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Ultimun vale or The third booke of ayres (1605) by Robert Jones (Dedicated to Henry, the Prince of Wales)
Part 1 - Introduction & Airs I to IV (of 21 airs).

Proceed to ' The Third Booke, Part 2 - Airs V to VIII '
Go way ahead to ' The Third Booke, Part 3 - Airs IX to X '


ULTIMVN VALE with a triplicty of Musicke, WHERE OF
The first part is for the Lute, the Voice, and the Viole Deganbo. The 2. part for the Lute, the Viole, and foure partes to sing. The third part is for two Trebles, to sing either to the Lute, or the Viole or to both, if any please.

Composed by Robert Iones.
Que prosunt sungula, multa iuuant.
Printed at London by Iohn Windet, and are to be sold by Simon Waterson, in Powles Churchyeard, at the Signe of the Crowne. 1605.

SPIRO NON TIBI


Under Construction.
This is an unfinished page that I hope to edit sometime in the future.


TO THE GREAT IOY AND HOPE OF PRESENT AND FUTURE
Times, HENRIE Prince of Wales. Duke Of Cornwell.
Earle of the Countie Palatine of Chester, Knight of the Honourable Order of the Garter, Heyre Apparant to the Realmes of England, Scotland, France and Ireland.

MOst Excellent Prince, ... your Princely nature promiseth it, which makes my boldness hope for a pardon; Vouchsafe me (most excellent Prince) your protection;

ROBERT IONES



To the silent hearer.

The kind of Applause wherewith I have beene rewarded in my former Ayres, by such Gentlemen as can iudge, by the eare, & are not other mens Echoes; hath now this third time giuen me heart from them to hope for the like in these which I have composed, euen to shew my gratitude towardes them, I know euery Father is parriall ouer the issue of his body, and hauing his iudgement corrupted by his affection, is wont to speake his Childrens prayses, according to his own desires, rather then their deserts. It may be, I haue thus ouerlooked this issue of my braine, wherefore, I will onely commend my purpose, to make this last my best, expecting to reade the truth of my selfe out of thy report. And because I am not ignorant enough, to bee grossely taxed by any of our cunning Maisters, nor bigge enough to be flattered or enuyed, I hope I shall not be driuen to enquire out my enemies, to heare of my faults, nor to bespeake my friendes fauours. For howsoever I am set in an vnderfortune, that hath neede of friendship, yet if my workes cannot iustisie me, my wordes shall not, I had rather dye a begger, then liue a boaster: what skill, time, and my continuall practise hath giuen me, here I gladly impart to euery wel-willer, that grauntes me but acceptance for my paines, And so I commit my selfe to thy censure, Farewell.

Robert Iones



Publishing History

1605. The original book was first published in 1605. RISM A/I/4 J644.

1926. Transcribed, Scored and Edited from original edition by Edmund H. Fellowes. The English School of Lutenist Song-Writers Series 2, Volume 6. Ultimun vale third booke of ayres (1608). Original lute accompment has been transcribed from the tablature into modern notation for the piano. London: Stainer & Bell, 57 pages Contents: See below or The Complete Works of Robert Jones.

l971. Facsimile of copy in the Royal College of Music , London. Edited by David Greer. Series: English Lute Songs, Volume 28. Ultimun vale or The third booke of ayres 1605. Menston, England, Scolar Press, 51 pages. Contents: See below or The Complete Works of Robert Jones.



Under Construction.
This is an unfinished page that I hope to edit sometime in the future.



I. DO NOT, O DO NOT PRIZE THY BEAUTY

1. Do not, O do not prize thy beauty at too high a rate.
2. Love to be loved whilst thou art lovely, lest thou love too late.
3. Frowns print wrinkles in thy brows,
4. At which spiteful age doth smile;
5. Women in their forward vows
6. Glorying to beguile.
Frowns print wrinkles in thy brows,
At which spiteful age doth smile;
Women in their forward vows
Glorying to beguile.

7. Wert thou the only world's admired, thou canst love but one;
8. And many have before been loved, thou art not loved alone.
9. Couldst thou speak with with heavenly grace,
10. Sappho might with thee compare.
11. Blush the roses in thy face,
12. Rosamund was as fair.
Couldst thou speak with with heavenly grace,
Sappho might with thee compare.
Blush the roses in thy face,
Rosamund was as fair.

13. Pride is the the canker that consumeth beauty in her prime.
14. They that delight in long debating feel the curse of time.
15. All things with the time do change
16. That will not the time obey
17. Some e'en to themselves feel strange
18. Through their own delay.
All things with the time do change
That will not the time obey
Some e'en to themselves feel strange
Through their own delay.

Source ; The English School of Lutenist Song-Writers Series 2, Volume 6. Ultimun vale third booke of ayres (1608 [1605]). by Robert Jones, Edited by Edmund H. Fellowes, Stainer & Bell (1926).

I. Do not, O do not prize thy beauty - Notes, Recordings and Comments

Notes from Edmond Fellowes 'English Madrigal Verse;
"Vivian (p. liv) tentatively suggests Campion as the author of this poem"
Notes from Edward Doughtie's 'Lyrics From Elizabethan Airs , 1596-1622';
"... It is possible that this poem and perhaps others in Jones's books are by Campion, for Jones published settings of three poems before Campion himself did ... Walter R. Davies (p. 508) cites further evidence: the second stanza resembles 2Camp[1613] VII and 3Camp[1617] VI; and the song appears among other Campion songs in the MSS described below.

Copies of this song with Jones 's music are in (D) [the Giles Earle's Songbook] BM MS Add. 24665 (c. 1615-1626), fols. 13v-14 (melody and bass); (E) NLS Advocates' MSS 5.2.14 (c. 1639), fol. 5 (melody only) : (F) NLS MS La. III 490. - fol. 31 ... and (G) NLS MS La. III 483. fol. 190 (first line with melody only). The varints ... are ...

13 Rosamund. Probably the mistress of Henry II and subject of Samuel Daniel's Complaint of Rosamund (1592) and Thomas Deloney's ballad "Fair Rosamund" ...
17 - 18 All ... obey. Cf. Tilley T313.
"



II. BEAUTY SAT BATHING BY A SPRING

1.›Beauty sat bathing by a spring
2.› › Where fairest shades did hide her;
3.›The winds blew calm, the birds did sing,
4.› ››The cool streams ran beside her.
5.› My wanton thoughts entic'd mine eye
6.› › To see what was forbidden:
7.› But better memory said, fie!
8.›› ›So vain desire was chidden.
9.› ››Hey nonny, nonny, &c.

10. Into a slumber then I fell,
11. ›When fond imagination
12. Seemed to see, but could not tell
13. ›Her feature or her fashion.
14. But even as babes in dreams do smile,
15. ›And sometime fall a-weeping,
16. So I awak'd, as wise this while
17.› As when I fell a-sleeping.
18.› › ›Hey nonny, nonny, &c.

From: Munday's life and works ... ANTHONY MUNDAY (1560-1633)
Original Text: Englands Helicon [Poems collected and edited by John Bodenham or L. N.] (London: J. R. for J. Flasket, 1600). STC 3192
First Publication Date: 1600.
Composition Date: not known.
Form: ababcdcd [and chorus].
1. This poem is signed "Shepherd Tony", but since it appeared again in a romance, Primaleon of Greece, 1619, by Munday, the poem is usually attributed to him.

Source ; The poem and notes above were take from *'Poetry On-line' and are used by permission.

II. Beauty sat bathing by a spring- Notes, Recordings and Comments

I have always thought 'Tony' was a nick name for 'Anthony' so, to me, that name in 'Englands Helicon' only strengthens the case that the poem is Munday's.

This poem was also set also by; Francis Pilkington in his book of airs, 1605 and William Corkine in his first book published in 1610. See Edward Doughtie's 'Lyrics From Elizabethan Airs , 1596-1622' for more information.

I don't know of any recordings of this song but the sheet music is available on line in 'The Song Archive' of 'Musica Viva' at; http://www.musicaviva.com/recorder/list.tpl?list=composernor&no=1&phrase=robert+jones
This is the only Robert Jones sheet music I have ever found on line.

The text from a facsimile of this 1605 booke is typed, with the original spelling preserved, on a site created by Harald Lillmeyer. Mr. Lillmeyer also created a midi files of all the songs in this booke, as well asall the songs in Jones's 4th and 5th bookes. This site can be found at; http://kulturserver-bayern.de/home/harald-lillmeyer/Texte/Downloads/Downloads.html

There is an epigram, written by Campian in his 'Book II' of 'The Epigrams Of Thomas Campion,' written to Munday. Dr. D. F. Sutton from The University of California has a wonderful web site on Thomas Campion's Latin poetry. This epigram, following, is quoted from that **site. (The Latin comes first followed by Dr. Sutton's English translation.) - P. T. Connolly


216. IN MUNDUM

1. Mundo libellos nemo vendidit plures,
2. novos, stiloque a plebe non abhorrenti;
3. quos nunc licet lectoribus minus gratos
4. librarii emptitant, ea tamen lege
5. ne Mundus affigat suis suum nomen.

216. ON MUNDUS

Nobody in the world sells more books than Mundus, original ones, written in a style not abhorrent to the common man. Which (though they are less popular with readers) the booksellers buy up, but only on this condition: that Mundus doesn't affix his name to them.



3. GO TO BED, SWEET MUSE

1
Goe to bed sweete Muze take thy rest,
Let not thy soule bee so opprest,
Though shee deny thee,
Shee doth but trie thee,
Whether thy mind Will euer proue vnkinde:
O loue is but a bitter-sweete Iest.
2
Muze not vpon her smiling lookes,
Thinke that they are but baited hookes,
Loue is a fancy,
Loue ia a Franzy,
Let not a toy,
Then breed thee such annoy,
But leaue to looke vppon such fond bookes.
3
Learne to forget such idle toyes,
Fitter for youthes, and youthfull boyes,
Let not one sweete smile
Thy true loue beguile,
Let not a frowne
For euer cast thee downe,
Then sleepe and go to bed in these ioyes.

Source ; A site created by Harald Lillmeyer. Mr. Lillmeyer typed the text from a facsimile of the 1605 booke and preserved the original spelling. This text is copyright © by Harald Lillmeyer, 2004 and is used by his most kind permission. I have [bracketed] some of the words to make them more understandable. This site can be found at; http://kulturserver-bayern.de/home/harald-lillmeyer/Texte/Downloads/Downloads.html

III. Go to bed, sweet muse - Notes, Recordings and Comments

Notes from Edward Doughtie's 'Lyrics From Elizabethan Airs , 1596-1622'
"Other copies occur in (D) [the Giles Earle's Songbook] BM MS Add. 24665 (c. 1615-1626), fols. 15v-16 with Jones's melody and bass; (E) ... (F) ... the varints are ..."

A recording of this song is on the CD 'The Muses Gardin: Lute Songs by Robert Jones' by Emma Kirkbe and Anthony Rooley (1991), on Virgin Classics. This is the only CD, I know of, that is dedicated entirely to the music of Robert Jones.

The song is also on a 1953 record, 'Elizabethan love songs - fine harpsichord pieces' (Lyrichord LLST 737). Hughes Cuenod sings tenor and Claude Jean Chiasson plays harpsichord on this disk which also contains 'Sweet Kate of late' from Robert Jones' 4th book.

A fourth recording of this song can be found on 'A Russell Oberlin recital' (Decca DL 10032) if you can find this 1961 release. Russell Oberlin is a countertenor and he uses various people as accompaniments. Other Robert Jones songs on this album are; Love is a bable [2nd book], Ite, caldi sospiri [4th book], and 'As I lay lately in a dream' [5th book].



4. SHALL I LOOK TO EASE MY GRIEF?

1
Shall I looke to ease my griefe,
No my sight is lost with eying,
Shall I speake and begge reliefe,
No, my voyce is hoarse with crying
What remaines but onely dying.
2
Loue and I of late did part,
But the boy my peace enuying,
Like a Parthian threw his dart
Backward
, and did wound me flying :
What remaines but onely dying.
3
She whome then I looked on,
My remembrance beautifying
Stayes with me, though I am gone,
Gone, and at her mercy lying.
What remaines but onely dying.
4
Shall I trye her thoughts and write,
No, I haue no meanes of trying :
If I should yet at first sight
She would answere with denying.
What remaines but onely dying.
5
Thus my vitall breath doth waste,
And my bloud with sorrow drying,
Sighes and teares, mak e life to last,
For a while, their place supplying.
What remaines but onely dying.

Source ; A site created by Harald Lillmeyer. Mr. Lillmeyer typed the text from a facsimile of the 1605 booke and preserved the original spelling. This text is copyright © by Harald Lillmeyer, 2004 and is used by his most kind permission. This site can be found at; http://kulturserver-bayern.de/home/harald-lillmeyer/Texte/Downloads/Downloads.html

IV. Shall I look to ease my grief? - Notes, Recordings and Comments

I don't know of any recording of this song. Harald Lillmeyer has made a midi file of this song and it is available on the site above. - P. T. C.

Notes from Edward Doughtie's 'Lyrics From Elizabethan Airs , 1596-1622';
"Set also by Ferrabosco (1609. XVII). Other copies are found in [the Giles Earle's Songbook] BM MS Add. 24665 (c. 1615-1626), fols. 16v-17 with Jones's melody and bass, without variants; (D) ... the first stanza only in (E) Henry Lichfild's First Set of Madrigals of 5. Parts (1613) ... variants ... are ...

8 - 9 Parthian ... Backward This tactic so impressed the Romans, who lost several battles to the Parthians because of it, that it became proverbial ...
25, 27 waste ... last. waste was pronounced to rhyme with last. ...
26 bloud with sorrow drying. ... "


Updated last on April 17, 2004, this page was written & compiled by Patrick Connolly.
All materials are copyright © Patrick Thomas Connolly 2002, 2003 & 2004.
Continue to 'The Third Booke, Part 2 - Airs V to VIII'.
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Page Bibliography

The English School of Lutenist Song-Writers Series 2, Volume 6. Ultimun vale third booke of ayres (1608 [1605]). by Robert Jones, Edited by Edmund H. Fellowes, Stainer & Bell (1926).

M. P. Tilley, A Dictionary of the Proverbs in England in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries (Ann Arbor, 1950)

A site created by Harald Lillmeyer that can be found at; http://kulturserver-bayern.de/home/harald-lillmeyer Look under Downloads.

*Representative Poetry On-line: Editor, I. Lancashire; Tech. Services, Univ. of Toronto Lib. Edition: 2RP.1.235, ed. N. J. Endicott; RPO 1996-2000. © I. Lancashire, Dept. of English, and Univ. of Toronto Press 2000.

**Dana F. Sutton is the Professor of Classics at The University of California 120 Humanities Office Building II, Irvine CA 92692-2000 http://eee.uci.edu/~papyri/campion/epigrams_1.html#173


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