Ultimun vale Part 3
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Ultimun vale or The third booke of ayres 1605
by Robert Jones
(Dedicated to Henry, Prince of Wales)

Part 3 - Airs IX to X.
- go back to ' The Third Booke, Part 2 - Airs V to VIII '
- go to ' The Third Booke, Part 4 - Airs XI to XVII '


IX. BLAME NOT MY CHEEKS

1. Blame not my cheeks, though pale with love they be;
2. The kindly heat into my heart is flown
3. To cherish it that is dismayed by thee,
4. Who art so cruel and unstedfast grown.
5. For nature, called for by distressed hearts,
6. Neglects and quite forsakes the outer parts.

7. But they whose cheeks with careless blood are stained,
?8. Nurse not one spark of love within their hearts;
9. And when they woo they speak with passion feigned,
10. For their fat love lies in their outward parts;
?11. But in their breasts, where Love his court should hold,
12. Poor Cupid sits and blows his nails for cold.

IX. Blame not my cheeks - Notes, Recordings and Comments

Notes from Edward Doughtie's 'Lyrics From Elizabethan Airs , 1596-1622' Cambridge, Mass. Harvard University Press, 1970.

IX. This poem is by Thomas Campion was first printed in (D) Rossetter's Booke of Ayres, (1601), Part I, No. XIIII (Vivian, p. 13). It was then reprinted in (E) A Poetical Rhapsody (1602), RPR, I, 215, entitled "Vpon his Palenesse" and sighned "Th. Campion." Jones text varies thus:

2 into] vnto (D)
9 within] with (E)
12 brest] brests (D)(E)

Given these variations, in Jones' text between the Rossetter Book and 'A Poetical Rhapsody', it is a toss up as to which source he got the poem from. It is also possible that Jones got the lyric from Rosseter or even Campian himself. There is no doubt that he had access to 'A Poetical Rhapsody' because many poem in this, his third book, were taken from it.

In the preface to Philip Rosseter's books of airs Rosseter (or Campian?) says, regarding Campian's lyrics, that some of them had been poorly set by others. Their 1601 volume was to rectify that. Could Jones setting of 'Blame not my cheeks,' if it was made before 1601, be an example of what Rosseter (and or Campian?) were talking about? If so Jones had lots of time to improve the song. There are only a couple, of other surviving examples, of different settings of the Campion lyrics that were printed in the 1601 book.

Another lyric from Rosseter's books, that Jones set, was 'When to her lute Corida sings.' Jones made this into a two part Madrigal.

"IX Blame Not My Cheeks" is followed by another setting of a Campion poem; " X. There Is A Garden In Her Face". This following poem could not have come from 'A Poetical Rhapsody'.

There is a midi file of this song that was made by Mr. Harald Lillmeyer. It is available on his site at; http://kulturserver-bayern.de/home/harald-lillmeyer

I don't know of any recording of Jones' setting of 'Blame Not My Cheeks' but Campion's setting of his own lyrics is on the following recording;

Move now with measured sound - Thomas Campion (1567-1620)
Robin Blaze countertenor, Elizabeth Kenny, David Miller lutes, Jeanna Levine, Mark Levy viols. Recorded on 8-10 January 2001. Hyperion Records, Compact Disc CDA67268
http://www.hyperion-records.co.uk/composer_section.asp?start=bp&end=fez

This is a poem that I have always liked.

© Patrick T. Connolly January & March, 2002. Revised July 28, 2006.



X. THERE IS A GARDEN IN HER FACE

1. There Is A Garden In Her Face
2. Where roses and white lilies grow;
3. A heavenly paradise is that place,
4. Wherein these fruits do flow
5. There cherries grow which none can buy,

6. Till Cherry ripe, cherry ripe, ripe, ripe,
cherry ripe, ripe, ripe, ripe,
cherry ripe, ripe, cherry ripe,
cherry ripe, ripe, ripe, ripe, themselves do cry.

7. These cherries fairly do enclose
8. Of orient pearl a double row,
9. Which when her lovely laughter shows,
10. They look like rose buds filled with snow;
11. Yet them no peer nor prince may buy,

12. Till Cherry ripe, cherry ripe, ripe, ripe,
cherry ripe, ripe, ripe, ripe,
cherry ripe, ripe, cherry ripe,
cherry ripe, ripe, ripe, ripe, themselves do cry.

13. Her eyes like angels watch them still;
14. Her brows like bended bows do stand
15. Threat'ning with piercing shafts to kill
16. All that presume with eye or hand
17. Those sacred cherries to come nigh,

18. Till Cherry ripe, cherry ripe, ripe, ripe,
cherry ripe, ripe, ripe, ripe,
cherry ripe, ripe, cherry ripe,
cherry ripe, ripe, ripe, ripe, themselves do cry.


X. There is a garden in her face - Notes, Recordings and Comments

Notes from Edward Doughtie's 'Lyrics From Elizabethan Airs, 1596-1622' Cambridge, Mass. Harvard University Press, 1970.

X. Thomas Campion published his own setting of his poem several years later in his (D) Fourth Booke of Ayres, (c.1617), No. VII (Sig. H2). In the meantime, Richard Alison, had published a third setting in (E) An Howres Recreation in Musicke (1606), No. XIX-XX (Cantus Primus, sigs. D2-D3) According to Davis (p. 498), BM MSS Add. 17786-17791, No. 20, is a five-part instrumental piece entitled "There Is A Garden." A MS copy of the treble and bass of Jones's setting is in (F) BM Egerton 2971 (c.1620), p6. The variants from DE are:

4 these] all DE
5 which] that (E)
can] may DE
7 These] Those DE
11 no] not D
may] can D
15 shaftes] frownes D E
16 presume] attempt D, approch E
17 Those] These E

Davis [Campian's second biographer Walter R. Davis,The Works of Thomas Campion (New York, 1967)] (p. 174, n.) says that the source of this song may be in Thomas Morley's First Booke of Balletts to Five Voyces (1595), No. XVI:

Lady those cherries plentie,
Which grow out of your lips daintie,
Ere long will fade & languish,
Then now, while yet they last them,
O let mee pull and tast them.

Jones was the first to publish this poem. The coupling of 'There is a garden in her face' and 'Blame not my cheeks,' seems to be the only example of Jones putting two lyrics that shared the same author in concurrent order. In this, his third book, and his next book (The first booke of Madrigals 1607) Jones used many lyrics from 'A Poetical Rhapsody ' (1602). There does not appear to be any pattern, in the order of the songs, according to authors. Poems from 'A Poetical Rhapsody ' sometimes follow each other but often we don't know who the author is.

There is a midi file of this song that was made by Mr. Harald Lillmeyer. It is available on his site at; http://kulturserver-bayern.de/home/harald-lillmeyer

It could be that the first published recording Jones's setting of 'There is a garden in her face' was done by a group called Aitone. They have posted this demo version as an mp3 file on their web site at;
http://www.aitone.org.uk/about.shtml
In this version they made the song sound lush and beautiful in comparison to the straighter poetic Campion readings.

Aitone was formed in the autumn of 2005 and is based in the east Midlands town of Long Eaton (UK).
Aitone are: Erica Coleman, Heather Howe, Rob Durk, Hazel Myszka, Alan Hargreaves, John Nickols, Ginny Hart, Pamela Nickols and Tim Shephard.

Rob Durk has 'adopted' Jones as his composer on the Choral Public Domain Library. Information and multi media content about Robert Jones can be found on this CPDL site at;
http://www.cpdl.org/wiki/index.php/Main_Page

Campion's setting of his own lyrics is on the following two recordings.

English Ayres by Thomas Campion - The English Ayre
Michael Chance (countertenor) and Nigel North (lute) Ayre No. 13 on the CD.
Released in 2000 on Linn Records.
Linn Records web site: http://www.linnrecords.com

Thomas Campion Lute Songs
Steven Rickards (countertenor) and Dorothy Linell (lute)
Ayre No. 20 on the CD. Released in 1999. Naxos››8.553380 Naxos Internet site: http://www.hnh.com


- © Patrick T. Connolly January & March, 2002, (June 30, 2002 (2:37am)) . Revised July 28, 2006.

- go back to ' The Third Booke, Part 2 - Airs V to VIII '
- go to ' The Third Booke, Part 4 - Airs XI to XVII '
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Page Bibliography

Edward Doughtie's 'Lyrics From Elizabethan Airs , 1596-1622' Cambridge, Mass. Harvard University Press, 1970.

The English School of Lutenist Song-Writers Series 2, volume 6. Ultimun vale third booke of ayres (1608) [1605].. Stainer & Bell (1926).

A site created by Harald Lillmeyer that can be found at; http://kulturserver-bayern.de/home/harald-lillmeyer
Look under 'Downloads'.

Aitone's web site at; http://www.aitone.org.uk/about.shtml

the Choral Public Domain Library. Information and multi media content about Robert Jones can be found on this CPDL site at;
http://www.cpdl.org/wiki/index.php/Main_Page


Updated Jult 28, 2006, this page was written & compiled by Patrick Connolly.
All materials are copyright © Patrick Thomas Connolly, 2002 & 2006.