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The First Booke of Songes and Ayres - 1600
Composed by Robert Jones
Part 1 - To The Reader, Airs I to III (of 21 airs).
Go to ' The First Booke, Part 2 - Airs IV to VI '
Go ahead to 'The First Booke, Part 3 - VII to IX'

Under Construction.
This is an unfinished page that I hope to edit sometime in the future.


The first booke of songes a ayres of foure parts with tableture for the lute. So made that all the parts together, or either of them severall, may be song to the lute, orpherian or viol de gambo ...

Printed by Peter Short with the assent of Thomas Morley, and are to be sold at the signe of the starre on Bredstreet Hill 1600.


Dedication

...

Notes from Edward Doughtie's 'Lyrics From Elizabethan Airs , 1596-1622'

Sir Robert Sidney (1563-1626), younger brother of Sir Philip, later had the Earldom of Leicester revived for him. Ben Jonson praised his hospitality in his poem "To Pertshurst" (Works, VIII, 93-96), and a number of books were dedicated to him, including one by his godson, Robert Dowland (RDo1610). See also the dedication to Jo1610. PNB, Williams.)


To The Reader

... Since my desire is your eares should be my indifferent iudges, I cannot thinke it necessary to make my trauels, or my bringing up arguments to perswade you that I have a good opinion of my selfe, only thus much I will saie: That I may preuent the rash iudgments of such as know me not. Euer since I practised speaking, I haue practicsed singing; hauing had noe other qualitie to hinder me from the perfect knowledge of this faculty, I ...

Notes from Edward Doughtie's 'Lyrics From Elizabethan Airs , 1596-1622'
3 my trauels. Probably an allusion to Dowland's epistle in Do1597.



Publishing History

1600. The original book was first published in 1600. RISM A/I/4 J642.

1925. Transcribed, Scored and Edited by Edmund H. Fellowes.
The English School of Lutenist Song-Writers Series 2, volume 4. The first booke of songes and ayres, 1600. London: Stainer & Bell, 43 pages. contents: SEE 687.

1959. Transcribed, scored and edited by Edmund H. Fellowes; revised by Thurston Dart..
The English School of Lutenist Song-Writers Series 2, volume 4. The first booke of songes a ayres, 1600. London: Stainer & Bell, 43 pages. Revised Edition for voice and piano. contents: see 687.

1970. Facsimile edition : Reproduced from copies in the British Museum and the Folger Shakespeare Library.
English lute songs, series Volume 26. The first booke of songes a ayres, 1600. Edited by David Greer. Menston. Eng.: Scolar press, 51 pages
contents : SEE 687.

1987. Musica Britannica - Collected English Lutenist Partsongs I - Edited by David Greer 70 partsongs by Michael Cavendish, Robert Jones, Francis Pilkington and John Bartlett are presented in four‚part score with lute tablature and transcription. First published in 1987.


Updated June 12, 2004, this page was written & compiled by Patrick Connolly.
All materials are copyright © Patrick Thomas Connolly, 2002, 2003 & 2004.
I. A WOMAN'S LOOKS

A woman's looks
Are barbed hooks,
That catch by art
The strongest heart,
When yet they spend no breath,
But let them speak,
And sighing break
Forth into tears,
Their words are spears
That wound our souls to death.

The rarest wit
Is made forget,
And like a child (- same rhyme as Jones #2 in this 1st booke)
Is oft beguiled,
With Love's sweet seeming bait:
Love with his rod
So like a god
Commands the mind
We cannot find.
Fair shows hide foul deceit.

Time, that all things
In order brings
,
Hath taught me now
To be more slow,
In giving faith to speech:
Since women's words
No truth affords,
And when they kiss
They think by this
Us men to over reach.

Source ; The English School of Lutenist Song-Writers Series 2, volume 4. The first booke of songes and ayres, 1600. Stainer & Bell (1959).

I. A Woman's looks - Notes, Recordings and Comments

There is a midi file of this song that was made by Mr. Harald Lillmeyer. It is available on his site at; http://kulturserver-bayern.de/home/harald-lillmeyer

I don't know of any recording of this song except for my own personal recordings. Thus this is another Jones song that is not available anywhere else. I have a new demo MD master of 22 cover songs that includes this song. It is now called 'P. T. Connolly Covers Cover Songs For Fun & Practice'. My recording of 'A Woman's looks' was going OK (better than my recording of Jones's 'Dainty darling' from his 2nd book), until I put the vocal on. I will repair it sometime. If you want a copy of my MD e-mail me; minchan@cba.att.ne.jp. It is free at the moment. - P. T. C.

Notes from Edward Doughtie's 'Lyrics From Elizabethan Airs , 1596-1622'

Bond (III, 485-6) suggests without evidence that John Lyly was the author of these verses.

21 Faire shewes. Cf. Tilley F3 and F29.
21 deceit. Rhymes with bait (line 16). Shakespeare rhymes deceit and conceit with state, straight and waite. See K8keritz, pp. 407, 421, 475.
23-24 Time... bringes. Cf. Tilley T333.



II. FOND WANTON YOUTHS

Fond wanton youths(, fond wanton youths) make Love a god, 8 syllables
Which after proveth Age's rod. 8
Their youth, their time, their wit, their art, 8
They spend in seeking of their smart; 8
And, which of follies is the chief, 8
They woo their woe, (they woo their woe, ) they wed their grief. 8

All find it so(, all find it so) who wedded are.
Love's sweets, they find, enfold sour care:
His pleasures pleasing'st in the eye,
Which, tasted once, with loathing die.
They find of follies 'tis the chief,
Their woe to woo, (their woe to woo, ) to wed their grief.

If for their own, if for their own, content they choose,
Forth-with their kindred's love they lose.
And if their kindred they content,
For ever after they repent.
O, 'tis of all our follies chief,
Our woe to woo, (our woe to woo, ) to wed our grief.

In bed what strifes(, in bed what strifes) are bred by day
Our pulling wives do open lay.
None friends, none foes we must esteem
But whom they so vouchsafe to deem.
O, 'tis of all our follies chief,
Our woe to woo, (our woe to woo, ) to wed our grief.

Their smiles we want, (their smiles we want,) if aught they want;
And either we their wills must grant,
Or die they will or are with child.
Their laughings must not be beguiled. (- same rhyme as Jones #1 before)
O, 'tis of all our follies chief,
Our woe to woo, (our woe to woo, ) to wed our grief.

Foul wives are jealous, (foul wives are jealous,) fair wives false.
Marriage to either binds us thrall.
Wherefore being bound we must obey, (- see # 13 & book 2 'bound')
And forced be perforce to say:
Of all our bliss it is the chief,
Our woe to woo, (our woe to woo, ) to wed our grief.

Source ; The English School of Lutenist Song-Writers Series 2, volume 4. The first booke of songes and ayres, 1600. Stainer & Bell (1959).

II. Fond Wanton youths - Notes, Recordings and Comments

I do not mind to point out that William Shakespeare was married, when he was only eighteen, to an older woman. The quality of his marriage has proved to be a very interesting subject for many people. Some think that leaving her for a life away in London, and only leaving her his second best bed in his will, does not show a happy marriage. Was Shakespeare once a 'fond wanton youth', who 'wed his grief' as a teenager? Was Shakespeare one of the Wills that 'we their wills[hakespeares] must grant'? (I should add that on the contrary side that Shakespeare's Sonnets do come of very strongly in favor of the young man they are addressed to getting married.) - Patrick T. Connolly - May 27, 2004.

I don't know of any recording of this song but there is a midi file of this song that was made by Mr. Harald Lillmeyer. It is available on his site at; http://kulturserver-bayern.de/home/harald-lillmeyer/Texte/Downloads/Downloads.html

Notes from Edward Doughtie's 'Lyrics From Elizabethan Airs , 1596-1622'
II.
This poem also appears in (D) Richard Johnson's collection, The Golden Garland of Princely Pleasures (1620). sigs. F7-F8, with the title, "Of the inconueniences by Marriage. To the tune of When Troy town ." (See the discussion of this tune in Simpson, pp. 587-590.) Another copy occurs in (E) BM MS Add. 22603 (mid 17th century), fol. 58-58v, headed "A songe against Marriage." The variants are as follows:

1 youths make] youth makes DE
3 their arte] and art D
7 finde know E
so] omitted E
who] that D, which haue E
are] bin E
8 sweetes ... sowre] sweet-sharpe sowres inclosed E
9 pleasures... in] pleasing'st pleasures are in E
---- page 487
11 They... chiefe] And which of follyes &c E
13 content] delight E
choose] chose E
15 And... content] If they theyr kindred will content E
17 O ...chide] So that of follyes is &c E
19 strifes...bred] greifes...wrought E
23 O...chiefe] Of follyes all it is the &c E
25 smiles] smile D
26 And ... grant] If what they craue, we doe not graunt E
27 Or] Then
28 laughings] laughing D, longinges E
29 O... chiefe] Of follyes &c E
31 false] fall D
32 bindes vs thrall] makes vs thralls E
33 Wherefore] And E
34 be] are E
35 blisse it is] follies tis D

A poem by Robert Greene from Ciceronis Amor, Tullies Loue (1589; 5th ed. 1609, sig. D3) has a similar opening line "Fond faining Poets of love a god." The rest of the poem is different, however[.] Bond (III, 486) ascribes Jones's text to John Lyly without evidence.

7. are. Rhymes with care (line 8). See K8keritz, p. 405.
28 laughings. The reading from E above, longings, may be preferred.
31 Foule wiues ...false. This sounds proverbial, but is not in Tilley. Cf. Chaucer, Wife of Bath Tail, 1213-1226 (Works, ed. F. N. Robinson [Boston : Houghton Miffin, 2nd ed., 1957]. p. 88), and Thomas Deloney, Jack of Newberry in The Novels, ed. (Bloomington; University of Indiana Press, 1961), pp. 9-11: "As young maides are fickle, so are old women iealous"



III. SHE WHOSE MATCHLESS BEAUTY

1
She whose matchlesse beauty stayneth
What best iudgement fairst maintaineth,
Shee, O shee my loue disdaineth.
2
Can a creature so excelling,
Harbour scorne in beauties dwelling,
All kinde pitty thence expelling ?
3
Pitty beauty much commendeth,
And th'imbracer oft befriendeth,
When all eie-contentment endeth.

4
Time proues beauty transitory
Scorne; the staine of beauties glory,
In time makes the scorner sorie.
5
None adores the sunne declining,
Loue all loue fals to resigning,
When the sunne of loue leaues shining.
6
So when flowre of beauty failes thee,
And age stealing on affailes thee,
Then marke what this scorne auailes thee.
7
Then those hearts which now complaining,
Feele the wounds of thy disdaining,
Shall contemne thy beauty waining.
8
Yea thine owne hart now deere prized,
Shall with spite and griefe surprised,
Burst to finde it selfe despised.
9
When like harmes haue them requited,
Who in others harmes delighted,
Pleasingly the wrong'd are righted.
10
Such reuenge my wronges attending,
Hope still liues on time depending,
By the plagues my torments ending.

Text source ; A site created by Harald Lillmeyer. Mr. Lillmeyer typed the text from a facsimile of the 1600 booke and preserved the original spelling. This text is copyright © by Harald Lillmeyer, 2004 and is used by his permission. This site can be found at; http://kulturserver-bayern.de/home/harald-lillmeyer/Texte/Downloads/Downloads.html

III. She whose matchless beauty - Notes, Recordings and Comments

I don't know of any recording of this song but there is a midi file of this song that was made by Mr. Harald Lillmeyer. It is available on his site which is noted above. I have also made a midi file of the song but is is based on the Fellowes edition, as revised by Thurston Dart. If you want a copy, e-mail me at; minchan@cba.att.ne.jp.
- P. T. C. - June 12, 2004.
A recording of this was uploaded on August 28, 2007 on SoundClick.

About the song as on SoundClick
This is just recording of my midi file with effects of a song by Robert Jones that that was published in 1600. It was all programed by P. T. Connolly. This short ayer is repeated 5 times and I added the following effects;
No effects - Chorus Effect - Digital Delay - Auto Pan - Reverb.
This songs is not available on any CD or record as far as I know. I think Robert Jones may have had a greater involvement Twelfth Night than the one quote. In this play Voila says; Twelfth Night - Act I. Scene V. Voila: ... unmatchable beauty ... let me sustain no scorn ...

Notes from Edward Doughtie's 'Lyrics From Elizabethan Airs , 1596-1622'
III.
9-11 Pitty... endeth. I.e., Pity adorns or graces beauty, and the beautiful woman who has embraced Pity finds it a friend when her beauty is gone.



Go ahead to ' The First Booke, Part 2 - IV to VI'
Go to Patrick T. Connolly's Animation Resume.
Learn about this Web Site.
Page Bibliography

Edward Doughtie's 'Lyrics From Elizabethan Airs , 1596-1622' Cambridge, Mass. Harvard University Press, 1970.

The English School of Lutenist Song-Writers Series 2, volume 4. The first booke of songes and ayres, 1600. Stainer & Bell (1959).

The CD 'The Muses Gardin: Lute Songs by Robert Jones' by Emma Kirkbe and Anthony Rooley (1991), on Virgin Classics.

M. P. Tilley, A Dictionary of the Proverbs in England in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries (Ann Arbor, 1950)

A site created by Harald Lillmeyer that can be found at; http://kulturserver-bayern.de/home/harald-lillmeyer
Look under 'Downloads'.


Updated June 12, 2004, this page was written & compiled by Patrick Connolly.
Last update (where trick T. olly's recording of Robert Jones' 'III. She Whose matchless beauty' [from his Soundclick] was added) February 22, 2009. All materials are copyright © Patrick Thomas Connolly, 2002, 2003 & 2004.