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Updated March 7, February 29, 2004, December 14, 2003. All materials are copyright Patrick Thomas Connolly, 2004.

The Second booke of songes a ayres, set out to the lute the base violl the playne way or the base by tableture after the leero fashion ... Printed by P.S. for Mathew Selman by the assent of Thomas Morley, and are to be sold at the inner temple gate.1601.
[21 pieces] Composed by Robert Jones
The Second Booke - Part 2 - Airs V to XV (of 21 airs).
- Return to 'Part 1 - Title, Dedication, To the Reader and Ayre I to IV. '
Go ahead to 'The Second Booke, Part 3 - Airs XVI to XXI'

Under Construction.
This is an unfinished page that I hope to edit sometime in the future.


Patrick T. Connolly, December 14, 2003.
All materials are copyright Patrick Thomas Connolly, 2003.
Chopped down March 2, 2009.

Source ; The English School of Lutenist Song-Writers Series 2, volume 5. The Second booke of ayres (1601) by Robert Jones, Edited by Edmund H. Fellowes, Stainer & Bell (1926).



V. METHOUGHT THIS OTHER NIGHT

Methought this other night
I saw a pretty sight
That pleased me much.
A fair and comely maid
Not squeamish nor afraid
To let me touch.
Our lips most sweetly kissing,
Each other never missing,
Her smiling looks did show content,
And that she did but what she meant.

And as her lips did move
The echo still was love,
Love, love me, sweet.
Then with a maiden blush,
Instead of crying pish
Our lips did meet.
With music sweetly sounding,
With pleasures all abounding,
We kept the burden of the song,
Which was that love should take no wrong.

And yet, as maidens use,
She seemed to refuse
The name of love;
Until I did protest
That I did love her best.
And so to prove.
With that as both amazed
Each at the other gazed.
My eyes did see, my hands did feel
Her eyes of fire, her breatst of steel.

O when I felt her breast
Where love itself did rest,
My love was such
I could have been content
My best blood to have spent
In that sweet touch.
But now comes that which vexed us,
There was a bar betwixt us,
A bar that barred me from that part,
Where nature did contend with art.

If ever love had power
To send one happy hour,
Then show thy might.
And take such bars away,
Which are the only stay
Of love's delight.
All this was but a dreaming,
Although another meaning.
Dreams may prove true, as thoughts are free.
I will love you, you may love me.

Source ; The English School of Lutenist Song-Writers Series 2, volume 5. The Second booke of ayres (1601) by Robert Jones, Edited by Edmund H. Fellowes, Stainer & Bell (1926).

V. Methought this other night - Notes, Recordings and Comments



VI. WHOSO IS TIED MUST NEED BE BOUND

Whoso is tied must needs be bound, [a, 8 syllables]
And he that's bound cannot be free. [b, 8 syllables]
Whoso is lost is hardly found, (a, 8 syllables]
and he that's blind is barred to see. [b, 8 syllables]
Whoso is watched with jealous eyes [c, 8 syllables]
Must sit up late, (must sit up late) and early rise. [c, 8 syllables]

He may well write that cannot come,
And send his eyes to plead his case.
He may well look that must be dumb,
Until he find both time and place.
He that is tied to hoursand times,
Though not himself, though not himself may send his rhymes.

What hap have they who doth abound,
With all things that the earth doth bear,
And yet for want sometime doth sound,
Breathing a life 'twixt hope and fear.
Alas, poor soul, my case is such;
I want my will, I want my will, yet have too much.

I would, but dare not what I would.
I dare but cannot what I dare.
I can, I must not if I could.
I can, I must I will not spare.
I write no more, but shall I come?
I say no more, I say no more, but closely mum.

Source ; The English School of Lutenist Song-Writers Series 2, volume 5. The Second booke of ayres (1601) by Robert Jones, Edited by Edmund H. Fellowes, Stainer & Bell (1926).

VI. Whoso is tied must need be bound - Notes, Recordings and Comments
Notes from Edward Doughtie's 'Lyrics From Elizabethan Airs , 1596-1622'



VII. FIE, WHAT A COILE IS HERE!

Fie, fie, fie, fie, fie, fie, what a coil is here!
Why strive you so to get a kiss? why strive you so to get a kiss?
Do, do, do, do, do, what you will, do, do, do, what you will, you shall be ne ' er the near.
Had I been willing
So to be billing
You had prevailed long ere this
Sweet, stand away, stand away, stand away, let me alone,
Or else, in faith, or else, in faith, in faith, I ' ll get me gone.

Come, come, come, come, come, come, do you not perceive
I am not yet disposed to yield? I am not yet disposed to yield?
Stay, stay, stay, stay, stay but a while, stay, stay, stay but a while, my love will give you leave.
This my denial
Is but a trial
If faint desire will fly the field.
Whoop! look you now, look you now, look you now, I pray be still.
Nay then, in faith, nay then, in faith, in faith, do what you will.

Source ; The English School of Lutenist Song-Writers Series 2, volume 5. The Second booke of ayres (1601) by Robert Jones, Edited by Edmund H. Fellowes, Stainer & Bell (1926). Typed Feburary 23, 2004.

VII. Fie, what a coil is here - Notes, Recordings and Comments

# ...
In the song " Fie, Fie, What A Coile is Heere, " a change from duple to triple meter is signaled by the viol playing an ascending scale passage set to the rhythm ?-.-.-.-.? . This rhythmic figure is taken up by the voice which sings an entirely different melodic motive. After the shift back to dupe meter, the viol again plays a motive of which the rhythmic profile, but not melodic, is imitated by the voice.
Example 5 Jones, Second Booke, " Fie, Fie, What A Coile is Here," mm.10 -12
... ...
Jones also introdues variation in texture to enhance shifts in meter. In " Fie, Fie, " the viol reinforces a hemiola pattern. Here in measures 10 - 12, full chords are placed on strong beats with single notes on weaker beats.
p. 14
Then, in measure 13, Jones provides a double stop on the fourth beat followed by a fuller chord on the fifth. In addition to this variation in texture to enhance the hemiola pattern, it is also reinforced by the leap downward from G to D.
Example 6 Jones, Second Booke, " Fie, Fie, What A Coile is Here," mm.10 - 14. - p. 13 Deborah Teplow

# Journal of the Viola da Gamba Society of America, Lyra Viol Accompaniment In Robert Jones' The Second Booke of Songs and Ayres (1601) by Deborah Teplow Typed February 27, 2004

A recording of this song is on the CD; The Dark is My Delight Women In Song by Evelyn Tubb (soprano) and Michael Fields (lute) on Musica Oscuura, Columns Classics 070980
This recording is made from manuscript 439, from Christ Church Library , Oxford, and not the printed book.
[ 'The Dark is My Delight' -see facsimile & from 'the Dutch Courtezan' could be Jones? - facsimile also of 'Fie, what a coil is here' check hand - P. T. C. ]

Notes from Edward Doughtie's 'Lyrics From Elizabethan Airs , 1596-1622';

Mss: (D) Bod. Douce 280, fol. 68 (...) headed " Mr. Rob. Iones 2nd booke

Tush, t .. nowe leaue for shame,
My mother comes I pray forbeare.
My mother comes I pray forbeare.
Hark, hark, ... how she calls;
...
Aye me! Here's much to doe:
Think you with kisses, to win loues blisses,
O noe, ... there's more to do.
Whoe: quick dispatch, ...
I shalbe shent:
Now since tis done, ....
I needs must be content.

All materials are copyright Patrick Thomas Connolly, 2003.



VIII. BEAUTY, STAND, FURTHER

Beauty, stand, further!
Repine not at my at my blaming.
Is it not murder
To set my heart on flaming?
Thus hopeless to take
Bare sight of such a glory
Doth tempt me to make
My death beget a story.
Then pity, pity me, pity, pity me, pity, pity me,
least some worse thing ensue it.
My death's true cause, My death's true cause, my death's true cause will force the guilt to rue it.

Is it not better
To love thy friend in good sort,
Then to be debtor
For kindness name to report?
If you had the less
For this rich mercy lending,
Then should I confess
No thrift were in such spending.
O pity, pity me, pity, pity me, pity, pity me, the gain shall be thine own all;
I would but live, I would but live, I would but live to make thy virtues known all.

Source ; The English School of Lutenist Song-Writers Series 2, volume 5. The Second booke of ayres (1601) by Robert Jones, Edited by Edmund H. Fellowes, Stainer & Bell (1926).

VIII. Beauty, stand, further - Notes, Recordings and Comments

I don't know of any recordings of this song.

Notes from Edward Doughtie's 'Lyrics From Elizabethan Airs , 1596-1622';
12 - 15 Is ... report. "Is it not better to love your friend willingly then to owe him love for reporting that you are kind?"



IX. NOW WHAT IS LOVE?

Now what is Love, I pray thee tell?
Is it that fountain and that well
Where pleasures and repentance dwell.
It is perhaps that sauncing bell
That tolls all into heaven or hell.
And this is Love, as I hear tell.

Now what is Love, I pray thee say?
It is a work on holy day.
It is December matched with May,
When lusty blood in fresh array
Hear ten months after of their play.
And this is Love, as I hear say.

Now what is Love, I pray thee fain?
It is a sunshine mixed with rain.
It is a gentle pleasing pain;
A flower that dies and springs again.
It is a No that would full fain.
And this is Love, as I hear sayen.

Now what is Love, I pray thee show?
A thing that creeps, it cannot go;
Aprize that passeth to and fro;
A thing for one, a thing for moe;
And he that proves shall find it so.
And this is Love, as I well know.

Source ; The Muses Gardin: Lute Songs by Robert Jones' by Emma Kirkbe and Anthony Rooley (1991), Virgin Classics.

IX. Now what is love - Notes, Recordings and Comments

The text maybe by Sir Walter Raleigh. See the notes from Edward Doughtie's 'Lyrics From Elizabethan Airs , 1596-1622'

A recording of this song is on; Elizabethan ayres and duets sung in authentic Elizabethan pronunciation. Hyperion. A66003, 1981.

Another recording of this song is on the CD 'The Muses Gardin: Lute Songs by Robert Jones' by Emma Kirkbe and Anthony Rooley (1991), on Virgin Classics. Kirkbe and Rooley recorded four songs from all of Jones's bookes of ayers but his fifth (and last) where they only recorded one song. The other three song, on the CD, from this second booke are; 'I. Love winged my hopes and taught me how to fly', 'X. Love's god is a Boy', and 'XVII. Love is a bable'.



X. LOVE'S GOD IS A BOY

Love's god is a boy,
None but cowards regard him.
Great opinion hath marr'd him.
The fear of the wag
Hath made him so brag.
Chide him, Chide him, chide him, he'll fly thee
And not come nigh thee.
Little, little, little, boy,
Pretty, pretty, pretty, knave,
Shoot not at random,
For if you hit me, for if you hit me, slave,
I'll tell, I'll tell, I'll tell, I'll tell, I'll tell, I'll tell your granddam.

Fond Love is a child,
And his compass is narrow.
Young fools are beguil'd
With the fame of his arrow.
He dareth not strike,
If his stroke do mislike.
Cupid, do you hear me?
Come not too near me.
Little boy, pretty knave, hence I beseech you,
For if you hit me, slave, in faith I'll breech you.

Th' ape loves to meddle
When he finds a man idle.
Else he is a - flirting
When his mark is a courting.
When women grow true,
Come teach me to sue:
Then I ' ll come to thee,
Little boy, pretty knave, make me not stagger,
For if you hit me, slave, I ' ll call thee beggar.

Source ; Oxford University press, Music Department, 1927, 44 Conduit Street London, S, 1.

X. Love's god is a Boy - Notes, Recordings and Comments

A recording of this song is on the CD 'The Muses Gardin: Lute Songs by Robert Jones' by Emma Kirkbe and Anthony Rooley (1991), on Virgin Classics. This is the only CD, I know of, that is dedicated entirely to the music of Robert Jones. The other three song, on the CD, from this second booke are; 'I. Love winged my hopes and taught me how to fly', the ever popular 'IX. Now what is love', and 'XVII. Love is a bable'.

Notes from Edward Doughtie's 'Lyrics From Elizabethan Airs , 1596-1622';
X. 2 cowherds] cowards. Cf Spencer, The Fairy Queen, Bk VI cantos vi, stanza 26 'that craven cowherd knight'.



XI. OVER THESE BROOKS,

Over these brooks, trusting to ease my eyes,
Mine eyes, mine eyes, e ' en great in labour with her tears,
I laid my face, I laid my face, my face, wherein there lies
Clusters of clouds, clusters of clouds, of clouds which no sun ever clears.
In wat ' ry glass, in wat ' ry glass my In wat ' ry eyes I see;
Sorrow ' s ill?eased, sorrow ' s ill?eased where sorrows painted be.

My thoughts imprisoned in my secret woes
With flame, with flame, with flamy breaths do issue oft in sound;
The sound to this, The sound to this strange air no sooner goes
But that it doth, but that it doth with echo ' s fource rebound,
And make me hear, and make me hear the plaints I would refrain;
Thus outward helps, thus outward helps my inward griefs maintain.

Now in this sand I would discharge my mind,
And cast, and cast, and cast from me part of my bur ' nous cares;
But in the sand, but in the sand my tailes foretold I find,
And see therein, and see therein how well the waters fares.
Since streams, air, sand, since streams, air, sand, mine eyes and ears conspire,
What hope to quench, when each thing blows the fire?

Source ; The English School of Lutenist Song-Writers Series 2, volume 5. The Second booke of ayres (1601) by Robert Jones, Edited by Edmund H. Fellowes, Stainer & Bell (1926).

XI. Over these brooks, trusting to ease my eyes - Notes, Recordings and Comments

This poem was written by Sir Philip Sidney - Arcadia Book II. This poem is in iambic pentameter. Typed February 20, 2004



XII. WHITHER RUNNETH MY SWEET HEART?

Whither runneth my sweet heart?
whither runneth my sweet heart? whither runneth my sweet heart?
Stay awhile, prithee.
Not so fast!
Too much haste
Maketh waste.
But if thou wilt needs depart,
Take my love with thee.
Thy mind
Doth bind
Me to no vile condition;
So doth
Thy truth
Prevent me of suspicion.

Go thy ways then where thou please,
go thy ways then where thou please, go thy ways then where thou please,
So I am by thee
Day and night
I delight
In thy sight.
Never grief on me did seize
When thou wast nigh me.
My strength
At length
That scorned thy fair commandings
Hath not
Forgot
The price of rash withstandings.

Now my thoughs are free from strife,
now my thoughs are free from strife, now my thoughs are free from strife,
Sweet, let me kiss thee.
Now can I
Willingly
Wish to die,
For I do but loathe my life
When I do miss thee.
Come prove
My love,
My heart is not disguised.
Love shown
And known
Ought not to be despised.

Source ; The English School of Lutenist Song-Writers Series 2, volume 5.The Second booke of ayres, 1601. Stainer & Bell (1926.).

XII. Whither runneth my sweet heart? - Notes, Recordings and Comments

Recordings of this song are on; - Musik fur Kaiser. Konig Bettemann. by Paul Elliott, (tenor) and Geoffrey Shaw, (baritone) The London Early Music group. RCA 25140, 1978. Also on this record is 'To sigh and to bee sad' from this same second book.
- What pleasure have great princes: William Bird and his contemporaries. The London Music Group. RCA Red Seal CRL 2-2794, 1977. Also on this record is 'To sigh and to bee sad' from this same second book.
- Pastoral Dialogues by The English Consort - Anthony Rooley, dir. (lute) Emmy Kirkby (soprano), David Thomas (bass), Trevor Jones (bass viol)
Recording - [1980 or prior] - Turnabout 34443 (LP)
For more on this LP go to Early Music FAQ at - http://www.medieval.org/emfaq/cds/lol575.htm
L'Oiseau-Lyre "Florilegium" DSLO 575-1 [LP]



XIII. ONCE DID I LOVE

Once did I love, once did I love, once did I love, where now I have no liking.
Like can I not, for she was never loving.
Once did I prove, once did I prove, but then put by my striking.
Strike nill I now, though she were ever proving.
To prove or strike, to prove or strike,
It? now ?Rests at my will;
To make me love or like
' Tis past her skill.

Rest in unrest, rest in unrest, rest in unrest, was once my chiefest pleasure;
Please will I now myself in her disquiet.
Bad for the best, bad for the best,
I choose at wanton leisure,
Ease bids me now to brook a better diet. Rich in content, rich in content, I rest
To see her plaining
Whose best is bad at best, whose best is bad at best,
Not worth the gaining.

Source ; The English School of Lutenist Song-Writers Series 2, volume 5.The Second booke of ayres, 1601. Stainer & Bell (1926.).

XIII. Once did I love - Notes, Recordings and Comments

Notes from Edward Doughtie's 'Lyrics From Elizabethan Airs , 1596-1622'
Typed February 20, 2004



XIV. FAIR WOMEN LIKE FAIR JEWELS ARE,

Fair Women like fair jewels are,
Whose worth lies in opinion.
To praise them all must be his care
That goes about to win one.
And when he hath her once obtained
To her face he must her flatter;
But not to others, lest he move
Their eyes to level at her.

The way to purchese truth in love,
If such way there be any,
Must be to give her leave to rove
And hinder one by many.
Believe thou must that she is fair [true]
When poisoned toungues do sting her;
Rich jewels bear the self same hue
Put upon any finger.

The perfectest of mind and shape
Must look for defamations.
Live how they will, they cannot ' scape;
Their persons are temptations.
Then let the world condemn my choice,
As laughing at my folly;
If she be kind the self same voice
Is spread of the most holy.

Source ; The English School of Lutenist Song-Writers Series 2, volume 5.The Second booke of ayres, 1601. Stainer & Bell (1926.).

XIV. Fair Women like fair jewels are - Notes, Recordings and Comments
Typed February 19 & 20, 2004



XV. DAINTY DARLING KIND AND FREE

Dainty darling kind and free
Fairest maid I ever see,
Dear vouchsafe to look on me;
Listen, listen, listen when I sing, I sing to thee,
What I will do with a dildo, with a dildo,
Sing do, with a dildo, dildo.

Sweet, now, sweet, now, sweet, now go not, Sweet, now go not yet, I pray;
Let no doubt thy mind dismay.
Here with me thou shalt but stay
Only, only, only till I can, I can display
What I will do with a dildo, with a dildo,
Sing do, with a dildo, dildo.

Quickly, quickly, quickly, prithee, quickly, prithee, be now still!
Nay, you shall not have your will.
Trow you men will maidens kill?
Tarry, tarry, tarry but to learn, to learn the skill
What I will do with a dildo, with a dildo,
Sing do, with a dildo, dildo.

Pretty, pretty, pretty, witty, pretty, witty, sit me by,
Fear no cast of any eye;
We will play so privily
None shall, none shall, none shall see but you, but you and I
What I will do with a dildo, with a dildo,
Sing do, with a dildo, dildo.

Source ; The English School of Lutenist Song-Writers Series 2, volume 5.The Second booke of ayres, 1601. Stainer & Bell (1926.).

XV. Dainty darling kind and free - Notes, Recordings and Comments

Notes from Edward Doughtie's 'Lyrics From Elizabethan Airs , 1596-1622'



# Journal of the Viola da Gamba Society of America, Lyra Viol Accompaniment In Robert Jones' The Second Booke of Songs and Ayres (1601) by Deborah Teplow

Source ; The English School of Lutenist Song-Writers Series 2, volume 5.The Second booke of ayres, 1601. Stainer & Bell (1926.).

Patrick T. Connolly, December 14, 2003.
Chopped down March 2, 2009.



Edward Doughtie's 'Lyrics From Elizabethan Airs , 1596-1622' Cambridge, Mass. Harvard University Press, 1970.

The Muses Gardin: Lute Songs by Robert Jones' by Emma Kirkbe and Anthony Rooley (1991), Virgin Classics.

#Penguin English Verse: Volume 2 The seventeenth Century Donne to Rochester. page 40 - 45

M. P. Tilley, A Dictionary of the Proverbs in England in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries (Ann Arbor, 1950)


All materials are copyright Patrick Thomas Connolly, 2003.
Chopped down March 2, 2009.

- Return to 'Part 1 - Title, Dedication, To the Reader and Ayre I to IV. '
Go ahead to 'The Second Booke, Part 3 - Airs XVI to XXI'