Go back to 'The Complete Works Of Robert Jones'.
Return to ' this Philip Rosseter and Robert Jones web site's primary page '.
Go back to ' The Phreap Site '.

Return to ' The First Booke 1600, Part 1 - Airs I to III'.
Return to ' The Second Booke 1601, Part 1 - Airs I to II'.
Return to 'The Third Booke 1605, Part 1 - Airs I to IV'.
Return to 'The Fourth Booke of Ayres 1609 , Part 1 - Airs I to II'.

Get into 'The life of Robert Jones'
Find the Life of Philip Rosseter

Go to ' The Complete Works Of Philip Rosseter - Part 3a. - Works of Philip Rosseter found only in Manuscripts' &
Part 3b. - Philip Rosseter; The Arranger of Thomas Campion's Songs

A page about Thomas Morley.'s 'Triumphs Of Oriana'.
My page on the Works of Richard Allison.

To Francis Pilkington's Life , Pilkington's Works or Pilkington's Lyrics


The muses gardin for delights or fifth booke of ayers, 1610
by Robert Jones
(Dedicated to Lady Mary (Sidney) Wroth (1587?-1651?))
Part 2 - Ayres ?IV?. to VI?.
- Go back to 'The Fifth Booke, Part 1 - Airs I to ?III'
Go ahead to ' The Fifth Booke, Part 3 - Airs ?VII?. to VIII?. '
Go ahead to ' The Fifth Booke, Part 4 - Airs ?IX?. to X?. '
Go ahead to 'The Fifth Booke, Part 5 - Airs ?XI?. to XIII?. '
Go ahead to ' The Fifth Booke, [last] Part ? - Airs XIV to XXI '


Under Construction.
This is an unfinished page that I hope to edit sometime in the future.

Written & compiled by Patrick T. Connolly, ©
This page was revised, written & compiled on November 23 and 24, 2003.
Updated August 9, 2005 March 15 & 22, 2009.
First posted as Part 1 March 22, 2009, and now divided into Part 2 - this page is just thrown up quickly and may be divided into smaller Parts.
A bit of this has been up on Part ? - Ayres XIV. to XXI? (XIV. THERE WAS A WILY LAD) which has a reproduction of the originally published song.
This page was updated August 2 - 5, 2010 - in celebration of the 400 year anniversary of this last booke - 1610 - 2010. Last updated October 24, 2010.



The muses gardin for delights or fifth booke of ayers, 1610 onely for the lute, bas-vyoll, and the voyce ... printed by the assignes of William Barley.
by Robert Jones
(Dedicated to Lady Mary (Sidney) Wroth (1587?-1651?))




Written & compiled by Patrick T. Connolly, ©
This page was revised, written & compiled on November 23 and 24, 2003.
Updated August 9, 2005 March 15 & 22, 2009.
First posted as Part 1 March 22, 2009 - this page is just thrown up quickly and may be divided into smaller Parts.
August 2 & 3, 2010 divided into smaller Parts.

IV. The fountains Smoke

The fountaines smoake, And yet no flames they shewe,
Starres shine all night Though vndesern'd by day,
And trees doe spring, yet are not seene to growe,
And shadowes mooue, Although they seeme to stay,
In Winters woe, Is buried Summers blisse,
And Loue loues most, when loue most secret is.
The stillest streames descries the greatest deepe,
The clearest skie is subiect to a shower,
Conceit's most sweete, when as it seemes to sleepe,
And fairest dayes doe in the morning lower,
The silent Groues sweete Nimphs they cannot misse,
For loue loues most, where loue most secret is.
The rarest Jewels, hidden vertue yeeld,
The sweete of traffique, is a secret gaine,
The yeere once old doth shew a barren field,
And Plants seeme dead, and yet they spring againe,
Cupid is blind, the reason why, is this,
Loue loueth most, where loue most secret is.



V. Walking by the river side

Walking by a Riuerside,
In prime of Summers morning,
Viewing Phoebus in his pride,
The siluer streames adorning,
And passing on my selfe alone,
Me thought I heard a wofull grone.
Still I stood as one amaz'd,
To heare this wofull crying,
Round about me then I gaz'd,
In euery Meddow prying.
Yet could I not this wight surprise,
Although the voice did pierce the skies.
Venus thou hast kild my heart,
And quite my soule confounded,
Thy sonne Cupid with his dart,
My vitall parts hath wounded,
Shoote home proud boy, and doe thy worst,
That shee may die that liues accurst.
Draw thy shaft vnto the head,
And strongly it deliuer,
Draw that thou mayst strike her dead,
That liues a hopelesse Louer,
Let come blind boy to satisfie,
His mind that most desire to dies.







VI. I cannot choose but give a smile

I cannot chuse but giue a smile,
To see how Loue doeth all beguile,
Except it bee my frozen heart,
That yeeldes not to his fierie Dart.
Belike I was Achillis like,
Drencht in that fatall hardning flood,
My flesh it feares no push of pike,
The speare against me doth no good.
Onely my heele may Cupid hit,
Aud yet I care not much for it,
Because the hurt I cannot feele,
Vnlesse my heart were in my heele.

The Answere.

I cannot chuse but needes must smile,
To see how Loue doth thee beguile,
Which did of purpose frieze thy heart,
To thaw it to thy greater smart.
Suppose thou wert Achillis like.
Drencht in that fatall hardning flood,
That might auaile gainst pusho pike, 20: But gainst his dart t'will doe no good.
For if thy heele he doe but hit,
His venom'd shaft will rancle it,
The force whereof the heart must feele,
Conuaide by Arteryes from thy heele.


The muses gardin for delights or fifth booke of ayers, 1610
by Robert Jones
(Dedicated to Lady Mary (Sidney) Wroth (1587?-1651?))
Part 3 - Ayres ?VII?. to VIII?.

- Go back to 'The Fifth Booke, Part 1 - Airs I to ?III'
Go back to 'The Fifth Booke, Part 2 - Ayres ?IV?. to VI?.
Go ahead to ' The Fifth Booke, Part 4 - Airs ?IX?. to X?. '
Go ahead to 'The Fifth Booke, Part 5 - Airs ?XI?. to XIII?. '
Go ahead to ' The Fifth Booke, Part 6? - Airs XIV to XXI '


Under Construction.
This is an unfinished page that I hope to edit sometime in the future.

Written & compiled by Patrick T. Connolly, ©
This page was revised, written & compiled on November 23 and 24, 2003.
Updated August 9, 2005 March 15 & 22, 2009.
First posted as Part 1 March 22, 2009 - this page is just thrown up quickly and may be divided into smaller Parts.
A bit of this has been up on Part ? - Ayres XIV. to XXI? (XIV. THERE WAS A WILY LAD) which has a reproduction of the originally published song.
This page was last updated August 2 - 5, 2010 - in celebration of the 400 year anniversary of this last booke - 1610 - 2010.




VII. Joy in thy hope, the earnest of thy Love

Ioye in thy hope, the earnest of thy Loue,
For so thou mayst Enioye thy hearts desire
True hopes, things absent doe as present prooue,
And keeepe aliue, Loues still renewing fire.
But of thy hope let silence be thy tongue,
And secresie the heart of louing fire,
For hopes reuealed may thy hopes prolong,
Or cut them off in prime-time of desire.
Sweete are those hopes that doe them selues enioy,
As vowed to them selues to liue and Dey,
Sweetest those ioyes and freest from annoy,
That waken not the eye of iealousie.

L'ENVOY.

Thy loue is not thy loue, if not thine owne,
And so it is not, if it once be knowne.

VII. Joy in thy hope, the earnest of thy Love - Notes, Recordings and Comments

This is a sonnet.



VIII. How many new years have grow'n old

How many new yeres haue grown old,
Since first your seruant old was new,
How many long howers haue I told,
Since first my loue was uow'd to you,
And yet alas, Shee doeth not know
Whether her seruant. loue or no.
How many wals as white as Snow,
And windowes cleere as any glasse,
Haue I coniur'd to tell you so,
Which faithfully performed was,
And yet you'l sweare you do not know,
Whether your seruant loue or no.
How often hath my pale leane face,
With true Characters of my loue,
Petitioned to you for grace,
Whom neither sighs nor teares can moue,
O cruell yet doe you not know,
Whether your seruant loue or no?
And wanting oft a better token,
I haue beene faine to send my heart,
Which now your cold disdaine hath broken,
Nor can you healt by any art,
O looke vpon't and you shall know,
Whether your seruant loue or no.



The muses gardin for delights or fifth booke of ayers, 1610
by Robert Jones
(Dedicated to Lady Mary (Sidney) Wroth (1587?-1651?))
Part 4 - Ayres ?IX?. to X?.
- Go back to 'The Fifth Booke, Part 1 - Airs I to ?III'
Go back ' The Fifth Booke, Part 3 - Airs ?VII?. to VIII?. '
Go ahead to 'The Fifth Booke, Part 5 - Airs ?XI?. to XIII?. '
Go ahead to ' The Fifth Booke, Part ? - Airs XIV to XXI '


Under Construction.
This is an unfinished page that I hope to edit sometime in the future.

Written & compiled by Patrick T. Connolly, ©
This page was revised, written & compiled on November 23 and 24, 2003.
Updated August 9, 2005 March 15 & 22, 2009.
First posted as Part 1 March 22, 2009 - this page is just thrown up quickly and may be divided into smaller Parts.
A bit of this has been up on Part ? - Ayres XIV. to XXI? (XIV. THERE WAS A WILY LAD) which has a reproduction of the originally published song.
This page was last updated August 2 - 5, 2010 - in celebration of the 400 year anniversary of this last booke - 1610 - 2010.




IX. There is a shepherd that did live

There was a Shepheard that did liue,
And helde his thoughtes as hie
As were the Mounts, whereon his flockes
did hourely feede him by.
He from his youth, his tender youth,
Which was vnapt to keepe,
Or hopes, or feares, or loues, or cares,
Or thoughts but of his sheepe
Did with his dogge as Shepheards doe,
For Shepheards wanting wit,
Deuise some sports, though foolish sports,
Yet sports for Shepheards fit,
The boy that (yet) was but a boy,
And so desir's were hid,
Did grow a man, and men must loue,
And loue this Shepheard aid.
He loued much, none can too much
Loue one so high diuiue? 19: As but her selfe, none but her selfe,
So faire, so fresh, so fine,
He vowed by his Shepheards weede,
An Oath which Shepheards keepe,
That he would follow Phillyday,
Before a flocke of sheepe.

IX. There is a shepherd that did live - Notes, Recordings and Comments


X. The sea hath many thousand sands

The Sea hath many thousand sands,
The Sunne hath motes as many,
The skie is full of starres
And loue as full of woes as an-ny,
Beleeue me that doe knowe the elfe,
And make no Tryall by thy selfe.

It is in trueth a prettie toye,
For babes to play withall,
But O the honies of our youth,
Are oft our ages gall
,
Selfe proofe in time will make thee know,
He was a Prophet told thee so.

A Prophet that Cassandra like,
Tels trueth without beliefe,
For head-strong youth will runne his race,
Although his Goale be griefe,
Loues Martyr when his heate is past,
Prooues cares Confessor at the last
.

X. The sea hath many thousand sands - Notes, Recordings and Comments

I guess a new musical settings was fitted to these words by a Robert Still (1910-1971);
http://www.recmusic.org/lieder/get_text.html?TextId=21741

Notes from Edward Doughtie's 'Lyrics From Elizabethan Airs , 1596-1622 ';
1. Sea ... sands. Tilley S91.
2. Sunne ... motes. Tilley M1192.
10 - 11. honies ... gall. Cf. Tilley Y40, "A reckless youth makes a gousty age" Cf. 17 - 18 also.



The muses gardin for delights or fifth booke of ayers, 1610
by Robert Jones
(Dedicated to Lady Mary (Sidney) Wroth (1587?-1651?))



This is the 400 year anniversary of Robert Jones's 5th (& last) booke ["The muses gardin for delights or fifth booke of ayers, 1610], and this is one of the 21 songs of the book. In celebration I have recorded this song in this anniversary year - mostly.


Source ; A site created by Harald Lillmeyer. Mr. Lillmeyer typed the text from a facsimile on the 1610 booke and preserved the original spelling.
This site can be found at; http://kulturserver-bayern.de/home/harald-lillmeyer/Texte/Downloads/Downloads.html


A site called "Heigh! Nonny Nonny! Welcome to British Song!" at: http://www.public.asu.edu/~icwwh/#SEC4 - gives this information;

My Love Hath Her True Love Betrayed. Why, Četis a fault that is too common ( [Fifth Booke 1610 #16]) Allegretto - G - 4 / 4 Anonymous Tenor or baritone / G3 - F4 Piano Stainer / English Lute Songs 2 ( ed. Pilkington ) ? Pg. 66 of collection.


Source ; A site created by Harald Lillmeyer. Mr. Lillmeyer typed the text from a facsimile on the 1610 booke and preserved the original spelling.
This site can be found at; http://kulturserver-bayern.de/home/harald-lillmeyer/Texte/Downloads/Downloads.html


- Go back to 'The Fifth Booke, Part 1 - Airs I to ?III'
Go back to ' The Fifth Booke, Part 3 - Airs ?VII?. to VIII?. '
Go back to ' The Fifth Booke, Part 4 - Airs ?IX?. to X?. '
Go ahead to 'The Fifth Booke, Part 5 - Airs ?XI?. to XIII?. '
Go ahead to ' The Fifth Booke, Part ? - Airs XIV to XXI '

Return to ' The First Booke 1600, Part 1 - Airs I to III'.
Return to ' The Second Booke 1601, Part 1 - Airs I to II'.
Return to 'The Third Booke 1605, Part 1 - Airs I to IV'.
Return to 'The Fourth Booke of Ayres 1609 , Part 1 - Airs I to II'.

Get into 'The life of Robert Jones'
Find the Life of Philip Rosseter


Written & compiled by Patrick T. Connolly, ©
This page was revised, written & compiled on November 23 and 24, 2003.
Updated August 9, 2005 March 15 & 22, 2009.
First posted as Part 1 March 22, 2009 and now divided into Part 2 - this page is just thrown up quickly and may be divided into smaller Parts. This page was last updated August 2 - 5, 2010 - in celebration of the 400 year anniversary of this last booke - 1610 - 2010. Last updated October 24, 2010.