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Ultimun vale or The third booke of ayres (1605)
by Robert Jones
(Dedicated to Henry, Prince of Wales)
Part 6 - Airs XIX to XXI.
- go to ' The Third Booke, Part 1 - Airs I to IV '
- go back to ' The Third Booke, Part 5 - Airs XVII to XVIII '

© Patrick T. Connolly June, 2002

XIX. AT HER FAIRE HANDS HOW HAUE I GRACE ENTREATED.
19.
1
At her faire hands how haue I grace entreated,
With prayers oft repeated,
Yet still my loue is thwarted,
Heart, let her goe, for sheele [she'll] not be conuerted
Say, shall shee go,
O no; no, no, no, no.
Shee is most faire though she be marble hearted.
2
How often haue my sighes declarde [declared] my anguish,
Wherein I daily languish,
Yet doth she still procure it,
Heart, let her goe, for I cannot endure it,
Say, shall shee go,
O no; no, no, no, no.
Shee gaue the wound, and shee alone must cure it.
3
The trickling tears, that down my cheeks haue flowed
My loue hath often shewed [showed]:
Yet still vnkind I proue her,
Heart, let her goe, for nought I do can moue her
Say, shall shee go,
O no; no, no, no, no.
Though me she hate, I cannot chuse [choose] but loue her.
4
But shall I still a true affection beare her,
Which prayers, sighes, teares do shew [show] her?
And shall she still disdaine me ?
Heart, let her goe, if they no grace can gaine me,
Say, shall shee go,
O no; no, no, no, no.
She made me hers, and hers she will retaine me.
5
But if the loue that hath, and still doth burne me
No loue at length returne me:
Out of my thoughts Ile [I'll] set her:
Heart, let her goe, O, heart I pray thee let her.
Say, shall shee go,
O no; no, no, no, no.
Fixt [Fixed] in the heart, how can the heart forget her ?
6
But if I weepe and sigh, and often wayle [wail] me,
Till teares, sighes, prayers faile me,
Shall yet my loue perseuer ?
Heart, let her goe, if she will right thee neuer:
Say, shall shee go,
O no; no, no, no, no.
Tears, sighes, prayers faile, but true loue lasteth euer.

words by: Walter Davison

Source ; Harald Lillmeyer
www.harald-lillmeyer.kulturserver.de
Online text copyright c, Harald Lillmeyer

XIX. At her fair hands how have I grace entreated

Notes from Edward Doughtie's 'Lyrics From Elizabethan Airs , 1596-1622'
"Still another poem from (D) A Poetical Rhapsody (1602) ... It is in a group of poems assigned to Walter Davison in the first three editions. The first two stanzas were later set to music by (E) Martin Peerson in his Priuate Musicke (1620), No. IX () ... "

no, no, no, no.
Twelfth Night - page 201. - marble hearted. p??

David Greer XII. Farewell, dear love ??? see ? XVII. Now let her change and spare not?????

15. Shall I bid her go, and spare not?
16. O no, no, no, no, no, I dare not.

" ?p.231? ...allusion to At her fair hands... --- ... W. Davison - in turn was set by Jones 1605 XIX, & M. Peerson ..." David Greer

Musica Britannica - Collected English Lutenist Partsongs I - Edited by David Greer 70 partsongs by Michael Cavendish, Robert Jones, Francis Pilkington and John Bartlett are presented in four‚part score with lute tablature and transcription. First published in 1987.



XX. OFT HAVE I MUZED THE CAUSE TO FIND
20.
Oft haue I muzde [ed] the cause to finde. 1 Oft haue I muz'd the cause to finde,
Why loue in Ladies eyes should dwell,
I thought because him selfe was blinde,
Hee lookt [looked], that they should guide him well,
And sure his hope but seldome failes,
For loue [Loue (Cupid the capitalized god)] by Ladies [ladies] eyes pruailes.
2
But time at last hath taught me wit,
Although I bought my wit full deare:
For by her eyes my heart is hit,
Deepe is the wound, though none appeare,
Their glancing beames, as dartes he throwes,
And sure he hath no shaftes but those.
3
I muz'd to see their eyes so bright,
And little thought they had beene fire.
I gaz'd vpon them with delight,
But that delight hath bred desire:
What better place can loue require,
Then that where growe both shaftes and fire.

Source ; Harald Lillmeyer
www.harald-lillmeyer.kulturserver.de
Online text copyright c, Harald Lillmeyer

XX. Oft have I mused the cause to find - Notes, Recordings and Comments

Notes from Edward Doughtie's 'Lyrics From Elizabethan Airs , 1596-1622'
"From A Poetical Rhapsody (1602) ..."



XXI. NOW HAUE I LEARND WITH MUCH ADOO AT LAST.
21.
1
Now haue I learnd with much adoo at last
By true disdaine to kill desire:
This was the marke at which I shot so fast
Vnto this height I did aspire,
Proud loue, now do thy worst and spare not
For thee and all thy shaftes I care not. [9 syllables]
2
What hast thou left wherewith to moue my minde ?
What life to quicken dead desire ?
I count thy words and oathes as light as winde,
I feele no heate in all thy fire.
Go change thy bow and get a stronger,
Go breake thy shaftes and buy thee longer. [9 syllables]
3
In vaine thou baitst thy hooke with beauties blaze,
In vaine thy wanton eyes allure,
These are but toyes for them that loue to gaze,
I know what harme thy lookes procure:
Some strange conceit must be deuis'd [deuised],
Or thou and all thy skill despis'd [despised]. [8 syllables with no 'ed']

Source ; Harald Lillmeyer
www.harald-lillmeyer.kulturserver.de
Online text copyright c, Harald Lillmeyer

XXI. Now have I learned with much ado - Notes, Recordings and Comments

I don't know of any recordings of this song. Harald Lillmeyer has made a midi file of the song.

Notes from Edward Doughtie's 'Lyrics From Elizabethan Airs , 1596-1622'
"From A Poetical Rhapsody (1602) where it is entitled "Ode XIII." and ends with the line "Scilcet asserui iam me fugique catenas" (... Ovid Amores III. xi.3) As ... There are no variant. A late MS note in one of the copies of A Poetical Rhapsody (1608) assigns it to Raleigh but ..."
9 words ... winde. Cf. XVIII. 15 and note.
13 baitst thy hooke. Cf. Tilley B50.



All materials are copyright © Patrick Thomas Connolly, 2002