Go back to 'The Complete Works Of Robert Jones'.
Return to ' this Philip Rosseter and Robert Jones web site's primary page '.
Go back to ' The Phreap Site '.

Return to ' The First Booke 1600, Part 1 - Airs I to III'.
Return to 'The Second Booke of Songs and Ayres 1601, Part 1 - Airs I to ?
Return to 'The Third Booke 1605, Part 1 - Airs I to IV'.
Go to Jones' only madrigal book 'The First Set of Madrigals' 1607.
Advance to 'The fifth booke of ayers, 1610' - the 1st half of the book which was firstly posted in March 1, 2009,

Get into 'The life of Robert Jones'. Find the Life of Philip Rosseter

Go to ' The Complete Works Of Philip Rosseter - Part 3a. - Works of Philip Rosseter found only in Manuscripts' &
Part 3b. - Philip Rosseter; The Arranger of Thomas Campion's Songs

A page about Thomas Morley.'s 'Triumphs Of Oriana'. My page on the Works of Richard Allison.
To Francis Pilkington's Life , Pilkington's Works or Pilkington's Lyrics


- In cerebration of the 400 year anniversary of publication -
A Musical Dreame or the Fourth Booke of Ayres 1609

Composed by Robert Jones [21 pieces]

A musicall dreame. or the fourth booke of ayres the first art is for lute two voyces, and the viole de gambo; the second part is for the lute, the viole and foure voices to sing; the third part is for one voyce alone, or to the lute, the basse viole, or to both if you please, whereof, two are Italian ayres ...

Imprinted by the assignes of William Barley, and are to be solde in Powles Church-yeard, at the signe of the crowne. 1609.

Robert Iones


Part 1 - Title, Dedication & To the Reader, Airs I to II [+Part 2 & 3 Airs III to XI].

Advance to [still on this page so scroll down]'Part 2 - Airs III to VII.'
Advance to [still on this page so scroll down]'Part 3 - Airs VIII to XI.
Advance to 'Part 4 - Airs XII to XVII.'
Advance to 'Part 5 - Airs XVIII to XXI.



Under Construction.
This is an unfinished page that I hope to edit sometime in the future.

Written & compiled by Patrick T. Connolly,
This page was written, compiled & revised on May 9, 2004 & April 15, 2009.
Updated - November 14, 21 & 22 & 23, & December 6 (this 1st update posted), 2009.
First posted as Part 1 April 15, 2009 - this page is just thrown up quickly and may be divided into smaller Parts.
This is the 400 year anniversary of this booke and I hope to get a little bit of work done on these pages and playing some of its music in cerebration.



TO THE RIGHT WORSHIPFVLL AND WORTHY Gentleman, Sir Iohn Levinthorpe Knight
perpetuall Happinesse and content.

It is not unknown to your well deserving self, ...

Robert Iones.


To All Musicall Murmures,
This greeting.

Thou, whose eare itches with the varietie of opinion, ... I have stood at thine elbow, and heard thee propfane even Musickes best note ...
if all this paines reape not good commendations, and it is water wrung out of a Flint in thee, sin?th thou never think it well of any, and wert in thy selfe so unskilfull ever, as thy Tutor from the first bowre could never make thee sing in Tune; ...

... hold yourself from further carping.




E. H. Fellowes writes in "The Text of the Song Books of Robert Jones" (Music & Letters 1927) that "A Musical Dreame"is easily the most carelessly produced book in the whole series, ..."


Publishing History



A Musicall dreame or the Fourth Booke of Ayres, Recording History

Since the CD 'A Musical Dreame' by Michael Chance, David Cordier, Erin Headley, Stephen Stubbs & Andrew Lawrence-King covered a half the songs of this booke, and the CD 'The Muses Gardin: Lute Songs by Robert Jones' by Emma Kirkbe and Anthony Rooley (1991) covered another 3, more songs from this Booke have been recorded and released on CDs, LPs & 78s than any other Books of Robert Jones's.

A recording of this song is on the CD 'A Musical Dreame' by Michael Chance, David Cordier, Erin Headley, Stephen Stubbs & Andrew Lawrence-King (Released 09/05/1990), on Tragicomedia & Hyperion #66335.

I. Though Your Strangeness Frets My Heart (Campian)
II. Sweet Kate
III. Once Did I Serve a Cruel Heart
IV. Will Said to His Mammy
V. Hark! Wot Ye What?
VI. My Complaining Is But Feigning
VII. On a Time in Summer Season
VIII. Farewell, Fond Youth
XIV. Grief of My Best Love's Absenting
XI. And Is It Night?
XX. Ite caldi sospiri (Petrarch) (Another recording of this song is on the CD 'The Muses Gardin: Lute Songs by Robert Jones' by Kirkbe and Rooley (1991))

Recordings of these three song are on the CD 'The Muses Gardin: Lute Songs by Robert Jones' by Emma Kirkbe and Anthony Rooley (1991), on Virgin Classics. Rooley treats these song together as a trilogy;

XV. If in this flesh
XVI. O thread of life
XVII. When I sit reading

A recording of this song is on the CD 'Shakespeare's England' by James Griffett (2002), on Griffin;

XIX. In Sherwood lived stout Robin Hood

Thus leaving these six songs unrecorded - as I do not know of any recordings of these song. I do not think they are available on CD, MD, LP, 45 or 78;

IX. How should I show my love?
X. 0 he is gone
XII. She hath an eye
XIII. I know not what (Cf. Petrarch CXXXII (Sonnet102), the first lines of which arc set in No. XXI [S'amor non e])
XVIII. Fain Would I speek
XXI. S'amor non e

A Musical Dreame

Hyperion #66335 , Released 09/05/90
Composers; 11 Songs from A Musical Dreame or the Fourth Booke of Ayres 1609 by Robert Jones, 2 songs by John Dowland, 4 songs by Giles Farnaby, 3 songs by Tobias Hume, 1 madrigal by John Cooper (Coperario) and 1 song by Angelo Notari.
Performers Michael Chance (COUNTER TENOR) David Cordier (COUNTER TENOR) Erin Headley (BASS VIOLA DA GAMBA) Stephen Stubbs (LUTE) Andrew Lawrence-King (HARP)
Conductor Stephen Stubbs / Tragicomedia
http://www.allmusic.com/cg/amg.dll?p=amg&sql=43:92447





I. THOUGH YOUR STRANGENESS FRETS MY HEART

1
Though your strangenes frets my heart,
Yet must I not complaine,
You perswade me tis but Art,
Which secret loue must faine,
If another you affect,
Tis but a toy to auoide suspect,
Is this faire excusing,
O no, all is abusing.
2
When you wisht sight I desire,
Suspition you pretend,
Causlesse you your selfe retire,
Whilst I in vaine attend,
Thus a louer as you say,
Still made more eager by delay,
Is this faire excusing,
O no, all is abusing.
3
When another holds your hand,
Youle sweare I hold your heart,
Whilst my riuall close doth stand,
And I sit farre apart,
I am neerer yet then they,
Hid in your bosome as you say,
Is this faire excusing,
O no, all is abusing.
4
Would a riuall then I were,
Some else your secret friend,
So much lesser should I feare,
And not so much attend,
Then enioy you euery one,
Yet must I seeme your friend alone,
Is this faire excusing,
O no, all is abusing.

Source ; A site created by Harald Lillmeyer. Mr. Lillmeyer typed the text from a facsimile on the 1609 booke and preserved the original spelling.
This site can be found at; http://kulturserver-bayern.de/home/harald-lillmeyer/Texte/Downloads/Downloads.html

I. Though your strangeness - Notes, Recordings and Comments

Read my essay; "Robert Jones' Association with Thomas Campion".

Notes from Edward Doughtie's 'Lyrics From Elizabethan Airs , 1596-1622'

"Campion ... his Second Booke of Ayres (c.1613) ... ...
Other copies may be found in (D) New York Public Library, Drexel MS 4175 (c. 1620 or later) with Jones's melody (Cantus Primus) and bass; (E) Forbes' Cantus (1662) sig. N1v - N2 ("The Thirtyone Song"), with Jones's melody ; (F) Christ Church, Oxford MS.439 (c. 1620), p26 with Campion's melody and bass (...) ; (G) Yale School of Music .. Campion's music ... (H) Egerton ... (no music); (I) BM MS 33933 (... Campion's music ... ); (J) ... Campion's music ... by Dr. John Wilson ... Wilson's version in (K) ... Campion's music are in (L) ... "
- pages 573, 574 & 575;

A recording of this song is on the CD 'A Musical Dreame' by Michael Chance, David Cordier, Erin Headley, Stephen Stubbs & Andrew Lawrence-King (Released 09/05/1990), on Tragicomedia & Hyperion #66335.

You can download midi files of all these works from Harald Lillmeyer's site.



II. SWEET KATE, OF LATE RAN AWAY

1
Sweete Kate,
Of late,
Ran away and left me playning,
A bide,
I cride,
Or I die with thy disdayning,
Te hee hee quoth she,
Gladly would I see,
Any man to die with louing,
Neuer any yet,
Died of such a fitte,
Neither haue I feare of prouing.
2
Vnkind,
I find,
Thy delight is in tormenting,
A bide,
I cride,
Or I die with thy consenting,
Te hee hee quoth she,
Make no foole of me,
Men I know haue oathes at pleasure,
But their hopes attaind,
They bewray they faind,
And their oathes are kept at leasure.
3
Her words,
Like swords,
Cut my sorry heart in sunder,
Her floutes,
With doubts,
Kept my heart affections vnde,
Te hee hee quoth she,
What a foole is he,
Stands in awe of once denying,
Cause I had in ough
To become more rough,
So I did, O happy trying.

Source ; A site created by Harald Lillmeyer. Mr. Lillmeyer typed the text from a facsimile on the 1609 booke and preserved the original spelling.
This site can be found at; http://kulturserver-bayern.de/home/harald-lillmeyer/Texte/Downloads/Downloads.html

II. Sweet Kate - Notes, Recordings and Comments

There is and old recording of this on an LP by maybe Alfred Deller? I think I have a newer recording on a CD somewhere. - I will find it someday.

Folksongs 13th & 17th Century [I have it] Musique D'Abord #190226 , Released 02/01/88 Composer(s) Robert Jones [- Sweet Kate of late. [4th book] ] Traditional
Performers Alfred Deller & The Deller Consort (COUNTER TENOR) Desmond Dupre (GUITAR) Desmond Dupre (LUTE) Mark Deller (COUNTER TENOR)

Another recording of this song is on the CD 'A Musical Dreame' by Michael Chance, David Cordier, Erin Headley, Stephen Stubbs & Andrew Lawrence-King (Released 09/05/1990), on Tragicomedia & Hyperion #66335.

Notes from Edward Doughtie's 'Lyrics From Elizabethan Airs , 1596-1622' ;
"Jones's Cantus Primus was reprinted in Forbes' Cantus (1662) sig. O1v - O1v, with the following variants ..."
- page 575;

Publishing History

From a site called 'Heigh! Nonny Nonny! - Welcome to British Song!'
"Duet: Sweet Kate, of late ran away and left me plaining ( 1609 [Forth Booke 1609 #2]) Fast - g - 2 / 2 Anonymous Tenor and baritone / F3 - F4, C3 - D4 Piano Oxford / English Ayres IV Humorous. Also in Doubleday Anchor / Elizabethan Song Book. In solo version, in Baritone e ( D3 - D4 ), Boosey / Elizabethan Love - Songs, Set 1 Low ( arr. Keel ). Jones, Robert ( fl.1600 - 1610 [fl.1597 - 1617])"







Go back to 'The Complete Works Of Robert Jones'.
Return to ' this Philip Rosseter and Robert Jones web site's primary page '.
Go back to ' The Phreap Site '.

Return to ' The First Booke 1600, Part 1 - Airs I to III'.
Return to 'The Second Booke of Songs and Ayres 1601, Part 1 - Airs I to ?
Return to 'The Third Booke 1605, Part 1 - Airs I to IV'.
Go to Jones' only madrigal book 'The First Set of Madrigals' 1607.
Advance to 'The fifth booke of ayers, 1610' - the 1st half of the book which was firstly posted in March 1, 2009,

Get into 'The life of Robert Jones'. Find the Life of Philip Rosseter

Go to ' The Complete Works Of Philip Rosseter - Part 3a. - Works of Philip Rosseter found only in Manuscripts' &
Part 3b. - Philip Rosseter; The Arranger of Thomas Campion's Songs

A page about Thomas Morley.'s 'Triumphs Of Oriana'. My page on the Works of Richard Allison.

To Francis Pilkington's Life , Pilkington's Works or Pilkington's Lyrics


- In cerebration of the 400 year anniversary of publication -
A Musical Dreame or the Fourth Booke of Ayres 1609

Composed by Robert Jones [21 pieces]


Part 2 - Airs III to VII.

Under Construction.
This is an unfinished page that I hope to edit sometime in the future.

Written & compiled by Patrick T. Connolly,
This page was written, compiled & revised on May 9, 2004 & April 15, 2009.
Updated - November 14 & 22, 2009.
First posted as Part 1 April 15, 2009 - this page is just thrown up quickly and may be divided into smaller Parts.
This is the 400 year anniversary of this booke and I hope to get a little bit of work done on these pages and playing some of its music in cerebration.




A Musical Dreame A musicall dreame. or the fourth booke of ayres the first art is for lute two voyces, and the viole de gambo; the second part is for the lute, the viole and foure voices to sing; the third part is for one voyce alone, or to the lute, the basse viole, or to both if you please, whereof, two are Italian ayres ...

Imprinted by the assignes of William Barley, and are to be solde in Powles Church-yeard, at the signe of the crowne. 1609.

Robert Iones





III. ONCE DID I SERVE A CRUEL HEART

Once did I serue a cruell heart,
With faith vnfainde I still importune,
Her piersing lookes that wrought my smart,
She laughes and smiles at my misfortune,
And sayes perhaps you may at last,
By true desert loues fauour taste.

Source ; A site created by Harald Lillmeyer. Mr. Lillmeyer typed the text from a facsimile on the 1609 booke and preserved the original spelling.
This site can be found at; http://kulturserver-bayern.de/home/harald-lillmeyer/Texte/Downloads/Downloads.html

III. Once did I serve a cruel heart - Notes, Recordings and Comments

You can download midi files of all these works from Harald Lillmeyer's site.

I did not know of any recordings of this duet and this April (2009) I started to record my owne interpretation of this work. I just learned this November of the contense of the CD 'A Musical Dreame' and you will find a much more professional recording there of this song than what you are hearing here.
This is the 400 year anniversary of this booke and I am glad to have to record some of its music in cerebration. - P. T. C. 2009.

A recording of this song is on the CD 'A Musical Dreame' by Michael Chance, David Cordier, Erin Headley, Stephen Stubbs & Andrew Lawrence-King (Released 09/05/1990), on Tragicomedia & Hyperion #66335.

There are no notes about this song in Edward Doughtie's 'Lyrics From Elizabethan Airs , 1596-1622'.
Edmond Fellowes' in 'English Madrigal Verse' writes;
"3 piercing] smiling A."

- - - - - - - - - - -

My song here embeded from my SoundClick ("Once did I serve a cruel heart") where I say in the Song info; "The cruel lady in the picture [Sept. 21 2008] was around smiling and laughing and even there when I was figuring the chords [of the song on March 23, 2009]." She really fits to the situation of the song and I really did the song because of her. She may not look so good in the picture but it took me a while to figure out that what was so attractive about her was all in the way she moved. Although we did not become good friends we have stayed on good terms. For me it show how one can still relate to this song even though it is 400 years old. I must say that it is with a bit of humor that I see this song and situation and it is a good example of why some people do not take Jones's melancholy songs very seriously. It seems that Jones was not a truly depressed, melancholy, manic psychotic individual like the genius John Dowland was. I guess Jones and his silly love song will never rate the genius label.

My newest post is the duet 'Once did I serve a cruel heart' (400 years old this year). I wanted to do it because I thought it would fit well into the Choral category but so far I have only recorded the low voice and the main voice is absent. I hope the Soundclick people will understand it really is a Choral song but I will not have time to do the other track for sometime. I sort of like it now in its simplicity. I just learned that you can get a pro version of this song on the CD 'A Musical Dreame' by Michael Chance & David Cordier who recorded it back in 1988. They did 11 of the 21 songs of the 1609 Booke of Jones "A Musicall dreame or the Fourth Booke of Ayres". One song form the Booke that only I have done is 'XII. She hath an eye'. I hope I can do a better mix of it soon and make a movie of it for YouTube. If you like Chance & Cordier's 'Once did I serve a cruel heart' better than mine you will still have to like my 'She hath an eye' the best since there are no other versions of it unless you do you owne.

Trick T. - November 10 & December 6, 2009.





IV. WILL SAID TO HIS MAMMY

1
Will saide to his Mammy That hee woulde goe woo, Faine would he wed but he wot not who, Soft a while my lammy, Stay, and yet abide, Hee like a foole as he was replied, In faith chil haue a wife,a wife, a wife, O what a life doe I lead, For a wife in my bed, I may not tell you, O there to haue a wife, a wife, a wife, O tis a smart to my heart, Tis a racke to my backe, And to my belly.
2
Scarcely was hee wedded, Full a fortnights space, But that he was in a heauie case, Largely was he headded, And his cheekes lookt thinne: And to repent he did thus beginne: A figge for such a wife,a wife, a wife, O what a life doe I lead, With a wife in my bed, I may not tell you, O there to haue a wife, a wife, a wife, O tis a smart to my heart, Tis a racke to my backe, And to my belly.
3
All you that are Batchelars, Be learned by crying will, When you are well to remaine so still, Better for to tarry, And alone to lie, Then like a foole with a foole to crie: A figge for such a wife,a wife, a wife, O what a life doe I lead, With a wife in my bed, I may not tell you, O there to haue a wife, a wife, a wife, O tis a smart to my heart, Tis a racke to my backe, And to my belly.

Source ; A site created by Harald Lillmeyer. Mr. Lillmeyer typed the text from a facsimile on the 1609 booke and preserved the original spelling.
This site can be found at; http://kulturserver-bayern.de/home/harald-lillmeyer/Texte/Downloads/Downloads.html

IV. Will said to his mammy - Notes, Recordings and Comments

There is and old recording of this on an LP - by - maybe Alfred Deller?

A recording of this song is on the CD 'A Musical Dreame' by Michael Chance, David Cordier, Erin Headley, Stephen Stubbs & Andrew Lawrence-King (Released 09/05/1990), on Tragicomedia & Hyperion #66335.

Notes from Edward Doughtie's 'Lyrics From Elizabethan Airs , 1596-1622' pages 575, 576 & 577;

Forbes' Cantus (1662) sig. X2 - X2v ("The Fiftytwo Song"), with the following variants
!!! Slone 1489 (mid 17 century), fol. 6, !!

Publishing History

From a site called 'Heigh! Nonny Nonny! - Welcome to British Song!'
"Duet: Will Said To His Mammy that hee woulde goe woo ( 1609 [Forth Booke 1609 #4]) Fast - g - 2 / 2 Anonymous Tenor and baritone / D3 - F4, D3 - D4 Piano Doubleday Anchor / Elizabethan Song Book Pg. 186 of collection. Jones, Robert ( fl.1600 - 1610 [fl.1597 - 1617])" -----------------------------



V. HARK, HARK, WOT YE WHAT?

1
Harke, harke, wot you what nay faith and shall I tell,
I am afraide to die a maid and then lead Apes in hell,
O it makes me sigh and sob with inward griefe,
But if I can but get a man heele yeelde me some reliefe.
2
O it is strange how nature works with me,
My body is spent and I lament mine owne great folly,
O it makes me sigh and powre forth flouds of teares,
Alas poore elte none but thy selfe would liue, hauing such cares.
3
O now I see that fortune frowes on me,
By this good light I haue beene ripe,
O it makes me sigh and sure it will me kill,
When I should sleepe I lie and weepe, feeding on sorrowes still.
4
I must confesse as maides haue vertue store,
Liue honest still against our wils, more fooles we are therefore,
O it makes me sigh, yet hope doth still me good,
For if I can but get a man, with him ile spend my blood.

Source ; A site created by Harald Lillmeyer. Mr. Lillmeyer typed the text from a facsimile on the 1609 booke and preserved the original spelling.
This site can be found at; http://kulturserver-bayern.de/home/harald-lillmeyer/Texte/Downloads/Downloads.html

V. Hark wot ye what? - Notes, Recordings and Comments.

A recording of this song is on the CD 'A Musical Dreame' by Michael Chance, David Cordier, Erin Headley, Stephen Stubbs & Andrew Lawrence-King (Released 09/05/1990), on Tragicomedia & Hyperion #66335.

You can download midi files of all these works from Harald Lillmeyer's site.



VI. MY COMPAINING IS BUT FEIGNING

1
My complayning is but faining,
All my loue is but in iest, fa la la,
And my courting is but sporting,
In most shewing meaning, least. fa la la,
2
Outward sadnesse inward gladnesse,
Representeth in my mind, fa la la,
In most faining most obtaining,
Such good faith in loue I find. fa la la,
3
Towards Ladies this my trade is,
Two minds in one breast I were, fa la la,
And my measure at my pleasure,
Ice and flame my face doth beare. fa la la,

Source ; A site created by Harald Lillmeyer. Mr. Lillmeyer typed the text from a facsimile on the 1609 booke and preserved the original spelling.
This site can be found at; http://kulturserver-bayern.de/home/harald-lillmeyer/Texte/Downloads/Downloads.html

VI. My complaining is but feigning - Notes, Recordings and Comments

!!! Forbes' Cantus (1666), sig. G3 - G3v !!!

A recording of this song is on the CD 'A Musical Dreame' by Michael Chance, David Cordier, Erin Headley, Stephen Stubbs & Andrew Lawrence-King (Released 09/05/1990), on Tragicomedia & Hyperion #66335.

Publishing History

From a site called 'Heigh! Nonny Nonny! - Welcome to British Song!'
"Duet: My Complaining Is But Feigning, all my love is but in jest ( 1609 [Forth Booke 1609 #6]) Fast - C - 2 / 2 Anonymous Tenor and baritone / D3 - G4, D3 - D4 Piano Oxford / English Ayres VI Pg. 35 of collection. Jones, Robert ( fl.1600 - 1610 [fl.1597 - 1617])" ----



VII. ON A TIME IN SUMMER SEASON

1
On a time in summers season,
Iocky late with Ienny walking,
Like a lout made loue with talking,
When he should be doing, Reason
Still he cries, when he should dally,
Ienny sweet, sweet, shall I, shall I.
2
Ienny as most women vse it,
Who say nay when they would haue it,
With a bolde face seemed to craue it,
With a saint looke did refuse it,
Iocky lost his time to dally,
Still he cries, sweet, shall I, shall I.
3
She who knew that backward dealing,
Was a foe to forward longing,
To auoide her owne hearts wronging,
With a sigh loues sute reuealing,
Said Iocky sweet when you would dally,
Doe you cry, sweet, shall I, shall I.
4
Iocky knew by her replying,
That a no is I in wooing,
That an asking without doing,
Is the way to loues denying.
Now he knowes when he would dally,
How to spare, sweet, shall I, shall I.

Source ; A site created by Harald Lillmeyer. Mr. Lillmeyer typed the text from a facsimile on the 1609 booke and preserved the original spelling.
This site can be found at; http://kulturserver-bayern.de/home/harald-lillmeyer/Texte/Downloads/Downloads.html

VII. On a time in summer season - Notes, Recordings and Comments

Notes from Edward Doughtie's 'Lyrics From Elizabethan Airs , 1596-1622' page 578
VII
Cf. Jo1610.XIV.
8, 20 Cf. Tilley M34, "Maids say nay and take it, and W660, "A woman says nay and means aye."

A recording of this song is on the CD 'A Musical Dreame' by Michael Chance, David Cordier, Erin Headley, Stephen Stubbs & Andrew Lawrence-King (Released 09/05/1990), on Tragicomedia & Hyperion #66335.





Part 3 - Airs VIII to XI.

VIII. FAREWELL, FOND YOUTH

1
Farewell fond youth, if thou hadst not beene blinde,
Out of mine eyes thou mightst haue read my mind,
But now I plainely see how thou wouldst faine leaue me;
Sure I was accurst,
Not to goe at first,
Sure I was accurst, O fie no,
Sweet stay and I will tell thee why no.
2
Once more farewell, since first I heard thee speake,
And had but sung farewell, my heart would breake,
But now since I doe find thy loue is like the wind,
What a foole was I,
To be like to die.
What a foole was I, I was not,
Yet say I was a foole I passe not.
3
Woes me alasse, why did I let him goe,
These be the fruites of idle saying no,
Now that he can disproue me, how shall he euer loue me,
Nay but is he gone,
Then I am vndone,
Nay but is he gone, O hold him,
Fie, forty things are yet vntold him.

Source ; A site created by Harald Lillmeyer. Mr. Lillmeyer typed the text from a facsimile on the 1609 booke and preserved the original spelling.
This site can be found at; http://kulturserver-bayern.de/home/harald-lillmeyer/Texte/Downloads/Downloads.html

VIII. Farewell, fond youth - Notes, Recordings and Comments

This is a parody on Robert Jones' most famous song '1600. XII Farewell, dear love' which was quoted by William Shakespeare in Twelfth Night.

A recording of this song is on the CD 'A Musical Dreame' by Michael Chance, David Cordier, Erin Headley, Stephen Stubbs & Andrew Lawrence-King (Released 09/05/1990), on Tragicomedia & Hyperion #66335.

Notes from Edward Doughtie's 'Lyrics From Elizabethan Airs , 1596-1622'
VIII.
Cf. Jo1600.XII [Farewell Dear Love] and [long] note.



IX. HOW SHOULD I SHOW MY LOVE?

1
How should I shew my loue vnto my loue,
But hide it from all eyes saue my loue eyes:
The way by pen ot tond I dare not proue,
Their drifts are oft discouered by the wise,
Lookes are more safe, yet ouer them are spies,
Then whats the way to cosen iealousie,
Which martyrs loue by marking narrowly.
2
By all these wayes may thy affections walke,
Without suspition of the iealous guarde:
Thy whispering tong to her closde eare shall talke,
And be impotunate till be harde,
Papers shall passe lookes shall not be debarde,
To looke for loues young infants in her eyes,
Be franke and bold as the is kind and wife.
3
O who can be so francke as she is kind,
Whose kindnesse merites more then Monarchies,
Boldnesse with her milde grace, grace cannot find,
Onely her wit ouer that doth tyrannize,
Then let her worth and thy loue sympathize,
Sith her worth to thy loue cannot be knowne,
Nor thy loue to her worthinesse be showne.

Source ; A site created by Harald Lillmeyer. Mr. Lillmeyer typed the text from a facsimile on the 1609 booke and preserved the original spelling.
This site can be found at; http://kulturserver-bayern.de/home/harald-lillmeyer/Texte/Downloads/Downloads.html

IX. How should I show my love? - Notes, Recordings and Comments

Notes from Edward Doughtie's 'Lyrics From Elizabethan Airs , 1596-1622'
IX. How Should I
11 harde. I.e., heard.
13 infants in her eyes. Cf. Tilley B8, "To look babies in anothers eyes" i.e., to see one's reflection in the pupil of another's eyes (from" pun on pupilla, according to Gardner, p. 184). Cf. Donne, "The Ecstasy," lines 11-,12; and At1622.IIII.9.

I do not know of any recordings of this song. I do not think it is available on CD, MD, LP, 45 or 78.

You can download midi files of all these works from Harald Lillmeyer's site.



X. 0 HE IS GONE

O he is gone and I am here
Aye me why are wee thus deuided,
My sight in his eyes, did appeare
My soule by his soules thought was guided
Then come againe my all my life, my being,
Soules, zeale, harts ioy, cares gester, eyes onely seeing.
Come sable care sease on my heart,
Take vp the roomes that ioyes once filled,
Natures sweet blisse is slaine by Art,
A sence blacke frost lines spring hath killed
Then come againe, my loue, my deere, my treasure,
My blisse, my fate, my end, my hopes full measure.

X. 0 he is gone - Notes, Recordings and Comments

Notes from Edward Doughtie's 'Lyrics From Elizabethan Airs , 1596-1622'
X. O he is gone
7 sease. I.e., sieze.
10.Absence ... liues. I.e., Absence's ... life's.

I do not know of any recordings of this song. I do not think it is available on CD, MD, LP, 45 or 78.



XI. AND IS IT NIGHT?

And is it night, are they thine eyes that shine,
Are we alone and here and here alone
May I come neere may I but touch, but touch thy shrine
Is Jelousie a sleepe, and is he gone,
O Gods no more, silence my lippes with thine,
Lippes kisses Ioyes happe blessings most diuine.
O come my deare our griefes are turnde to night,
And night to ioyes, night blinds pale enuies eyes,
Silence and sleepe prepare vs our delight,
O cease we then our woes, our griefes our cries,
O vanish words, words doe but passions moue,
O deerest life, ioyes sweet, O sweetest loue.

XI. And is it night? - Notes, Recordings and Comments

Notes from Edward Doughtie's 'Lyrics From Elizabethan Airs , 1596-1622'
XI. And is it night
Cf. Pi1605.XIIII. [The First Booke of Songs (1605) by Francis Pilkington, XIV. Thanks gentle moon]

A recording of this song is on the CD 'A Musical Dreame' by Michael Chance, David Cordier, Erin Headley, Stephen Stubbs & Andrew Lawrence-King (Released 09/05/1990), on Tragicomedia & Hyperion #66335.

I started my own recording of this song in August 2009 in cerebration of the 400 year anniversary of its publication.



Written & compiled by Patrick T. Connolly,
This page was written, compiled & revised on May 9, 2004 & April 15, 2009.
Updated -.
First posted as Part 1 April 15, 2009 - this page is just thrown up quickly and may be divided into smaller Parts.
This is the 400 year anniversary of this booke and I hope to get a little bit of work done on these pages and playing some of its music in cerebration.

Part 1 - Title, Dedication & To the Reader, Airs I to II [+Part 2 & 3 Airs III to XI].

Advance to [still on this page so scroll up]'Part 2 - Airs III to VII.'
Advance to [still on this page so scroll up]'Part 3 - Airs VIII to XI.
Advance to 'Part 4 - Airs XII to XVII.'
Advance to 'Part 5 - Airs XVIII to XXI.



Written & compiled by Patrick T. Connolly,
This page was written, compiled & revised on May 9, 2004 & April 15, 2009.
Updated - November 14, 21 & 22 & 23, & December 6 (this 1st update posted), 2009.
First posted as Part 1 April 15, 2009 - this page is just thrown up quickly and may be divided into smaller Parts.
This is the 400 year anniversary of this booke and I hope to get a little bit of work done on these pages and playing some of its music in cerebration.

Page Bibliography

Edward Doughtie's 'Lyrics From Elizabethan Airs , 1596-1622' Cambridge, Mass. Harvard University Press, 1970.

Music & Letters 1927
The Text of the song Books of Robert Jones
by E. H. Fellowes

The English School of Lutenist Song-Writers Series 2, volume 6. Ultimun vale third booke of ayres (1608) [1605].. Stainer & Bell (1926).

A site created by Harald Lillmeyer that can be found at; http://kulturserver-bayern.de/home/harald-lillmeyer
Look under 'Downloads'.

Heigh! Nonny Nonny! - Welcome to British Song!

http://www.public.asu.edu/~icwwh/#SEC4
http://cfa.asu.edu:591/FMPro?