Go back to 'The Complete Works Of Robert Jones'.
Return to ' this Philip Rosseter and Robert Jones web site's primary page '.
Go back to ' The Phreap Site '.

Return to ' The First Booke 1600, Part 1 - Airs I to III'.
Return to 'The Second Booke of Songs and Ayres 1601, Part 1 - Airs I to ?
Return to 'The Third Booke 1605, Part 1 - Airs I to IV'.
Go to Jones' only madrigal book 'The First Set of Madrigals' 1607.
Advance to 'The fifth booke of ayers, 1610' - the 1st half of the book which was firstly posted in March 1, 2009,

Get into 'The life of Robert Jones'. Find the Life of Philip Rosseter

Go to ' The Complete Works Of Philip Rosseter - Part 3a. - Works of Philip Rosseter found only in Manuscripts' &
Part 3b. - Philip Rosseter; The Arranger of Thomas Campion's Songs

A page about Thomas Morley.'s 'Triumphs Of Oriana'. My page on the Works of Richard Allison.

To Francis Pilkington's Life , Pilkington's Works or Pilkington's Lyrics


- In cerebration of the 400 year anniversary of publication -
A Musical Dreame or the Fourth Booke of Ayres 1609

Composed by Robert Jones [21 pieces]

A musicall dreame. or the fourth booke of ayres the first art is for lute two voyces, and the viole de gambo; the second part is for the lute, the viole and foure voices to sing; the third part is for one voyce alone, or to the lute, the basse viole, or to both if you please, whereof, two are Italian ayres ...
Imprinted by the assignes of William Barley, and are to be solde in Powles Church-yeard, at the signe of the crowne. 1609. - Robert Iones
Part 1 - Title, Dedication & To the Reader, Airs I to II.

Under Construction.
This is an unfinished page that I hope to edit sometime in the future.

Written & compiled by Patrick T. Connolly,
This page was written, compiled & revised on May 9, 2004 & April 15, 2009.
Updated - November 14 & 21 & 22, & December 6 (this 1st update posted), 2009.
First posted as Part 1 April 15, 2009 - this page was just thrown up quickly and now is divided into a smaller Part.
This is the 400 year anniversary of this booke and I hope to get a little bit of work done on these pages and playing some of its music in cerebration.



- In cerebration of the 400 year anniversary of publication -
A Musical Dreame or the Fourth Booke of Ayres 1609

Composed by Robert Jones [21 pieces]




Part 5 - Airs XVIII to XXI.

Return to 'Part 1 - Title, Dedication & To the Reader, Airs I to II. [+Part 2 & 3 Airs III to XI]
Return to [still on this page 1 Part 1]'Part 2 - Airs III to VII.
Return to [still on this page 1 Part 1]'Part 3 - Airs VIII to XI.
Return to 'Part 4 - Airs XII to XVII.'



XVIII. FAINE WOULD I SPEAK

1
Faine would I speake but feare to giue offence,
Makes mee retires and in amasement stand,
Still breathing forth, my woes in fruitlesse silence,
Whilst my poore hart is slaine by her faire hands :
Faire hands indeed the guiders of the dart
That from her eyes were leueld at my heart.
2
Those eyes two pointed Diamonds did engraue,
Within my heart the true and liuely forme,
Of that sweet Saint whose pitty most I craue,
Whose absence makes me comfortlesse to mourne,
And sighing say (Sweet) would she know my loue,
My plaints perhaps her mind may somewhat moue.
3
But if she knew, what if she did reiect,
Yet better twere by her sweet doome to die, [see Rosseter]
That she might know my deare loue true effect,
Then thus to liue in vnknowne misery,
Yet after death it may be she would say,
His too much loue did worke his liues decay.

www.harald-lillmeyer.kulturserver.de
Source ; A site created by Harald Lillmeyer. Mr. Lillmeyer typed the text from a facsimile on the 1609 booke and preserved the original spelling.
This site can be found at; http://kulturserver-bayern.de/home/harald-lillmeyer/Texte/Downloads/Downloads.html

XVIII. Fain Would I speek - Notes, Recordings and Comments

So I guess (to me at one time) the text in bold looked similar to words of a ditty in Rosseter's Booke [but I can not find it at this time - latter] see Rosseter

There are no notes about this song in Edward Doughtie's 'Lyrics From Elizabethan Airs , 1596-1622' or in Edmond Fellowes' 'English Madrigal Verse'



XIX. IN SHERWOOD LIVED STOUT ROBIN HOOD
Music by Robert Jones - Words could be by William Shakespeare

In Sherwood lived stout Robin Hood
An Archer great none greater.
His bow & shafts were sure & good,
Yet Cupid's were much better.
Robin could shoot at many a Heart and miss,
Cupid at first could hit a heart of his,

Hey jolly Robin.
Hoe jolly Robin, Hey jolly Robin Hood.
Love finds out me As well as thee
To follow me, To the green wood.

A noble thief was Robin Hood,
Wise was he could deceive him,
Yet Marrian in his bravest mood,
Could of his heart bereave him,
No greater thief lies hidden under skies.
Then beauty closely lodged in women's eyes.

Hey jolly Robin. ...

An Out-law was this Robin Hood,
His life free and unruly,
Yet to fair Marrian bound he stood
And loves debt paid her duely.
Whom curb of stricktest law could not hold in,
Love with obedience and a wink could win.

Hey jolly Robin. ...

Now wend we home stout Robin Hood,
Leave we the woods behind us,
Love passions must not be withstood,
Love everywhere will find us,
I livd in field and town, and so did he,
I got me to the woods, love followed me.

Hey Jolly Robin.

XIX. In Sherwood lived stout Robin Hood - Notes, Recordings and Comments

Notes from Edward Doughtie's 'Lyrics From Elizabethan Airs , 1596-1622' page 579;
This song is listed in the table of New York Public Library, Drexel MS 4175 (fol. 26) but missing from the MS

Othello madness Robin Hood - Hamlet (1600?) Ophelia drowns

This is the only song in this Booke that I have been playing over the years. In my own modest musical endeavors I have been struggling with songs from Robert Jones's 1st, 5th and 2nd Bookes and about the only song from this Musical Dreame that I have been trying to play since 1980s is this 'In Sherwood lived stout Robin Hood'. I started my own recording of this song in August 2009 in cerebration of the 400 year anniversary of its publication.

A recording of this song is on the CD 'Shakespeare's England' by James Griffett (2002), on Griffin.
It is on track #11 which is a "Robin Hood sequence" of 4 songs about Robin Hood; two of which have a solid connection to Shakespeare.

Publishing History

This poem is printed in a children's book with Robert Jones given credit as author.

From a site called 'Heigh! Nonny Nonny! - Welcome to British Song!'
"Jones, Robert ( fl.1600 - 1610 [fl.1597 - 1617]) In Sherwood Lived Stout Robin Hood, an archer great, none greater ( 1609 [Forth Booke 1609 #19]) Fast - G - 3 / 4 Anonymous High / D4 - G5 Piano Stainer / Fellowes 40 Elizabethan Songs I Pg. 16 of collection. 00:45. Also in Doubleday Anchor / Elizabethan Song Book; Oxford / English Ayres IV. Also available in Medium Eb ( Bb3 - Eb5 ) , Stainer / Fellowes 40 Eliabethan Songs I Low "

---------------------------------



XX. ITE CALDI SOSPIRI

Ite, caldi sospiri, al freddo core,
Rompete il ghiaccio che Piet contende,
E se prego mortale al ciel s'intende,
Morte O merc sia fine al mio dolore.

Francesco Petrarca
Il Canzoniere (Rerum Vulgarium Fragmenta) No 153

Source ; A site created by Harald Lillmeyer. Mr. Lillmeyer typed the text from a facsimile on the 1609 booke and preserved the original spelling.
This site can be found at; http://kulturserver-bayern.de/home/harald-lillmeyer/Texte/Downloads/Downloads.html

XX. Ite, caldi sospiri - Notes, Recordings and Comments

A recording of this song is on the CD 'A Musical Dreame' by Michael Chance, David Cordier, Erin Headley, Stephen Stubbs & Andrew Lawrence-King (Released 09/05/1990), on Tragicomedia & Hyperion #66335.

Another recording of this song is on the CD 'The Muses Gardin: Lute Songs by Robert Jones' by Emma Kirkbe and Anthony Rooley (1991), on Virgin Classics.

Publishing History

From a site called 'Heigh! Nonny Nonny! - Welcome to British Song!'
"Jones, Robert ( fl.1600 - 1610 [fl.1597 - 1617]) Ite Caldi Sospiri, al freddo core ( 1609 [Forth Booke 1609 #20]) Adagio - g - 2 / 2 Anonymous Baritone / D3 - D4 Piano Doubleday Anchor / Elizabethan Song Book Pg. 195 of collection. 1:40. "



XXI. S'AMOR NON E,

S'amor non , che dunque quel ch'io sento?
Ma s'egli amor, perdio, che cosa et quale?
Se bona, onde l'effecto aspro mortale?
Se ria, onde s dolce ogni tormento?

S'a mia voglia ardo, onde 'l pianto e lamento?
S'a mal mio grado, il lamentar che vale?
O viva morte, o dilectoso male,
come puoi tanto in me, s'io no 'l consento?

Francesco Petrarca
Il Canzoniere (Rerum Vulgarium Fragmenta) No 132

Online text copyright , Harald Lillmeyer www.harald-lillmeyer.kulturserver.de

XXI. S'amor non , che dunque quel ch'io sento? - Notes, Recordings and Comments

I do not know of any recordings of this song and I do not think it is available on CD, MD, LP, 45 or 78. ----------------------



Written & compiled by Patrick T. Connolly,
This page was written, compiled & revised on May 9, 2004 & April 15, 2009.
Updated - November 14 & 21 & 22, & December 6 (this 1st update posted), 2009.
First posted as Part 1 April 15, 2009 - this page was just thrown up quickly and now is divided into a smaller Part.
This is the 400 year anniversary of this booke and I hope to get a little bit of work done on these pages and playing some of its music in cerebration.

Page Bibliography

Edward Doughtie's 'Lyrics From Elizabethan Airs , 1596-1622' Cambridge, Mass. Harvard University Press, 1970.

Music & Letters 1927
The Text of the song Books of Robert Jones
by E. H. Fellowes

The English School of Lutenist Song-Writers Series 2, volume 6. Ultimun vale third booke of ayres (1608) [1605].. Stainer & Bell (1926).

A site created by Harald Lillmeyer that can be found at; http://kulturserver-bayern.de/home/harald-lillmeyer
Look under 'Downloads'.

Heigh! Nonny Nonny! - Welcome to British Song!

http://www.public.asu.edu/~icwwh/#SEC4
http://cfa.asu.edu:591/FMPro?



Part 5 - Airs XVIII to XXI.

Return to 'Part 1 - Title, Dedication & To the Reader, Airs I to II. [+Part 2 & 3 Airs III to XI]
Return to [still on this page 1 Part 1]'Part 2 - Airs III to VII.
Return to [still on this page 1 Part 1]'Part 3 - Airs VIII to XI.
Return to 'Part 4 - Airs XII to XVII.'