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The First Set of Madrigals 1607 [26 pieces]
Composed by Robert Jones
Part 5 - Madrigals XVIII. to XXVI.

Go back to Part 4 - Madrigals XIII to XVII (Songs for five voices).
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Songs for five voices

XVIII. IF I BEHOLD YOUR EYES (Lyric by Francis Davison (b. circa 1575))

If I behold your eyes
Love is a paradise;
But if I view my heart
'Tis an enfernal smart.

18. If I behold your eyes - Notes and Comments

Only fragments of this madrigal survive and it cannot be reconstructed very accurately and thus the music is not in Fellowes' 'Volume XXXV'.
Notes from Edmond Fellowes 'English Madrigal Verse'
XVIII. By Francis Davison. Printed in A Poetical Rhapsody, l602 (Rollins ???) Translated from Guarini, Il pastor fido, II. ii:

Silvio. Che cosa e questo amore?
Dorinda. S'i' miro il tuo bel viso,
Amore e un paradiso;
Ma S'i' miro il mio core,
E un infernal ardore.



XIX. SINCE YOUR SWEET CHEERY LIPS I KISSED

Since your sweet cheery lips I kissed
No want of food I once have mist ;
My stomach now no meat requires,
My throat no drink at all desires ;
For by your breath, which then I gained,
Chameleon-like my life's maintained.

XX. THEN GRANT ME, DEAR, THOSE CHERRIES (the second part)

Then grant me, dear, those cherries still,
O let me feed on them my fill;
If by a surfeit death I get,
Upon my tomb let this be set:
Here lieth he whom cherries two
Made both to live and life forgo.

19. Since your sweet cheery lips I kissed (the first part). &
20. Then grant me, dear, those cherries still (the second part) - Notes and Comments

Only fragments of these madrigals survive so no music, in modern notation, has been printed.
Notes from Edmond Fellowes' 'English Madrigal Verse'
XIX-XX. Poem by Francis Davison. Printed in A Poetical Rhapsody, l602 (Rollins p.66).
6 Chameleon-like my life's maintained] Chameleon-like my life maintained C B. T.? The chameleon was believed to live on air instead of food. See Pliny's Natural History, XI. 31.



XXI. STAY, WANDERING THOUGHTS

Stay wandering thoughts, O whither do you hast?
Leave off your mourning,
Rest is returning,
Joy is at hand and heavy sorrows past.
Down fall your fears ;
Hope highly rears.
Ah, then rejoice and never cease to sing.

21. Stay wandering thoughts, O whither do you hast? - Notes and Comments

Only fragments of this madrigal survive.
Notes from Edmond Fellowes' 'English Madrigal Verse'
XXI. 1 haste] fly C.



Songs for six voices

XXII. YOUR PRESENCE BREEDS MY ANGUISH

Your presence breeds my anguish,
Your absence makes me languish,
Your sight with woe doth fill me,
And want of your sight, alas, doth kill me.

22. Your presence breeds my anguish (the first part) - Notes and Comments
This madrigal survives in Manuscript II 4109, in the Brussels Royal Library but the second and third parts were not preserved there, and so only the music of this first part, of this Francis Davison poem,

XXIII. If those dear eyes that burn me, (the second part)

If those dear eyes that burn me,
With mild aspect you turn me,
For life my weak heart panteth;
If frowningly, my spirit and life-blood faintet.

XXIV. If thou speak kindly to me, (the third part)

If thou speak kindly to me,
Alas, kind words undo me ;
Yet silence doth dislike me
And one unkind ill word stark dead will strike me.

23. If those dear eyes that burn me, (the second part)
24. If thou speak kindly to me (the third part) - Notes and Comments

Only fragments of these two madrigals survive. The Cantus and Bassus parts on these six part madrigals are available in facsimile edition of this book. However they cannot be reconstructed very accurately and thus the music is not in Fellowes' 'Volume XXXV'.
Notes from Edmond Fellowes' 'English Madrigal Verse';
XXII-XXIV. Poem by Francis Davison. Printed in A Poetical Rhapsody, 1602 (Rollins, p. 68) with one more stanza.



Songs for seven voices.

XXV. ARE LOVERS FULL OF FIRE? (the first part)

Are lovers full of fire?
How comes it then my verses are so cold?
And how, when I come nigh her
And fit occasion wills me to be bold.

Songs for eight voices

XXVI. THE MORE I BURN, THE MORE I DO DESIRE (the second part)

The more I burn, the more I do desire,
The less I dare require?
Ah, Love, thus is thy wondeous art
And freeze the tougue and fire the heart.

25. Are lovers full of fire? (the first part) &
26. The more I burn, the more I do desire (the second part) - Notes and Comments

Lyric by Francis Davison (b. circa 1575).

Notes from Edmond Fellowes 'English Madrigal Verse'
XXV - XXVI. Poem by Francis Davison. Printed in A Poetical Rhapsody, 1602 ... p. 89).

Notes from Edmond Fellowes 'Notes' to Volume XXXV (1924) (Jones' Madrigal book).;
Printed as "Madrigal No. 10" in the "Poetical Rhapsody."
Comments from Edmond Fellowes' Preface to Volume XXXV. (1924);
Nos. 25 and 26 of the Set, which are in seven and eight parts, are to be found complete in manuscript part-books in the Bodleian Library (Bodl. MS. Musi 25-28). These books belonged to one '' Thomas Hamond of Cresners in the parish of Hawksden in the County of Suffolk. He has added a note that they would have cost 'printed 3s. 4d. at the least.'''

Craig Monson* lists the contents of 'Bodl. MS. Musi 25-28 and says " ... ". Jones' madrigal is followed by a William Bird composition.

Bodleian MSS Mus. F 25 - 28

Call to remembrance - J. Hilton
Phillis, I fain I would die - T. Morley - published in 1595 #21
Cantate Domino - J. Tomkins
Are lovers full of fire? (part 1) - R. Jones - published in 1607 #25.
Inclina Domine - R. Ramsey
You blessed bowers - J. Farmer - published in 1599 #17
The more I burn, the more (part 2) - R. Jones - published in 1607 #26.
Diliges Dominun - W. Byrd - published in CS1575 #25
Mio cor, mio bene - B. Ratti



This page was written & compiled by Patrick Connolly.
All materials are copyright Patrick Thomas Connolly 2003 & 2004.
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Page Bibliography

* p. 118, Voices and Viols in England, 1600-1650 by Craig Monson, UMI Reserch Press, Ann Arbor Miichigan.

Edmond Fellowes 'English Madrigal Verse';

Robert Jones; First Set of Madrigals, English Madrigalist Series, Volume 35A. (0979 6.) Transcribed, Scored and Edited. London: Stainer & Bell, in the 1924.