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Return to ' The First Booke 1600, Part 1 - Airs I to III'.
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Updated December 14 & 24, 2003 & February 29, 2004 & February 28, 2009.

The Second Booke of Songs and Ayres 1601
[21 pieces]
Composed by Robert Jones
Part 1 - Title, Dedication, To The Reader and Ayre I to IV (of 21 ayres).
Go ahead to - The Second Booke, Part 2 - Ayres V to XV.
Go ahead to - The Second Booke, Part 3 - Ayres XVI to XXI.

Under Construction.
This is an unfinished page that I hope to edit sometime in the future.



THE SECOND BOOKE OF SONGS AND AYRES,
Set out to the Lute the base Violl the playne way or the base by tableture after the leero fashion:

Composed by Robert Iones,
Printed by P.S. for Mathew Selman by the assent of Thomas Morley, and are to be sold at the Inner temple gate. 1601.


This image is from my own playing, colourizing and doctoring of an scan I did from some source but it did not look so good until I overlaid another scan from Harald Lillmeyer's site.
Publishing History

1601. The original book was first published in 1601. (RISM A/I/4 J642).

1926. Transcribed, Scored and Edited by Edmund H. Fellowes : The English School of Lutenist Song-Writers Series 2, Volume 5. The Second booke of ayres (1601) by Robert Jones, London: Stainer a Bell, 1926. 53 pages. For solo voice with lute accompnement transcribed from the tablature into modern notation for piano.

1970. Facsimile edition : Reproduced from the copy at the British Museum. Series: English lute songs, Volume 27. Jones, Robert. The second booke of songs and ayres 1601. Edited by David. Greer. Menston, Eng.: Scolar Press, 1971. 51 pages.


TO THE RIGHT VERTVOVS
AND WORTHY KNIGHT, SIR
HENRY LEONARD.

WORTHY Sir and my Honourable friend: I giue you this Child, I Praie you bring it vp, because I am a poore man and can not maintaine it: it may suffer much aduersitie in my name: your Fortune maie alter his starres and make him happie. Though his Father be aliue, I maie call him an Orphane, for poore mens Children are Orphanes borne, and more to be pittied then they that haue changed their fathers for their lands; such maie raise themselues in due time: we haue no waie to heighten our being, but by another power. As GentIewomen peece themselues with Tires and Coronets,to appeare more personable and tall: so must we adde vnto our littlenes (if we will not be scorned for dwarfes) the crowne of gentle persons more eminent and high. Our statures are not set aboue danger; wee lie lowe, fit for euerie foote to treade vpon: our place is the ground. there is nothing beneath vs, and yet detraction will pull vs lower, if wee haue not good aspects. They will find meanes to digge and let vs downe into the earth, and burie vs before our time: This is the cause or patronage, and this is the persecution of them that would ingrosse all Glorie into their owne hands. But see the rage of these men, hey bite the fruites themselues should feede vpon. Vertue would bring forth manie Children but they hold them in the wombe that they dare not come out. As the couetous man besiegeth all the land about him, with statutes, fines, and bands, and other such like ciuill warre: so doth the ambitious intrap the little portion or anie commendations that maie fall besides him. And like the mercilesse Souldiers; the Castles they cannot take, they blow vp. They are as sparing of euerie small remnant of credit, as if it were laide vp in common-banke; and the more were giuen awaie, the lesse would come to their shares. They are miserable men, I will only brand them with this marke, and let them goe. They were Eagles, if they did not catch flyes, as they are; they are great things, much lesse then nothing. For my part, I will not contend with them. I desire no applause or commendations: let them haue the Fame of Ecchoes and sounds, and let me be a Bird in your Cage, to sing to my selfe and you. This is my cotent, and this is my ambition: if I haue this, I fail not in my expectation, if more for your sake, that is my aduantage, and I wiIl owe you duetie for it; in the meane time I rest,

At your Worships seruice,
ROBERT IONES.

Source ; Edward Doughtie's 'Lyrics From Elizabethan Airs , 1596-1622' Cambridge, Mass. Harvard University Press, 1970, page 148.

Notes from Edward Doughtie's 'Lyrics From Elizabethan Airs , 1596-1622';

" Dedication
Sir Henry Leonard.
Sir Henry Lennard, or Leonard, twelfth, Baron Dacre (1570-1616), was knighted by Essex after Cadiz (1596). (G. E. Cockayne, Complete Peerage, s. v. Darce.) The second Musica Transalpina (1597) compiled by Nicholas Young was also dedicated to him. (Williams)
31 Eagles ... flyes. Cf. Tilley "



TO THE READER.

READER, I have once more aduentured to aske thy counsell, whether I have doone well, or no,. In taking thus much paines to please thee. All that I will say for my selfe, is: My intent towards thee was good, yet because perhaps I know thee not; and I as yet am not growne so confident to warrant my en- deuours against all men: I hold it no shame to craue vprightnesse in thy censure, as I meane not to accuse my selfe of negligence by begging thy fauour; wherein I chuse rather to deserue thy commendations, they, by my owne praises, to set my labours out to sale. The trueth is, although I was not so idle when I composed these Ayres, that I dare not Stand to the hazard of their examination: Yet I would be glad (if it might be) that thy friendly approbation might giue me incouragement, to sound my thankefulnes more sweetely in thine eares hereafter. If the Ditties dislike thee, 'tis my fault that was so bold to publish the priuate contentments of diuers Gentlemen without their consents, though (I hope) not against their wils: wherein if thou find anie thing to meete with thy desire, thank me; for they were neuer meant thee. I know not how the vulgar esteeme of trauell, but me thinkes there should be no Gentleman (When he may buy so much paines, for so little money) that will not conclude, he can at least be no looser by the bargaine. If anie Musicion will out of the pride of his cunning disdaine me and these my beginnings, as things not worth his enuie, these are to desire him (if he be not growne past all charitie,) that he would accept the subscription of my Name, as a sufficient Testimonie, that I am not ashamed of instruction, wherein soeuer I may appeare to haue out-run my Iustication. As for the rest that would faine informe men, they know some thing by their generall dislike of euenie thing; I will not so much as desire them to be silent, least I should hereby teach them at least how, they might seeme wise. For the Booke I will saie onely thus much; there hath not yet beene anie extant of this fashion, which if thou shalt pronounce to be but worth thy hearing, I rest satisfied, if not thy debtor. Farewell.

Least anie man should seeme to accuse me or singularitie for expressing the time of my songes, by prickel-song Notes neuer heretofore vsed: I haue for his better instruction hereunto indeuoured to satisfie him.

A Semibreefe, Minnum, Chrochet, Quauer.

Source ; Edward Doughtie's 'Lyrics From Elizabethan Airs , 1596-1622' Cambridge, Mass. Harvard University Press, 1970, page 149,

Notes from Edward Doughtie's 'Lyrics From Elizabethan Airs , 1596-1622';
" To the Reader
28 of this fashion. I. e, with both mensural and tablature bass."



I. LOVE WING'D MY HOPES

Love wing'd my hopes and taught me howe to flie
farre from base earth but not to mount to hie,
for thy true pleasure
lives in measure
which if men forsake,
blinded they into follie runne, and grief for pleasure take.

But my vaine hopes proude of their new taught flight,
Enamour'd sought to woo the Sunnes fayre light,
whose rich brightnesse
mooved there lightnesse
to aspire so hye,
That all scorch't and consum'd wth fire, now drowned in woe they lye.

And none but love their wofull hap did rue,
For love did know that their desires were true,
though fate frowned,
and now all drowned,
they in sorrow dwell,
It was the purest light of heaven, for whose fayre love they fell.

Source ; The Muses Gardin: Lute Songs by Robert Jones' by Emma Kirkbe and Anthony Rooley (1991), Virgin Classics.

I. Love winged my hopes and taught me how to fly - Notes, Recordings and Comments

A recording of this song is on the CD 'The Muses Gardin: Lute Songs by Robert Jones' by Emma Kirkbe and Anthony Rooley (1991), on Virgin Classics. This is the only CD, I know of, that is dedicated entirely to the music of Robert Jones. Kirkbe and Rooley recorded four songs from all of Jones's bookes of ayers but his fifth (and last) where they only recorded one song. The other three song, on the CD, from this second booke are the ever popular 'Now what is love', 'X. Love's god is a boy' and 'XVII. Love is a bable'. - P. T. C.

Notes from Edward Doughtie's 'Lyrics From Elizabethan Airs , 1596-1622';
"Cf. the version in [Thomas Morley's booke of ayres of l600 # X] ... Jones corrects Morley's text in line 8."

Strangely, a recording of Thomas Morley's version of this text seems to be hard to find. It might be out there but, for a midi version of it, go to Harald Lillmeyer's site at; http://kulturserver-bayern.de/home/harald-lillmeyer - P. T. C.

#"Love wing'd my hopes" clearly illustrates the second type [one that is much more pronounced in individual character and structural importance] of accompaniment. The song begins with the viol introducing the first point of imitation in its alto range over the G in the bass. ... This first phrase alone illustrates how the viol functions to introduce motivic material, provides a rich polyphonic texture and carry a phrase forward. ... - P. 11, Deborah Teplow

# Journal of the Viola da Gamba Society of America, Lyra Viol Accompaniment In Robert Jones' The Second Booke of Songs and Ayres (1601) by Deborah Teplow



II. MY LOVE BOUND ME WITH A KISS

My love bound me with a kiss
That I should no longer stay.
When I felt so sweet a bliss,
I had less power to part away.
Alas, alas, alas, that women doth not know
Kisses makes men loth to go.

Yes, she knows it but to well,
For I heard when Venus' dove
In her ear did softy tell
That kisses were the seals of love.
O muse, O muse, O muse not then though it be so,
Kisses makes men loth to go.

Wherefore did she thus inflame
My desires, heat my blood,
Instantly to quench the same,
And starve whom she had given food? [see Fire fire]
Ay, ay, ay, ay, ay, ay, the common sense can show
Kisses makes men loth to go.

Had she bid me go at first,
It would ne'er have grieved my heart;
Hope delayed had been the worst.
But ah! to kiss and then part!
How deep, how deep, how deep it struck, speak, gods, you know.
Kisses makes men loth to go.

Source ; The English School of Lutenist Song-Writers Series 2, volume 5. The Second booke of ayres (1601) by Robert Jones, Edited by Edmund H. Fellowes, Stainer & Bell (1926). Typed Feburary 16, 2004

II. My love bound me with a kiss - Notes, Recordings and Comments.

The first significant Campian lyric comes in Robert Jones' second book 1601. This is air II 'My Love Bound Me With a Kiss'. This poem is a translation of one of five Campian Latin poems that were added to an edition of Philip Sidney's 'Astrophel and Stella' (1591). These five Latin poems, as far as is known, are the first works of Campian published. The English version of 'My Love Bound Me With a Kiss' is unique to Jones. We do not know whether it is Campian's original English version of the poem, which he translated into Latin, or if it is someones translation of the Latin poem into English.

Read my essay; "Robert Jones' Association with Thomas Campion".

I don't know of any recording of this song.



All materials are copyright Patrick Thomas Connolly, 2003.
Updated December 14, & 24, 2003 & February 29, 2004. - by Patrick T. Connolly.
Last update February 28, 2009. - by Patrick T. Connolly.
Edward Doughtie's 'Lyrics From Elizabethan Airs , 1596-1622' Cambridge, Mass. Harvard University Press, 1970.

The Muses Gardin: Lute Songs by Robert Jones' by Emma Kirkbe and Anthony Rooley (1991), Virgin Classics.

Penguin English Verse: Volume 2 The seventeenth Century Donne to Rochester. page 40 - 45

M. P. Tilley, A Dictionary of the Proverbs in England in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries (Ann Arbor, 1950)



To - The second Booke, Part 2 -V to XV
Go ahead to The Second Booke, Part 3 - Ayres XVI to XXI.'

Return to ' The First Booke, Part 1 - Airs I to III'




III. O MY THOUGHTS DO BEAT ME,

O, O my thoughts do beat me, [7]
O my thoughts do beat me,
Which by deep sighs entreat thee. [7]
Hey ho, hey ho, fie, fie, fie, fie, what a thing is this! [8]
Thus to lie still when we might kiss [8]
And play, and play, and play, and play, and play, and play, and fool [4]
Here in the cool [4]
Of the stillest, clearest, sweetest, sweetest, evening [10]
Philomel did ever choose for singing, did ever choose for singing,
Philomel did ever choose for singing, [10]
Philomel did ever choose for singing, did ever choose for singing,

See, see how my lips complain them,
See how my lips complain them, [7]
Thy lips should just detain them. [7]
Ay me, ay me, hark, hark, hark, hark, how the nightingales [8]
In the dark to each other calls; [8]
Whilst thou, whilst thou, whilst thou, whilst thou,
whilst thou, whilst thou, O thou [4]
Dar'st not avow [4]
The enjoying of the truest, truest pleasure [10]
Love did ever hoard up in his treasure, did ever hoard up in his treasure,
Love did ever hoard up in his treasure, [10]
Love did ever hoard up in his treasure, did ever hoard up in his treasure,

Source ; The English School of Lutenist Song-Writers Series 2, volume 5. The Second booke of ayres (1601) by Robert Jones, Edited by Edmund H. Fellowes, Stainer & Bell (1926).

III. O my thoughts do beat me - Notes, Recordings and Comments



IV. DREAMS AND IMAGINATIONS

Dreams and imaginations
Are all the recreation
Absence can gain me.
Dreams when I wake, dreams when I wake confound me,
Thoughts for her sake doth wound me,
Lest she disdain me.
Then sinking, let me lie,
Or thinking, let me die,
Since love, since love, since love, hath slain me.

Dreams are but coward and do
Much good they dare not stand to, [back up cf To the reader " I dare ]
Ashamed of the morrow.
Thought's like a child, thought's like a child that winketh, [Cupid]
He's not beguiled that thinketh
Hath pierced me through.
Both filling me with blisses;
Both killing me with kisses;
Dying, dying, dying in sorrow.

Dreams with their false pretences
And thoughts confound my senses
In the conclusion,
Which like a glass, which like a glass did show me
What came to pass and threw me
Into confusion.
She made me leave all other,
Yet she had got another;
This was, this was, this was abusion.

Source ; The English School of Lutenist Song-Writers Series 2, volume 5. The Second booke of ayres (1601) by Robert Jones, Edited by Edmund H. Fellowes, Stainer & Bell (1926).

IV. Dreams and imaginations - Notes, Recordings and Comments