav Chris Henriksen.

On Fithian and Henriksen's CD they use only lute and voice and so they cannot compare very well to the many voices and instruments of Pro Cantione Antiqua. Pilkington did make his songs to be played by either solo voice and instrument or for about four voices, lute and viol or any way a musician pleased. Fithian and Henriksen's version of this song is simple and very nice.

I think Fithian and Henriksen's CD is the first and only CD dedicated entirely to Pilkington. It is a wonderful CD but since they use only lute and voice this CD cannot sound all the breadth and beauty of Pilkington's works. Notes from English Madrigal Verse 1588-1632 by Edmund H. Fellowes and revised by Sternfeld and Greer.

"This poem was printed in England's Helicon, 1600 (Rollins, i, p. 96), subscribed with the initials 'H. C.' It used to be thought that these initials represented Henry Constable, but, as Rollins has shown (The Times Literary Supplement, 1st Oct., 1931), they almost certainly belong to Henry Chettle.


XX. WITH FRAGRANT FLOWERS WE STEW THE WAY

With fragrant flowers we strew the way,
And make this our chiefe holy day,
For though this Clime were blest of yore,
Yet was it neuer proud before:
O gracious King, of second Troy,
Accept of our vnfained ioy.

Now th'Aire is sweeter then sweet Balme,
And Satires daunce about the Palme:
Now earth with verdure newly dight,
Giues perfect signes of her delight.
O gracious King of second Troy,
Accept of our vnfained ioy.

Now Birds record new harmonie,
And trees doe whistle melodie:
Now euery thing that Nature breeds
Doth clad it selfe in pleasant weeds.
O gracious King of second Troy,
Accept of our vnfained ioy.

XX. With fragrant flow'rs we strew the way - Notes, Recordings and Comments

Notes from English Madrigal Verse 1588-1632 by Edmund H. Fellowes and revised by Sternfeld and Greer;

"This poem by Thomas Watson is from The Honourable Entertainment given to the Queen's Majesty . . . at Elvetham . . . 1591 (reprinted by R. W. Bond, John Lyly, i, P. 431). It was sung on that occasion by six virgins, three representing the Graces, and three the Hours, who walked before the Queen strewing flowers. The poem was also printed in England's Helicon. 1600 (Rollins, i, p. 46). Pilkington has altered Watson's refrain, which is as follows:

O beauteous Queen of second Troy
Accept of our unfeigned joy.

This refrain is very similar to the one in Byrd's madrigal 'This sweet and merry month of May' (Watson 1590, VIII and XXVIII, and Byrd 1611, IX)."


XXI. Come, come all you that draw heauens purest breath
(An Elegie in remembrance of his Worshipfull friend Thomas Leighton Esquier. ) - Notes, Recordings and Comments

?"Come all ye" A recording of this song is on the LP; The Lady Musick by The Consort of Musicke - Anthony Rooley, dir. (lute) Emma Kirkby (soprano), Anthony Rooley. Recording date - unknown [1979 or prior] L'Oiseau-Lyre "Florilegium" DSLO 559-1 [LP]
For more on this LP go to Early Music FAQ at - http://www.medieval.org/emfaq/cds/lol559.htm

Notes from English Madrigal Verse 1588-1632 by Edmund H. Fellowes and revised by Sternfeld and Greer;

Thomas Leighton probably belonged to the Shropshire family of that name, another member of which was Sir William Leighton, the composer and poet, and editor of the volume entitled The Tears or Lamentations of a sorrowful Soul, published in 1614.


All materials are copyright © Patrick Thomas Connolly, 2004 &2005.
Written & compiled by Patrick T. Connolly, © Last update January 4 & 5 2005.

Sir William Leighton's Tears or Lamentations of a Sorrowful Soul (1614)

20. Hidden, O Lord, are my most horrid sins. - Words by Sir William Leighton - Set by Francis Pilkington

HIDDEN, O LORD, ARE MY MOST HORRID SINS,

Hidden, O Lord, are my most horrid sins.
Unto the world though open plain to thee:
He never betters that no time begins,
Corruption killeth all good thought in me.



Second Set of Madrigals - by Francis Pilkington (1624)
'virtually the last significant [Madrigal] publication*' The English Madrigalists, Volume 26.
London: Stainer & Bell,
Of Four Voices

VII. MENALCAS IN AN EUENING WALKING WAS

Menalcas in an euening walking was
With Daphne, his beloued louely lasse, (louely lasse,)
She weepes, and doth of Cupid oft complaine,
But comfort Daphne, said the iolly swain,
'Come kisse me sweet and let vs merry be, (and let vs merry, merry be,)
The gods are crossed in loue as well as we.'


XII. YOU GENTLE NYMPHS THAT ON THESE MEADOWES PLAY

You gentle Nymphs that on these meadowes play,
And oft relate the loues of Shepheards young,
Come, (come, come) sit you downe, (come sit you, sit you downe,) for if you please to stay,
Now may you heare an vncouth passion song,
A Lad there is, and I am that poore groome,
That's falne in loue, and can not tell, and can not tell with whom.

Here endeth the Songs of foure Parts.

XII. You gentle nymphs that on these meadowes play - Notes, Recordings and Comments

I do not know of recordings of this song.
Notes from English Madrigal Verse 1588-1632 by Edmund H. Fellowes and revised by Sternfeld and Greer;

"XII. This poem by George Wither is from Fair-Virtue, 1622, lines 4273-8 (F. Sidgwick, The Poetry of George Wither, 1902, ii, p. 155)."


Of Five Voices

XIII. CHASTE SYRINX FLED, FEAR HASTING ON HER PACE

Chast Syrinx fled (chast Syrinx fled,) feare hasting on her pace, (hasting, hasting on her pace,)
With loosed haire, and teare bedewed face, (and teare bedewed face,)
Wearie God wot, And Pan behinde her, (and Pan behinde, and Pan behinde her) nye, (Pan behinde her nye,)
She fills the woods with many a drery, (drery) cry,
The gods did see, and seeme her case to mourne,
And into reeds, her dainty, dainty limbs transforme,
So now she makes, (she makes, so now she makes) most ioyous, ioyous melody,
For ioy she kept her lou'd virginitie.


XVII. O GRACIOUS GOD, PARDON MY GREAT OFFENCE,

O gratious God, pardon, (pardon) my great offence,
(pardon, pardon my great, my great offence, O pardon my great offence,)
Increase my faith, renue thy spirit, (thy spirit) of grace, (renue thy spirit of grace,)
Inuest me with thy Christ his innocence,
And from me Lord, turne not away thy face,
Let not my sinnes foule, (foule, many,) many, though they be, (they be,)
Make a diuorse betweene thy grace, and me.


XVIII. GO, YOU SKIPPING KIDS AND FAWNS

Goe you skipping, (skipping, skipping) Kids and Fawnes,
Exercise your swift carriere,
Ouer pleasant fields and lawnes,
Rousing, (rousing, rousing vp, rousing vp, rousing) vp the fearefull Deere,
(fearefull Deere, the feareful Deere, fearefull Deere,)
Greet them all with what I sing,
Endlesse, (endlesse, endlesse) loue eternizing, (eternizing.)
Greet them all with what I sing,
Endlesse, endlesse, endlesse loue, eternizing, eternizing.


Of Five Voices

XIX. CARE FOR THY SOUL AS THING OF GREATEST PRICE

Care for thy soul as thing of greatest price,
Made to the end to taste of power divine,
Devoid of guilt, abhorring sin and vice,
Apt by God's grace to virtue to incline.
Care for it so, as by thy retchless train,
It be not brought to taste eternal pain.

Source ; The CD; Ars Britanica by Pro Cantione Antiqua (1980)

XIX. Care For Thy Soul - A recording of this song is on the CD; Ars Britanica by Pro Cantione Antiqua (1980), on Teldec Classics (Telefunken 6.35494).


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Page Bibliography

$ English Madrigal Verse 1588-1632 by Edmund H. Fellowes. Revised & Enlarged by Fredrick W. Sternfeld and David Greer. 3rd Edition 1967, Oxford at the Clarendon Press. (1st ed. 1920. 2st ed. 1929.)

Edward Doughtie's 'Lyrics From Elizabethan Airs , 1596-1622' Cambridge, Mass. Harvard University Press, 1970.

Greaves (1604, III) and John Danyel (1606, I) A site created by Harald Lillmeyer that can be found at; http://kulturserver-bayern.de/home/harald-lillmeyer
Look under 'Downloads'.

English Song-Books 1651-1702 by Cyrus Lawrence Day and Eleanore Boswell Murrie, London 1940.

Old English Popular Music by William Chappell, revised by H. Ellis Wooldridge, 2 vols., London, 1893 (reprinted New York, 1961).

*Chris Whent, Producer of the 'Here Of A Sunday Morning' website for WBAI 99.5 FM .120 Wall Street, New York, NY 10005. http://www.hoasm.org/IVM/

Early Music FAQ - at http://www.medieval.org/emfaq/cds/tld46004.htm

% Julia Craig-McFeely's Thesis http://www.cs.dartmouth.edu/~wbc/julia/ap1/ap1pre.htm