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The First Set of Madrigals 1607 [26 pieces]
Composed by Robert Jones
Part 4 - Madrigals XIII. to XVII.

Return to Part 3 - The songs that are in number but four parts - Madrigals VII to XII.
Go ahead to Part 5 - Madrigals XVIII toXXVI (Songs for five, six, seven and eight voices).
Songs for five voices

XIII. COME DOLEFUL OWL

Come doleful owl. the messenger of woe,
Melancholy's bird, companion of Despair,
Sorrow's best friend and Mirth's professed foe
The chief discourser that delights sad Care.
O come, poor owl, and tell thy woes to me.
Which having heard, I'll do the like for thee.

Source ; Robert Jones; First Set of Madrigals, English Madrigalist Series, Volume 35A. Transcribed, Scored and Edited. London: Stainer & Bell, in 1924.

13. Come doleful owl. the messenger of woe, - Notes, Recordings and Comments

This madrigal survives in Manuscript II 4109, in the Brussels Royal Library. The author of this poem is unknown. There are no notes about this madrigal in Fellowes' 'English Madrigal Verse' or in 'Volume XXXV'.

I don't know of any recording of this madrigal nor do I know of any recordings of any of the 26 madrigal in this entire book. The only madrigal by Jones that is on disc is his well recorded Oriana madrigal.



XIV. 14. SWEET, WHEN THOU SINGEST, (the first part)

Sweet, when thou singest I'll leave my careful nest.
Thou giv'st me warning that my foes do sleep.
The silent night befits our sorrows best
The chattering day-birds can no counsel keep.

14. Sweet, when thou singest, l'll Ieave my careful nest (the first part) - Notes and Comments

This madrigal survives in Manuscript II 4109, in the Brussels Royal Library. There are no notes about this madrigal in Fellowes 'English Madrigal Verse' or in 'Volume XXXV'.

XV. THOU TELLEST THY SORROWS (the second part)

Thou tellest thy sorrows in a soft sweet note,
But I proclaim them with the loudest throat.
But we, poor fools, when the fair morn doth come
Would fainest speak, but sorrow strikes us dumb.

15. Thou tellest thy sorrows in a soft sweet note, (the second part) - Notes and Comments

Only fragments of this madrigal survive and so the music is not in Fellowes' 'Volume XXXV'. The author of this poem is unknown. There are no notes about this madrigal in Fellowes' 'English Madrigal Verse' or in 'Volume XXXV'.



XVI. When To Her Lute Corida Sings (the first part) (by Thomas Campion)

When to her lute Corrina sings,
Her voice reuiues the leaden stringes,
And doth in highest noates appeare,
As any challeng'd eccho cleere ;
But when she doth of mourning speake,
Eu'n with her sighes the strings do breake.

XVII. And as her lute doth live and die, (the second part [of When To Her Lute Corinna Sings by Thomas Campion])

And as her lute doth liue or die,
Led by her passion, so must I,
For when of pleasure she doth sing,
My thoughts enioy a sodaine spring,
But if she doth of sorrow speake,
Eu'n from my hart the strings doe breake.

Source: Campion, Thomas. Campion's Works. Percival Vivian, Ed. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1909. 10.
This copy comes from the Luminarium site created by Anniina Jokinen. http://www.luminarium.org/renlit/

16 - 17. When To Her Lute Corinna Sings - Notes and Comments

Unfortunately only the two bottom parts of these madrigals survive and it cannot be reconstructed very accurately.
Line 11 doth] 'Volume XXXV' do

Notes from Edmond Fellowes' 'English Madrigal Verse'
XVI-XVII. Poem by Campian, and set to music by him (Rosseter, l601, P?? VI ) Also printed in A Poetical Rhapsody, l602 (Rollins, i, p. 216).
5 But] And B.

The lyrics of Campian's 'When To Her Lute Corida Sings' were set by Campian himself, in 'Part I' of Rossetter's 'A Booke of Ayres' (1601). Robert Jones reset this poem to his own music. The first verse is madrigal XVI. When To Her Lute Corida Sings and the second verse is madrigal XVII. And As Her Lute Doth Live And Die. Jones's setting of 'When To Her Lute Corida,' as a madrigal, would offer something very different from Campion's lute song. Setting a popular lyric to a new tune was often done in those times.

Jones's source for this lyric could be 'A Poetical Rhapsody' (1602) where this lyric, along with many other lyrics that Jones set, in this madrigal book and Jones's third book are found. However in line 5 Jones uses 'but' where A Poetical Rhapsody uses 'and' --. Jones was likely familiar with the Rossetter book but it is posible that some of Jones's madrigals go back before 1601 when the Rossetter book was published.

Rossetter says in his dedication that these songs of Campian were "priuately emparted to his friends, whereby they grew both publicke, and (as coine crackt in exchange corrupted: some of them both words and notes vnrespectiuely challenged by others."

In Rossetter Book's the 'To The Reader' address, that is thought by many to have been written by Thomas Campian, it reads "What Epigrams are in Poetrie, the same are Ayres in musicke, then in their chiefe perfection when they are short and well seasoned. But to clogg a light song with long Preludium, is to corrupt the nature of it."

Perhaps they where talking party about this long, five voice madrigal by Jones. There are few other examples of musical settings of Campion's poem from the Rosseter book.

A midi file of Campian's 'When To Her Lute Corida Sings' as well as the complete texts and accurate midi files of Rosseter's & Campian's A Book of Ayres can be found on a site created by Harald Lillmeyer at; http://kulturserver-bayern.de/home/harald-lillmeyer. Look under 'Downloads'.



This page was written & compiled by Patrick Connolly.
All materials are copyright Patrick Thomas Connolly 2003 & 2004.
Go ahead to Part 5 - Madrigals XVIII toXXVI (Songs for five, six, seven and eight voices).
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