A musicall dreame. or the fourth booke of ayres the first art is for lute two voyces, and the viole de gambo; the second part is for the lute, the viole and foure voices to sing; the third part is for one voyce alone, or to the lute, the basse viole, or to both if you please, whereof, two are Italian ayres ...
Imprinted by the assignes of William Barley, and are to be solde in Powles Church-yeard, at the signe of the crowne. 1609. - Robert Iones
Go back to 'The Complete Works Of Robert Jones'.
Return to ' this Philip Rosseter and Robert Jones web site's primary page '.
Go back to ' The Phreap Site '.

Return to ' The First Booke 1600, Part 1 - Airs I to III'.
Return to 'The Second Booke of Songs and Ayres 1601, Part 1 - Airs I to ?
Return to 'The Third Booke 1605, Part 1 - Airs I to IV'.
Go to Jones' only madrigal book 'The First Set of Madrigals' 1607.
Advance to 'The fifth booke of ayers, 1610' - the 1st half of the book which was firstly posted in March 1, 2009,

Get into 'The life of Robert Jones' . Find the Life of Philip Rosseter

Go to ' The Complete Works Of Philip Rosseter - Part 3a. - Works of Philip Rosseter found only in Manuscripts' &
Part 3b. - Philip Rosseter; The Arranger of Thomas Campion's Songs

A page about Thomas Morley.'s 'Triumphs Of Oriana'. My page on the Works of Richard Allison.
To Francis Pilkington's Life , Pilkington's Works or Pilkington's Lyrics


- In cerebration of the 400 year anniversary of publication -
A Musical Dreame or the Fourth Booke of Ayres 1609

Composed by Robert Jones [21 pieces]

Part 4 - Airs XII to XVII.

Return to 'Part 1 - Title, Dedication & To the Reader, Airs I to II. [+Part 2 & 3 Airs III to XI]
Return to [still on this page 1 Part 1]'Part 2 - Airs III to VII.
Return to [still on this page 1 Part 1]'Part 3 - Airs VIII to XI.
Advance to 'Part 5 - Airs XVIII to XXI.



Under Construction.
This is an unfinished page that I hope to edit sometime in the future.

Written & compiled by Patrick T. Connolly,
This page was written, compiled & revised on May 9, 2004 & April 15, 2009.
Updated - November 14 & 22, & December 6 (this 1st update posted), 2009.
First posted as Part 1 April 15, 2009 - this page is just thrown up quickly and may be divided into smaller Parts.
This is the 400 year anniversary of this booke and I hope to get a little bit of work done on these pages and playing some of its music in cerebration.




XII. SHE HATH AN EYE

1
She hath an eye, ah me, ah me,
She hath an eye, ah me, to see,
Ah me that shee hath too
Which makes me sigh as louers doe, hey hoe, hey hoe
Hey hoe, ah me, that an eye
Should make her liue and mee to die.
Wise mens eyes are in their mind,
But louers eyes are euer blind.
2
She hath a lippe, ah, ah, alas,
Two lippes wich doe themselues surpasse,
Alasse two lips for kisses,
Of earthly loue that heauenly blisses, hey hoe, hey hoe
Alasse, oh woe that a heauen,
Should make vs ods that make all euen.
Ladies kisses are a charme,
That kill vs ere they doe vs harme.
3
She hath a heart, ah me, ah me,
A heart she hath which none can see,
Ah me that I haue none,
Which makes me sigh, yea sighing grone, hey hoe, hey hoe
Hey hoe, aye me, that I part,
And liue, yet leaue with her my heart.
Hartlesse men may hue by loue,
This she doth know and this I proue.

Source ; A site created by Harald Lillmeyer. Mr. Lillmeyer typed the text from a facsimile on the 1610 booke and preserved the original spelling.
This site can be found at; http://kulturserver-bayern.de/home/harald-lillmeyer/Texte/Downloads/Downloads.html

XII. She hath an eye - Notes, Recordings and Comments

You can download midi files of all these works from Harald Lillmeyer's site.
I do not know of any recordings of this song but this April (2009) I started to record my owne interpretation of this work.
This is the 400 year anniversary of this booke and I hope to record some of its music in cerebration. - P. T. C.

Notes from Edward Doughtie's 'Lyrics From Elizabethan Airs , 1596-1622'
XII. She Hath
8 louers eyes are euer blind. Cf. Tilley L605.
14 ods. I.e., at odds.

- - - - - -



XIII. I KNOW NOT WHAT

I know not what yet that I feele is much,
It came I know not when, it was not euer
Yet hurtes I know not how, yet is it such
As I am pleasd though it be cured neuer
It is a wound that wasteth still in woe
And yet I would not, that it were not so,
Pleasde with a thought that endeth with a sigh,
Sometimes I smile when teares stand in my eyes,
Yet then and there such sweet contentment lieth,
Both when and where my sweet sower torment lies,
O out alas, I cannot long endure it,
And yet alasse I care not when I cure it.
But well away, me thinks I am not shee,
That wonted was these fits as foule to scorne.
One and the same, euen so I seeme to be,
As lost I liue, yet of my selfe forlorne,
What may this be that thus my mind doth moue,
Alasse I feare, God shield it be not loue.

XIII. I know not what - Notes, Recordings and Comments

Notes from Edward Doughtie's 'Lyrics From Elizabethan Airs , 1596-1622'
XIII. I know not
Cf. Petrarch CXXXII (Sonnet102), the first lines of which arc set in No. XXI [S'amor non e] below; also cf. Fer1609.VIII [Young and simple though I am] (poem by Campion [The Fourth Book of Ayres (c.1618 ?]).
7-9 sigh ... lieth. This could be a legitimate rhyme; sigh was sometimes spelled sithe and transcribed by early writers on pronunciation with a thorn. See E. J. Dobson, English Ponunciation 1500-1700 (Oxford, 1957), I, 181-182.



XIV. GRIEF OF MY BEST LOVE'S ABSENTING

Griefe, griefe of my best loues absenting:
Now O now wilt thou assayle mee
I had rather life should fayle mee
Then endure thy slow tormenting,
Life our griefes and vs doe seuer
Once for euer
Absence griefe haue no relenting.

Well, be it foule absence spights me,
So fit of it cannot send her,
As my heart should not attend her.
O how this thoughts thought delights me
Absence doe thy worst and spare not,
Know I care not
When thou wrongst me, my thoughts right me.
O but such thoughts proue illusions,
Shadowes of a substance banisht,
Dreames of pleasure too soone vanisht,
Reasons maimde of their conclusions,
Then since thoughts and all deceiue me,
O life leaue me,
End of life ends loues confusions.

XIV. Grief of my best love's absenting - Notes, Recordings and Comments

Notes from Edward Doughtie's 'Lyrics From Elizabethan Airs , 1596-1622'
XIIII. Grief of my
5-7 life ... relenting. Cf. the sentiment in Ford1607.I.9-10. Perhaps here life should read death, and absence, griefe should be absence's griefes. (A reads griefes, incidentally.)

A recording of this song is on the CD 'A Musical Dreame' by Michael Chance, David Cordier, Erin Headley, Stephen Stubbs & Andrew Lawrence-King (Released 09/05/1990), on Tragicomedia & Hyperion #66335.



XV. IF IN THIS FLESH

If in this flesh where thou in drencht dost lie
Poore soule thou canst reare vp thy limed wings,
Carry my thoughts vp to the sacred skie
And wash them in those heauenly hallowed springs,
Where ioy and requeum The holy Angels sings
Whilst all heauens vault with blessed Ecchoes blessed Echoes rings.
Awaked with this harmony diuine,
O how my soule mounts vp her throned head,
And gines again with natiue glory shine,
Wash with repentance then thy dayes misled,
Then ioyes with requeum mayest thou with Angels sing,
Whilest all heauens vault with blessed Ecchoes ring.

XV. If in this flesh - Notes, Recordings and Comments

A recording of this song is on the CD 'The Muses Gardin: Lute Songs by Robert Jones' by Emma Kirkbe and Anthony Rooley (1991), on Virgin Classics. Rooley treats this song, together with the next two, as a trilogy.

In his liner notes, to this CD, Anthony Rooley defends Jones from modern critics saying "Jones' best melancholy ayres are deeply influenced by the acknowledged master of melancholy [John Dowland] and, at their best, may be compared favorably to all but three of four greatest of Dowland's melancholy masterpieces. Dowland's 'Flow My Tears', Stay Sorrow', or 'Come Heavy Sleep', are individual creations of genius beyond comparison; but listen to Jones'Lie downe poore heart' [from Jones's first book (1600) VI] ,' 'Flye from the world', [from Jones's third book (1605) XIV] or 'If in this flesh' [from Jones's fourth book, (1609) XV] ,' I am sure the unbiased ear will find inspired melancholy of the richest kind. ...."

Another recording of this song is on the CD; The Lady Musick by The Consort of Musicke - Anthony Rooley, dir. (lute) Emma Kirkby (soprano), Anthony Rooley
Recording date - unknown [1979 or prior] L'Oiseau-Lyre "Florilegium" DSLO 559-1 [LP]
For more on this CD go to Early Music FAQ at - http://www.medieval.org/emfaq/cds/lol559.htm

Notes from Edward Doughtie's 'Lyrics From Elizabethan Airs , 1596-1622'
XV. If in this flesh
"2 soule ... limed wing. Cf. Hamlet, III.iii. 68-69."


On the CD 'The Muses Gardin: Lute Songs by Robert Jones', by Emma Kirkbe and Anthony Rooley, these three songs were presented in the book's original order;
'XV. If in this flesh', 'XVI. 0 thread of life' and 'XVII. When I sit reading'. A fourth song 'XX. Ite, caldi sospiri' is also on the CD. This CD has been repackaged with a John Dowland CD on Vergin 'Veritas' and this is a photo of the inside of the new CD.
XVI. O THREAD OF LIFE

O thred of life when thou art spt how are my sorrowes eased.
O vaile of flesh when thou art rent how shal my soule be pleased:
O earth why tremblest thou at death
That did receiue both heate and breath
By bargain of a second birth,
That done again to be cold earth,
Come death deere widwife to my life,
See sin and vertue holde at strife,
Make hast a way
Lest thy delay
Bee my decay
World of inanity
School house of vanity
Minion of hell
Farewell farewell.
O coward life whose feare doth tie me in distasting sences,
Infused part mount vp on hie, life gets on life offences,
O she immortall flie away,
Be not immurde in finite clay,
Where true loue doth with selfe loue fight,
Begetting thoughts that doe affright,
Courage faint heart, sound trumpet death,
Ile find it wind with all my breath.
O case of glasse,
Confusions mase,
A flouring grasse,
Temple of treachery,
Soule yoake to misery,
Store-house of hell
Farewell, farewell.

XVI. O thread of life - Notes, Recordings and Comments

A recording of this song is on the CD 'The Muses Gardin: Lute Songs by Robert Jones' by Emma Kirkbe and Anthony Rooley (1991), on Virgin Classics.

Notes from Edward Doughtie's 'Lyrics From Elizabethan Airs , 1596-1622' page 578
XVI. O thread of life
17 Infused part. I.e., the soul, which is infused in the body.
25 mase. EMV, p. 595, reads mass, as the rhyme demands; but maze is a remote possibility.
26 grasse. Cf. Tilley F359, "All flesh is grass."



XVII. WHEN I SIT READING

1
When I sit reading all alone that secret booke
Wherein I sigh to looke
How many spots there bee,
I wish I could not see,
Or from my selfe might flee.
2
Mine eyes for refuge then with zeale befixe the skies,
My teares doe cloude those eyes,
My sighes doe blow them drie,
And yet I liue to die,
My selfe I cannot flie.
3
Heauens I implore, that knowes my fault, what shall I doe,
To hell I dare not goe,
The world first made me rue,
My selfe my griefes renew,
To whome then shall I sue.
4
Alasse, my soule doth faint to draw this doubtfull breath,
Is there no hope in death,
O yes, death ends my woes :
Death me from me will lose,
My selfe am all my foes.

Source ; A site created by Harald Lillmeyer. Mr. Lillmeyer typed the text from a facsimile on the 1609 booke and preserved the original spelling.
This site can be found at; http://kulturserver-bayern.de/home/harald-lillmeyer/Texte/Downloads/Downloads.html

XVII. When I sit reading all alone - Notes, Recordings and Comments

A recording of this song is on the CD 'The Muses Gardin: Lute Songs by Robert Jones' by Emma Kirkbe and Anthony Rooley (1991), on Virgin Classics.

Notes from Edward Doughtie's 'Lyrics From Elizabethan Airs , 1596-1622' page 578 & 579
XVII. When I sit reading
This poem is included in a MS entitled "The Workes of the Lady Ann Sothwell:
Decemb: 2o 1626" (Folger MS V.b.198), where it appears on fol. 1 as " Sonnett 2a."
The poem is not necessarily by Lady Southwell: see the note to Ferrobosco1609.XVI [Fly from the world]. Variants are as follows:
3 spots] blotts
6-12 omitted
13 knowes my fault] showes my Guilt what ... doe] omitted
16 griefes] woes
18-19 omitted
21 O .. , woes] Yes: Death ends all our woes





Written & compiled by Patrick T. Connolly,
This page was written, compiled & revised on May 9, 2004 & April 15, 2009.
Updated - November 14 & 22, & December 6 (this 1st update posted), 2009.
.
First posted as Part 1 April 15, 2009 - this page is just thrown up quickly and may be divided into smaller Parts.
This is the 400 year anniversary of this booke and I hope to get a little bit of work done on these pages and playing some of its music in cerebration.

Page Bibliography

Edward Doughtie's 'Lyrics From Elizabethan Airs , 1596-1622' Cambridge, Mass. Harvard University Press, 1970.

Music & Letters 1927
The Text of the song Books of Robert Jones
by E. H. Fellowes

The English School of Lutenist Song-Writers Series 2, volume 6. Ultimun vale third booke of ayres (1608) [1605].. Stainer & Bell (1926).

A site created by Harald Lillmeyer that can be found at; http://kulturserver-bayern.de/home/harald-lillmeyer
Look under 'Downloads'.

Heigh! Nonny Nonny! - Welcome to British Song!

http://www.public.asu.edu/~icwwh/#SEC4
http://cfa.asu.edu:591/FMPro?



Part 4 - Airs XII to XVII.

Return to 'Part 1 - Title, Dedication & To the Reader, Airs I to II. [+Part 2 & 3 Airs III to XI]
Return to [still on this page 1 Part 1]'Part 2 - Airs III to VII.
Return to [still on this page 1 Part 1]'Part 3 - Airs VIII to XI.
Advance to 'Part 5 - Airs XVIII to XXI.