Go back to ' The Complete Works Of Robert Jones '.
Return to this Philip Rosseter and Robert Jones web site's primary page.
Go back to this Phreap Site's front door.

The First Booke of Songes and Ayres - 1600
Composed by Robert Jones
Part 2 - Airs IV to VI (of 21 airs).

Return to ' The First Booke, Part 1 - Airs I to III '
Go ahead to 'The First Booke, Part 3 - VII to IX'

Under Construction.
This is an unfinished page that I hope to edit sometime in the future.


IV. ONCE DID I LOVE

Once did I love, and yet I live 8
Though love and truth be now forgotten. 9
Then did I joy, now do I grieve 8
That holy vows must needs be broken, 9
That holy vows must needs be broken.

Hers be the blame that caused it so;
Mine be the grief though it be little.
She shall have shame, I cause, to know
What 'tis to love a dame so fickle,
What 'tis to love a dame so fickle.

Love her that list! I am content,
For that chameleon like she changeth,
Yielding such mists as may prevent
My sight to view her when she rangeth, (see "13 O my poor eyes")
My sight to view her when she rangeth

Let him not vaunt that gains my loss,
For when that he and Time hath proved her, (13 O 'For she that' 'since thou her slave')
She may him bring to weeping cross.
I say no more, because I loved her,
I say no more, because I loved her.

Source ; The English School of Lutenist Song-Writers Series 2, volume 4. The first booke of songes and ayres, 1600. Stainer & Bell (1959).

IV. Once did I love - Notes, Recordings and Comments

Notes from Edward Doughtie's 'Lyrics From Elizabethan Airs , 1596-1622 ';

" IIII. Bond (III. 487) ascribes this poem to Lyly without evidence. Other copies of the poem may he found in (D) Bod. MS Ashmole 38 (mid-17th century), p. 118, where it is "Song the 14th," and in (E) Bod. MS Douce 280 (before 1633, poems probably before 1603), fol. 68-68v, with "Tho: Say:" in the margin. E begins with this stanza:

In Prime of youth when loue was younge,
My restless ranginge minde regarded,
A louinge harte yet false her tounge,
Whose wilye witts he he hath obserued.

In the margin after each stanza, E has "Again." The variants continue:

1 .and yet] yet still DE
2 though] since E
loue. " now] faith and troath be quite D, faith & troth is quite E
... -
19 I] Ile DE

12 chameleon ... changeth. Tilley C221.
18 weeping cross. Tilley W248."

I don't know of any recordings of this song but a midi file of the song, made by Harald lillmeyer, can be found at; http://kulturserver-bayern.de/home/harald-lillmeyer
Look under 'Downloads'.

It seems to me 'Thomas Say ...' is, as close as anyone may ever get to knowing, the identity of the author of this poem. To me this lyric seems similar in theme and style to "XIII. O my poor eyes", in this same Jones book, so perhaps they were both written by the same author, who might well be a 'Tho[mas] Say . . .' - Patrick T. Connolly - May 29, 2004.



V. LED BY A STRONG DESIRE

Lead by a strong desire 6
To have a thing unseen, 6
Nothing could make me tire 6
To be, to be, to be where as I had been. 7
I got her sight, which made me think 8
My thirst was gone because I saw my drink. 12

Kept by the careful watch
Of more than hundred eyes,
I sought but could on catch
The thing, the thing, the thing she not denies. 6
'Tis better to be blind and fast
Than, hungry, see thy love and can not taste.

But lovers' eyes do wake
When others are at rest;
And in the night they slake
The fire, the fire, the fire of day's unrest.
Methinks that joy is of most worth
Which painful Time and passed fears bring forth.

Yet husbands do suppose
To keep their wives by art,
And parents will disclose
By looks, by looks, by looks their children's heart.
As if they which have will to do
Had not the wit to blind such keepers too.

Peace then, ye aged fools,
That know yourselves so wise,
That from experience schools
Do think, do think, do think wit must arise.
Give young men leave to think, and say:
Your senses with your bodies do decay.

Love ruleth like a god,
Whom earth keeps not in awe,
Nor fear of smarting rod
Denounced , denounced, denounced by reasonžs law.
Give grave advice, but rest you there.
Youth hath his course and will; and you youths were.

Think not by prying care
To pick lovežs secrets out;
If you suspicious are
Yourselves, yourselves, yourselves resolve your doubt.
Who seek to know such deeds once done
Finds perjury before confession.

Source ; The English School of Lutenist Song-Writers Series 2, volume 4. The first booke of songes and ayres, 1600. Stainer & Bell (1959).

V. Led by a strong desire - Notes, Recordings and Comments

Notes from Edward Doughtie's 'Lyrics From Elizabethan Airs , 1596-1622 ';

9 hundred eyes. The unusal allusion to Argus in connection with watchful jealousy;
Cf. Mo 1600. VII. [Thomas Morley's The First Booke Of Ayres (1600), #7. Who is it that this darke night] 42 and Tilley E254."

The ninth stanza of #7. 'Who is it that this darke night' by Thomas Morley from his The First Booke Of Ayres (1600);

Well be gon, be gon I say,
Least that Argues eayes perceiue you,
O vniustest fortunes sway,
Which can make me thus to leaue,
And from Loutes to runne away.

words by: Sir Philip Sidney: "Astrophel and Stella", song 11.

Source ; A site created by Harald Lillmeyer where Morley's Ayers can be found.

Ovid says "Argus had a head set round with a hundred eyes, of which two in turn were always resting, while the others kept watch and remained on guard." - Metamorphoses, Books I.

I don't know of any recording of this song (except for my own primitive personal recordings Lead by a strong desire (R Iones 1600). A midi file of the song, made by Harald lillmeyer, can be found at; http://kulturserver-bayern.de/home/harald-lillmeyer
Look under 'Downloads'.



VI. LIE DOWN, POOR HEART

Lie downe, poore heart and die a while for griefe
thinke not that this world will ever do thee good,
fortune forewarnes ye looke to thy reliefe,
and sorrow sucks upon thy living bloud,
then this is all can helpe thee of this hell,
lie downe and die and then thou shalt doe well.

Day gives his light but to thy labours toyle
And night her rest but to thy weary bones
Thy fairest fortune follows with a foyle:
And laughing endes but with their after grones
then this is all can helpe thee of thy hell,
lie downe and die and then thou shalt doe well.

Patience doth pine and pitty ease no paine,
Time weares the thoughts but nothing helps the mind,
Dead and alive alive and dead againe:
These are the fits that thou art like to finde.
then this is all can helpe thee of thy hell,
lie downe and die and then thou shalt doe well.

Source ; The lyrics to the CD 'The Muses Gardin: Lute Songs by Robert Jones' by Emma Kirkbe and Anthony Rooley (1991).

VI. Lie down, poor heart - Notes, Recordings and Comments

Notes from Edward Doughtie's 'Lyrics From Elizabethan Airs , 1596-1622 ';
"VI. Bond (III, 501) ascribes these verses to Lyly without evidence.
5 this hell. EMV, p. 550 emends to thy hell."
Notes from Edmund H. Fellowes' 'English Madrigal Verse';
"vi. 5 thy] this 1600."

A recording of this song is on the CD 'The Muses Gardin: Lute Songs by Robert Jones' by Emma Kirkbe and Anthony Rooley (1991), on Virgin Classics. This is the only CD, I know of, that is dedicated entirely to the music of Robert Jones.

In his liner notes, to this CD, Anthony Rooley defends Jones from modern critics saying "Jones' best melancholy ayres are deeply influenced by the acknowledged master of melancholy [John Dowland] and, at their best, may be compared favorably to all but three of four greatest of Dowland's melancholy masterpieces. Dowland's 'Flow My Tears', Stay Sorrow', or 'Come Heavy Sleep', are individual creations of genius beyond comparison; but listen to Jones'Lie downe poore heart' [from Jones's first book (1600) VI] ,' 'Flye from the world', [from Jones's third book (1605) XIV] or 'If in this flesh' [from Jones's fourth book, (1609) XV] ,' I am sure the unbiased ear will find inspired melancholy of the richest kind. ...."

One of those modern critics is David Brown who writes in the The New Grove Dictionary (in, and before, the 1980, to the 2001 editions and on). "In his second collection he intermittently essayed a more pathetic vein, but the results are feeble when compared to the models that Dowland offered him."

Brown's statement is just not true as far as Jones's second book goes. That book is has no more 'pathetic' songs (which I take to be 'melancholy' songs) than any other of Jones's books. Dowland's second book (1600) is the English masterpiece of melancholy and Brown's subliminal suggestion, that Jones's airy second book was an attempted imitation of that masterpiece, is a callous misdirection.

Another recording of this song is on the CD; Lie Down, Poor Heart English Lutesongs & Folk Ballads - Daniel Taylor (countertenor) and Sylvain Bergron (lute) on Dorian Recordings 2000, DOR-90287, Troy, New York 12180 USA www:http://www.Dorian.com

A midi file of the song, made by Harald lillmeyer, can be found at; http://kulturserver-bayern.de/home/harald-lillmeyer
Look under 'Downloads'.

January 1st, 2003 - P. T. C.



Return to ' The First Booke, Part 1 - To The Reader, Airs I to III '
Go ahead to 'The First Booke, Part 3 - VII to IX'
Updated [July 15 2007 SoundClick links] May 29, 2004, this page was written & compiled by Patrick Connolly.
All materials are copyright Đ Patrick Thomas Connolly, 2002, 2003 & 2004.
Get out of here and go to a feature on an unusual Japanese music group called ' Tama '.
Go to Patrick T. Connolly's own poetry & music page 'Put your Bum To Work'.
Go to Patrick T. Connolly's Animation Resume.
Learn about this Web Site.
Page Bibliography

Edward Doughtie's 'Lyrics From Elizabethan Airs , 1596-1622' Cambridge, Mass. Harvard University Press, 1970.

The English School of Lutenist Song-Writers Series 2, volume 4. The first booke of songes and ayres, 1600. Stainer & Bell (1959).

The CD 'The Muses Gardin: Lute Songs by Robert Jones' by Emma Kirkbe and Anthony Rooley (1991), on Virgin Classics.

M. P. Tilley, A Dictionary of the Proverbs in England in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries (Ann Arbor, 1950)

A site created by Harald Lillmeyer that can be found at; http://kulturserver-bayern.de/home/harald-lillmeyer
Look under 'Downloads'.

The Metamorphoses Of Ovid - by Ovid, translated by Mary Innes 1955, page 45 - Penguin Books


SoundClick Now!