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Ultimun vale or The third booke of ayres (1605)
by Robert Jones
(Dedicated to Henry, Prince of Wales)
Part 5 - Airs XVI to XVIII.
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16. DISDAIN THAT SO DOTH FILL ME
1
Disdaine that so doth fil me,
Hath surely sworne to kill mee,
And I must dye:
Desire that still doth burne me,
To life againe will turne me,
And liue must I:
O kill me then disdain,
That I may liue againe.
2
Thy lookes are life vnto me,
And yet thy lookes vndoo me:
O death and life:
Thy smiles some rest do shew [show] me,
Thy frownes with warre orethrow [o'erthrow] me:
O peace and strife:
Nor life, nor death is either,
Then giue me both or neither.
3
Life onely cannot ease me,
Death onely cannot please me,
Change is delight:
I liue, that death may kill me,
I dye, that life may fill me,
Both day and night,
If once despaire decay,
Desire will weare away.

Source ; A site created by Harald Lillmeyer. Mr. Lillmeyer typed the text from a facsimile of the 1605 booke and preserved the original spelling. This text is copyright by Harald Lillmeyer, 2004 and is used by his most kind permission. I have [bracketed] some of the words to make them more understandable. This site can be found at; http://kulturserver-bayern.de/home/harald-lillmeyer/Texte/Downloads/Downloads.html

XVI. Disdain that so doth fill me - Notes, Recordings and Comments

Notes from Edward Doughtie's 'Lyrics From Elizabethan Airs , 1596-1622'
"Another poem taken from A Poetical Rhapsody (1602) ... Another setting for four voices by Martin Peerson is in his (E) 'Priuate Musicke (1620) ... "



17. NOW LET HER CHANGE AND SPARE NOT - Words by Thomas Campian
1
Now let her change and - - - spare not.
Now let her change and spare - - - not.
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Since she proves strange I care not.
Since she proves strange I care - - - - - - not.
- - - - - - Feigned - - - love so bewitched my delight,
Feigned love so bewitched my delight,
- - - - - - - That still I doted on her sight.
That still I do -- ted - - - on - - her sight.
- - - - - - - - - - - - But she is gone, new desires embracing,
But she is gone, - - - - - - is gone, new desires embracing,
And my deserts, - - - - and my deserts, and my - deserts, disgracing.
- - - - - - - And my deserts, - - - - and my deserts, disgra - - - - cing.

But she is gone, - - - is gone, new desires embracing,
- - - - - - - - - But she is gone, new desires embracing,
- - - - - - - - - And my deserts, - - - - - - and my deserts, - - - em - bra - cing.
And my deserts, - - - - - - and my deserts, - - - - and my deserts, embracing.
2
When I did err in blindness,
Or vex her with unkindness?
If my heart did attend her alone'
Why is she thus untimely gone?
True love abides to the day of dying,
False love is ever, false love is ever, false love is ever flying.

True love abides, abides to the day of dying,
False love is ever, false love is ever flying.
3
Then false farewell for ever,
Once false prove faithful never,
He that now so triumphs in thy love,
Shall soon my present fortunes prove.
Were he as fair, as fair, as divine Adonis,
Fath is not had, fath is not had, fath is not had, where none is.

Were he as fair, as fair as divine Adonis,
Fath is not had, fath is not had, where none is.

Source ; The English School of Lutenist Song-Writers Series 2, Volume 6. Ultimun vale third booke of ayres (1608 [1605]). by Robert Jones, Edited by Edmund H. Fellowes, Stainer & Bell (1926).

XVII. Now let her change and spare not - Notes, Recordings and Comments

In Campion's time there were, three published setting of his poem, his own, Jones's and Francis Pilkington's.

Notes from Edward Doughtie's 'Lyrics From Elizabethan Airs , 1596-1622'
"Campion published his owne setting of his poem in his 'Third booke of Aires' (c. 1613). ... Pilkington also composed a setting (1605. VIII) ... ... The text in Jones and Pilkington probably represents Campion's own earlier version. ...
As David Greer has shown (N & Q, CCX [1965]) Thomas Heywood parodies this song in The Rape of Lucrece (1608) ... "

Jones makes this song into a duet whereas Pilkington and Campion set it as a straight forward lute song. Jones stretches out the music, and repeats words of the last two, repeated, lines of the stanzas, whereas Campion just repeats these last two lines. Where Jones's text varies from Pilkington I have put the words in bold lettering. You can see the Pilkington text on my 'Brief Francis Pilkington Page.' Doughtie only listed the variants of the text between Jones and Campion.

I don't believe Jones's setting of 'Now let her change and spare not' has ever been recorded nor do I know of recordings of Campion's setting, of his own lyrics, among the many recordings made of his songs. However Pilkington's version has just been recorded by Bruce Scott and Olav Chris Henriksen on 'Music dear solace to my thoughts' (2002) a CD with all Pilkington works on it.

Patrick T. Connolly June, 2002



18. SINCE FIRST DISDAINE BEGAN TO RISE.
Since first disdaine beganne to rise
And crye reuenge for spightfull wrong
What erst I praisde[ed] I now despise,
And thinke my loue was too too long.
I treade in durt that scornefull pride,
Which in thy lookes I haue discride [ed]
Thy beautie is a painted skinne
For fools to see their faces in.

Thine eyes that some as stars esteeme,
From whence themselues, they say take light,
Like to the foolish fire I deeme,
That leades men to their death by night.
Thy words and oathes as light as wind,
And yet far lighter is thy mind:
Thy friendship is a broken reed:
That fales thy friends in greatest need.

Source ; A site created by Harald Lillmeyer. Mr. Lillmeyer typed the text from a facsimile of the 1605 booke and preserved the original spelling. This texts copyright Harald Lillmeyer, 2004 and is used by his most kind consent. I have [bracketed] some of the words to make them more understandable. This site can be found at; http://kulturserver-bayern.de/home/harald-lillmeyer/Texte/Downloads/Downloads.html

XVIII. Since first disdain began to rise - Notes, Recordings and Comments

Notes from Edward Doughtie's 'Lyrics From Elizabethan Airs , 1596-1622'
"Another poem from (D) A Poetical Rhapsody (1602) ... where it is headed "Being scorned and distained, hee inueighs against his Lady " it ends "Vitijs patienta victa est" (Ovid Amores III. xi.1). Assigned to Anomos and "A. W." as in No. XI. Also set (E) by Martin Peerson, 'Priuate Musicke (1620) No. VIII (sigs. CIV - C2).The variant are; ...
13 words ... winde. Tilley W833.
15 broken reed. Cf. Tilley R61; see Isaiah 36:6 and II Kings 18:21."

Publishing History

Elizabethan Two - Part Songs published by Stainer and Bell. Page 17 of collection. A duet: Fast - Bb - 3 / 4 Anonymous Tenor and Tenor / F3 - F4, F3 - F4 Piano


This page was written & compiled by Patrick Connolly.
All materials are copyright Patrick Thomas Connolly 2003 & 2004.
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Page Bibliography

The English School of Lutenist Song-Writers Series 2, Volume 6. Ultimun vale third booke of ayres (1608 [1605]). by Robert Jones, Edited by Edmund H. Fellowes, Stainer & Bell (1926).

M. P. Tilley, A Dictionary of the Proverbs in England in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries (Ann Arbor, 1950)

A site created by Harald Lillmeyer that can be found at; http://kulturserver-bayern.de/home/harald-lillmeyer Look under Downloads.