Go back to 'The Complete Works Of Robert Jones'.
Return to ' this Philip Rosseter and Robert Jones web site's primary page '.
Go back to ' The Phreap Site '.

Return to ' The First Booke 1600, Part 1 - Airs I to III'.
Return to ' The Second Booke 1601, Part 1 - Airs I to II'.
Return to 'The Third Booke 1605, Part 1 - Airs I to IV'.
Return to 'The Fourth Booke of Ayres 1609 , Part 1 - Airs I to II'.

Get into 'The life of Robert Jones' Find the Life of Philip Rosseter

Go to ' The Complete Works Of Philip Rosseter - Part 3a. - Works of Philip Rosseter found only in Manuscripts' &
Part 3b. - Philip Rosseter; The Arranger of Thomas Campion's Songs

A page about Thomas Morley.'s 'Triumphs Of Oriana'.
My page on the Works of Richard Allison.
To Francis Pilkington's Life , Pilkington's Works or Pilkington's Lyrics



Part 5 - Ayres ?XI?. to XIII?.
- Go back to 'The Fifth Booke, Part 1 - Airs I to III'
Go back to 'The Fifth Booke, Part 2 - Ayres IV?. to VI'.
Go back to ' The Fifth Booke, Part 3 - Airs VII. to VIII. '
Go back to ' The Fifth Booke, Part 4 - Airs IX. to X. '
Go ahead to ' The Fifth Booke, Part 6 - Airs XIV to XXI '


The muses gardin for delights or fifth booke of ayers, 1610 onely for the lute, bas-vyoll, and the voyce ... printed by the assignes of William Barley.
by Robert Jones
(Dedicated to Lady Mary (Sidney) Wroth (1587?-1651?))


Written & compiled by Patrick T. Connolly, ©
This page was revised, written & compiled on November 23 and 24, 2003.
Updated August 9, 2005 March 15 & 22, 2009.
First posted as Part 1 March 22, 2009 - this page was just thrown up quickly and has been divided into smaller Parts.
August 2 & 3, 2010 divided into smaller Parts.







This is the 400 year anniversary of Robert Jones's 5th (& last) booke ["The muses gardin for delights or fifth booke of ayers, 1610], and this is one of the 21 songs of the book. In celebration I have recorded this song in this anniversary year - mostly.


Under Construction.
This is an unfinished page that I hope to edit sometime in the future.

Written & compiled by Patrick T. Connolly, ©
This page was revised, written & compiled on November 23 and 24, 2003.
Updated August 9, 2005 March 15 & 22, 2009.
First posted as Part 1 March 22, 2009 - this page is just thrown up quickly and may be divided into smaller Parts.
A bit of this has been up on Part ? - Ayres XIV. to XXI? (XIV. THERE WAS A WILY LAD) which has a reproduction of the originally published song.
This page was last updated August 2 - 5, 2010 - in celebration of the 400 year anniversary of this last booke - 1610 - 2010.




XI. ONCE DID MY THOUGHTS BOTH EBB AND FLOW

Once did my thoughts both ebbe and flowe,
As passion did them mooue,
Once did I hope, straight feare againe,
And then I was in Loue.

Once did I waking spend the night,
And told how many minutes mooue,
Once did I wishing waste the day,
And then I was in loue.

Once by my caruing true loues knot,
The weeping trees did proue,
That wounds and teares were both our lots,
And then I was in loue.

Once did I breath an others breath,
And in my mistris moue,
Once was I not mine owne at all,
And then I was in loue.

Once woare I bracelets made of hayre,
And collers did aproue,
Once were my clothes made out of waxe,
And then I was in loue.

Once did I Sonnet to my Saint,
My soule in number mou'd,
Once did I tell a thousand lies,
And then in trueth I lou'd.

Once in my eare did dangling hang,
A little turtle Doue,
Once in a word I was a foole,
And then I was in loue.

XI. Once did my thoughts both ebb and flow - Notes, Recordings and Comments

(Here on this MP3 I sing the 1st stanza and the 7th stanza.)
In 2010, in celebration of the 400 year anniversary of this last booke 1610 - I recorded this song myself.

I have spliced 'Take 2 & 3' together. On 'Take 2' I do the 1st stanza and on 'Take 3' I do the 7th stanza. It was all recorded in August of 2010.

In 1888 the poem was first re-published in More lyrics from the song-books of the Elizabethan Age edited by A. H. Bullen. At this time the music book was still lost.
Bullen writes "Surely this is the very perfection of song-writing. No less perfect, in a sprightlier vein, is the sobered lover's humorous description of the life he had led under love's thraldom : "

http://www.archive.org/stream/morelyricsfromso00bullrich#page/x/mode/2up

Notes from Edward Doughtie's 'Lyrics From Elizabethan Airs , 1596-1622 ';
21. bracelets made of hayre., Love tokens. Cf. Donne, "The Funerall" and "The Relique."
23. clothes made out of waxe. I.e. clothes so scrupulously neat as to seem modeled out of wax. Cf. OED, wax 3.c., and Romeo and Juliet, I.iii. 76, "Why he's a man of wax".




XII. I am so far from pitying thee

I am so farre from pittving thee,
That wear'st a branch of VVillow tree,
That I doe enuie thee and all,
that once was high & got a fall,
O willow willow willo tree
I would than didst belong to mee.

Thy wearing willow doth imply,
That thou art happier farre then I,
For once thou wert where thou wouldst be,
Though now thou wear'st the Willow tree,
O Willow willow sweete willow,
Let me once lie vpon her pillow.

I doe defie both bough and roote,
And all the friends of hell to boote,
One houre of Paradised ioye,
Makes Purgatorie seeme a toye,
O willow willow doe thy worst,
Thou canst not make me more accurst.

I haue spent all my golden time,
In writing many a louing rime,
I haue consumed all my youth,
In vowing of my faith and trueth.
O willow willow willow tree,
Yet can I not beleeued bee.

And now alas it is too late,
Gray hayres the messenger of fate,
Bids me to set my heart at rest,
For beautie loueth yong men best,
O willow willo I must die,
Thy seruants happier farre then I.

XII. I am so far from pitying thee - Notes, Recordings and Comments

I don't know of any recording of this song but there is a midi file available from Mr. Harald Lillmeyer's site. - P. T. C

Notes from Edward Doughtie's 'Lyrics From Elizabethan Airs , 1596-1622 ';



XIII. As I lay lately in a dream

As I lay lately in a dreame,
Me thought I saw a wonderous thing,
A woman faire transformed was
Into a Fidle, without a string,
A Metamorphosis so rare,
As all most made mee wake for feare,
O this is rare, yea verie rare,
A wonderous thing so faire a Fidle
Didle, didle didle, a fidle didle,
So faire a Fidle should want a string.

Till honest neighbours dwelling nigh,
Said they would all her wants supply,
And said that they haue strings in store,
For such a Fidle and fortie more,
For loue they beare vnto the sport,
Theyle make her fit for the consort.
O this is rare,
Yea, very rare.
Theyle send her first to some that can,
Put in the peg, and peg her than,

If that her bridge be broken so,
As that the Fidle cannot go,
Theyle soone deuise some other way,
To make her sound the round-delay.
O this is rare,
Yea very rare,
When they haue set her in the keye,
You must not straine her strings so high,
For feare the Fidle chance to crake,
Nor let the strings be too too slacke,

The Diapason is her sound,
The lowest note is most profound.
O this is rare,
Yea very rare.
But note a discord in Musicke,
To sound some Note without the pricke,
And then for keeping of your moode,
Sing three to one thats passing good,
Of all the Notes in Gamuet scale,
The Long is that which must not faile.
O this is rare.
Yea very rare.

XIII. As I lay lately in a dream - Notes, Recordings and Comments

William Shakespeare Sonnet 128

http://www.shakespeares-sonnets.com/128comm.htm

CXXVIII.

How oft, when thou, my music, music play'st,
Upon that blessed wood whose motion sounds
With thy sweet fingers, when thou gently sway'st
The wiry concord that mine ear confounds,
Do I envy those jacks that nimble leap
To kiss the tender inward of thy hand,
Whilst my poor lips, which should that harvest reap,
At the wood's boldness by thee blushing stand!
To be so tickled, they would change their state
And situation with those dancing chips,
O'er whom thy fingers walk with gentle gait,
Making dead wood more blest than living lips.
Since saucy jacks so happy are in this,
Give them thy fingers, me thy lips to kiss.

There are a couple of recordings

Notes from Edward Doughtie's 'Lyrics From Elizabethan Airs , 1596-1622 ';

The emphasis here seems to be on the second rather than on the first entendre; consequently some of the musical terms are confusing, ...

http://kulturserver-bayern.de/home/harald-lillmeyer/Texte/Downloads/Downloads.html XIII. As I lay lately in a dream - Publishing History

????1927-31 - Elizabethan and Jacobean English ayres, . Vo1. I-VI. Trans. and edited from the original edition by Peter Warlock and Philip Wilson. London: OUP, 1927-31.



Source ; A site created by Harald Lillmeyer. Mr. Lillmeyer typed the text from a facsimile on the 1610 booke and preserved the original spelling.
This site can be found at; http://kulturserver-bayern.de/home/harald-lillmeyer/Texte/Downloads/Downloads.html


More lyrics from the song-books of the Elizabethan Ageedited by A. H. Bullen

Lyrics From Elizabethan Airs , 1596-1622 by Edward Doughtie

A site called "Heigh! Nonny Nonny! Welcome to British Song!" at: http://www.public.asu.edu/~icwwh/#SEC4 - gives this information;

My Love Hath Her True Love Betrayed. Why, Četis a fault that is too common ( [Fifth Booke 1610 #16]) Allegretto - G - 4 / 4 Anonymous Tenor or baritone / G3 - F4 Piano Stainer / English Lute Songs 2 ( ed. Pilkington ) ? Pg. 66 of collection.


Source ; A site created by Harald Lillmeyer. Mr. Lillmeyer typed the text from a facsimile on the 1610 booke and preserved the original spelling.
This site can be found at; http://kulturserver-bayern.de/home/harald-lillmeyer/Texte/Downloads/Downloads.html


- Go back to 'The Fifth Booke, Part 1 - Airs I to ?III'
Go back to 'The Fifth Booke, Part 2 - Ayres ?IV?. to VI?'.
Go back to ' The Fifth Booke, Part 3 - Airs ?VII?. to VIII?. '
Go back to ' The Fifth Booke, Part 4 - Airs ?IX?. to X?. '
Go ahead to ' The Fifth Booke, Part ? - Airs XIV to XXI '

Return to ' The First Booke 1600, Part 1 - Airs I to III'.
Return to ' The Second Booke 1601, Part 1 - Airs I to II'.
Return to 'The Third Booke 1605, Part 1 - Airs I to IV'.
Return to 'The Fourth Booke of Ayres 1609 , Part 1 - Airs I to II'.

Get into 'The life of Robert Jones'
Find the Life of Philip Rosseter


Written & compiled by Patrick T. Connolly, ©
This page was revised, written & compiled on November 23 and 24, 2003.
Updated August 9, 2005 March 15 & 22, 2009.
First posted as Part 1 March 22, 2009 and now divided into Part 2 - this page is just thrown up quickly and may be divided into smaller Parts. This page was last updated March 2, 2011. it was also worked on - August 2 - 5, October 24 & November 5th, 2010 - in celebration of the 400 year anniversary of this last booke - 1610 - 2010.